Practice Video

tlm

G.O.A.T.
#3
If you take the ball a little more out in front I think you will notice some benefits.
Ya your right PP I should hit out in front more. Sometimes I do but it's strange it seems like I hit long more when I take the ball earlier. Probably because I upper cut the swing to much.
 
#4
You could also bend your knees a bit more on your strokes and load up more on the ball, especially your topspin forehand I think. You would get even more force into it.
 
#6
Looks like you have given up on changes?

If not, what is different? Only thing I see is the venue.

ON the Fh you seem to move back a lot. You might want to try to move forward. 29sec is a great example. Falling back like that produces a very short ball.
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
#7
Looks like you have given up on changes?

If not, what is different? Only thing I see is the venue.

ON the Fh you seem to move back a lot. You might want to try to move forward. 29sec is a great example. Falling back like that produces a very short ball.
Well you can't see where that shot my buddy hit landed but it was long, you can hear him say sorry. So I don't think you can judge my shot off a ball that was hit long.

What changes would you suggest I make. My game is built on consistency, that is my strong point. My main goal right now is to get the 2 handed backhand down so I can hit topspin off both sides.
 
#8
Well you can't see where that shot my buddy hit landed but it was long, you can hear him say sorry. So I don't think you can judge my shot off a ball that was hit long.

What changes would you suggest I make. My game is built on consistency, that is my strong point. My main goal right now is to get the 2 handed backhand down so I can hit topspin off both sides.
so that ball was out. Ok my bad. But look at 44, 8, 16, etc. you don't seem to move back nearly as much on the BH.

For changes, I would suggest you look at what Yandell wrote and all the other feedback on all the other vids you have posted. lots there and since things are the same the advice is still on target.
 
#10
On average you hit a bit late and your hitting zone is very short. Ideally you'd want to prep a bit earlier and lengthen the takeback to produce a bit more depth. (This is ignoring the chicken wing forehand you have going on. Not sure if that's even worth addressing / changing at this point.) A big thing I notice is the late prep. IME you want to be setting up and starting the takeback as the ball is crossing the net tape on to your side. Your hitting partner isn't hitting bullets obviously and you have lots of time to work on this. It will prevent rushing and the like. I coach a couple guys who hit similar to you and this is usually one of the better fixes we do to work on their game.

This all comes down to being proactive vs reactive. Being reactive doesn't allow one to set up a proper game plan and execute said game plan. Being proactive opens a whole new world of tennis strategy and skill sets. There is nothing wrong with having a defensive game style, but trying to be proactive with it and controlling court positions is a smart way to play a grinding style. By making your oppponent being to hit uncomfortable shots over time in the rally (for someone like you I would hazard a guess that by about 5-6 balls into a competitive rally you are starting to apply pressure and take control of the point) you can start to yo-yo them by putting yourself in a better position by prepping earlier and putting yourself into a proactive position on the court. You're obviously fit and can hit a good rally ball, it's probably time you start maximizing your tennis IQ as well. :) (obviously no offense meant in anyway, this is all from watching a 2 min non-competitive rally.)

-Fuji
 
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#11
You hit way too close to your body...
You are right I need more separation from the ball, at times I make a point to get farther away from the ball and I notice that I hit better. But for some reason if I don't make an extra effort to keep distance I end up to close to the ball.
 
#12
On average you hit a bit late and your hitting zone is very short. Ideally you'd want to prep a bit earlier and lengthen the takeback to produce a bit more depth. (This is ignoring the chicken wing forehand you have going on. Not sure if that's even worth addressing / changing at this point.) A big thing I notice is the late prep. IME you want to be setting up and starting the takeback as the ball is crossing the net tape on to your side. Your hitting partner isn't hitting bullets obviously and you have lots of time to work on this. It will prevent rushing and the like. I coach a couple guys who hit similar to you and this is usually one of the better fixes we do to work on their game.

This all comes down to being proactive vs reactive. Being reactive doesn't allow one to set up a proper game plan and execute said game plan. Being proactive opens a whole new world of tennis strategy and skill sets. There is nothing wrong with having a defensive game style, but trying to be proactive with it and controlling court positions is a smart way to play a grinding style. By making your oppponent being to hit uncomfortable shots over time in the rally (for someone like you I would hazard a guess that by about 5-6 balls into a competitive rally you are starting to apply pressure and take control of the point) you can start to yo-yo them by putting yourself in a better position by prepping earlier and putting yourself into a proactive position on the court. You're obviously fit and can hit a good rally ball, it's probably time you start maximizing your tennis IQ as well. :) (obviously no offense meant in anyway, this is all from watching a 2 min non-competitive rally.)

-Fuji

You are pretty much spot on, I prep to late and play more of a reactive style game. Your also right that I hit better as the rally goes on, I like to work into the point and get more aggressive after several shots.
 
#13
Here is a little rally practice from tonight, I am in the near court.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Tg0qJNkQpk
Good rally practice and seemed you were driving a few flatter as well. I would like to see you work on that early recognition for the very few mid court balls he gave you, so you are ready to jump up there quick and handle them with a flatter drive. It won't hurt to mix a bit of that in your rally practice and in fact I'd recommend it as part of your rally work :)

You have to work to remember the whole purpose of why we rally!
 

Alien

Hall of Fame
#15
I like the 2hbh, it seems high bouncing, goes deep and must bother your rival.

I guess it was already commented in your other video threads or people gave up but what seems awkward is obviousy your fh takeback. it is like too cut, not a fluid movement, makes you force it. If you moved the racquet head up and then move it down and fwd, it would generate better momentum, fluidity and headspeed to hit, the solid spin you get would be even heavier or faster.

Maybe too invested to change it but I keep messing with my takebacks and trying to adjust, it is doable.
 
#16
Do you regularly beat this player you're hitting with?
The guy I am hitting with in this clip usually beats me. I win against him if he is rusty but he is better than me.
The high school kid I play against I beat most of the time, but after this season he will probably be to good.

I play a couple of guys that are pretty close. I also play some guys that are a lot better than me were I am lucky to get more than 2 games a set.
 
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Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
#17
TLM, Are you looking to change or what? I am not sure because you just posted the video and didn't really ask for advice.

If so, Fuji is dead on with his suggestions. The thing is that we've been saying you are late in your prep for months, you acknowledge that you are late and you have not fixed it. You can fix this pretty quickly to be honest. It's just going to be habit reinforcement, but you can have it fixed in a month.

So I'm not sure if you are looking for advice. I can tell you that your 2 handed backhand will never be that good unless you prep earlier and take the ball out in front.

Next vid you should post with those changes. Maybe take a few weeks and then film.
 
#18
You hit way too close to your body...
Definitely need more space with the ball. On the FH, your elbow is low throughout the stroke, limiting the leverage you can get.

On your BH slice, much more shoulder turn on the TB to create a more forward swing path. Most of your slices are side spin, because you're swinging across the body, not through the ball.

On the upside, your avg footing appears to be a bit more stable than in previous clips.
 
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#19
TLM, Are you looking to change or what? I am not sure because you just posted the video and didn't really ask for advice.

If so, Fuji is dead on with his suggestions. The thing is that we've been saying you are late in your prep for months, you acknowledge that you are late and you have not fixed it. You can fix this pretty quickly to be honest. It's just going to be habit reinforcement, but you can have it fixed in a month.

So I'm not sure if you are looking for advice. I can tell you that your 2 handed backhand will never be that good unless you prep earlier and take the ball out in front.

Next vid you should post with those changes. Maybe take a few weeks and then film.
Just posting a clip a couple of guys mentioned that I have not posted a video in a while.
 

watungga

Professional
#20


So this is late impact and not out in front?

I'd like to help myself figure this out but I don't think it is easy to fix this.

TLM stroke is somehow embedded naturally to hit at this kind of timing. There will be a lot of muscles to adjust in order to hit more out in front. A major overhaul. Am I right?
 

heninfan99

Talk Tennis Guru
#21
Nah it is not too hard to change. For the last years I was swining a little late with the forehand but made up for it with a windshield wiper finish, the top spin annoyed opponents so I stayed with it. Over the winter I endeavored to hit flatter, without the windshield wiper except in emergencies. :)

I learned all that matters, pretty much, is hitting out in front and your finish.



So this is late impact and not out in front?

I'd like to help myself figure this out but I don't think it is easy to fix this.

TLM stroke is somehow embedded naturally to hit at this kind of timing. There will be a lot of muscles to adjust in order to hit more out in front. A major overhaul. Am I right?
 
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#23
Here is a little rally practice from tonight, I am in the near court.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Tg0qJNkQpk
Thanks for sharing!
You make it work with what you’ve got and you are consistent at your level…no doubt about that.
From the video I can hear the sound of your string at impact, so I’d guess either the tension is very high or the strings are dead. Coupling that with hitting late and arming the ball I’m not sure how long your elbow can tolerate the stress if you plan to play for another 5 or 10 years even though you are obviously strong and super fit now.
If you don’t play in a competitive league regularly and just want to play recreational tennis, there is no need to make any drastic changes because the pain vs. benefit is not worth it.
If you plan to win more matches in a league or improve your rating by 0.5, that’s a different story.
 
#24
Found the correct position.
Not Imo, as your pick has the guy leaning forward at the waist with too much weight on that front foot for ideal. I'm not saying he isn't making it work, but tlm's balance and cp are closer to ideal imo for those frames you share.
 
#26
Thanks for sharing!
You make it work with what you’ve got and you are consistent at your level…no doubt about that.
From the video I can hear the sound of your string at impact, so I’d guess either the tension is very high or the strings are dead. Coupling that with hitting late and arming the ball I’m not sure how long your elbow can tolerate the stress if you plan to play for another 5 or 10 years even though you are obviously strong and super fit now.
If you don’t play in a competitive league regularly and just want to play recreational tennis, there is no need to make any drastic changes because the pain vs. benefit is not worth it.
If you plan to win more matches in a league or improve your rating by 0.5, that’s a different story.

I am using 18 gauge Kevlar mains at 60 lbs. with poly x's at 67 lbs. you have good hearing to be able to hear high tension.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
#28
TLM plays a solid baseline game. He is perhaps more open-stance and a little arm-y in his shots, but he is consistent and reasonably powerful. His 2 hander is coming along nicely.
 

Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
#31
Not Imo, as your pick has the guy leaning forward at the waist with too much weight on that front foot for ideal. I'm not saying he isn't making it work, but tlm's balance and cp are closer to ideal imo for those frames you share.
Pretty sure that's an ATP pro. His balance and contact point are much more ideal.
 
#33
TLM, Are you looking to change or what? I am not sure because you just posted the video and didn't really ask for advice.

If so, Fuji is dead on with his suggestions. The thing is that we've been saying you are late in your prep for months, you acknowledge that you are late and you have not fixed it. You can fix this pretty quickly to be honest. It's just going to be habit reinforcement, but you can have it fixed in a month.

So I'm not sure if you are looking for advice. I can tell you that your 2 handed backhand will never be that good unless you prep earlier and take the ball out in front.

Next vid you should post with those changes. Maybe take a few weeks and then film.
Your probably right about my 2 hander but as of right now I am just trying to get it consistent, not concerned with power.
 

Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
#37
In fact, that guy just won a Grand Slam tournament 5 days ago :)

Thats what I thought. I mean I know people have weird agendas but to say that Stan Wa's balance is not optimal and his contact point is not as optimal as TLM's is hilarious. Wow. I know why I take a break from this area sometimes.


Your probably right about my 2 hander but as of right now I am just trying to get it consistent, not concerned with power.
Yes this is not about power, it is about consistency.

What is the toughest shot you deal with to your backhand? We both know - high bouncers. Taking it on the rise can tough for some. But you can always get better on hitting it more out in front. Try asking for high bouncers to your backhand and just make contact more in front of you, and you will see what I mean. Those balls suddenly will not be as tough to deal with. The key to this is you need to turn early like Fuji said. The reason you are not hitting at the optimal contact point is because you are not preparing on time.
 

watungga

Professional
#40
Not Imo, as your pick has the guy leaning forward at the waist with too much weight on that front foot for ideal. I'm not saying he isn't making it work, but tlm's balance and cp are closer to ideal imo for those frames you share.
I could only surmise that you have made a mindset of TLM as your baseline to start with.

His age and all his personal skills and limits have made him move to a target of a different kind of "ideal" balance?
 
#43
This kind of "practice" is essentially a waste of time. It does not simulate the type of shots you hit in a match, where you virtually never hit a ball from the middle of the court being hit right to you.
I cannot agree with you, I never feel like my time on the court is a waste. My partner and I maintained a 40 shot rally in this clip. Are you saying it is a waste of time to work on being able to keep the ball in the court shot after shot?

Because it is not to me, I know some may think it is boring and I used to be one of them. But not anymore I like the workout and freedom that just maintaining a rally brings.

I have found that this kind of practice is great for working on your strokes because you can swing freely and make little adjustments as you continue to hit shot after shot.
 
#44
I cannot agree with you, I never feel like my time on the court is a waste. My partner and I maintained a 40 shot rally in this clip. Are you saying it is a waste of time to work on being able to keep the ball in the court shot after shot?

Because it is not to me, I know some may think it is boring and I used to be one of them. But not anymore I like the workout and freedom that just maintaining a rally brings.

I have found that this kind of practice is great for working on your strokes because you can swing freely and make little adjustments as you continue to hit shot after shot.
I didn't say it wasn't fun or enjoyable. If that is your goal, go for it. But it isn't going to help you hit effective shots in a match, if that is your goal. You need targeted focus practice.
 
#45
I didn't say it wasn't fun or enjoyable. If that is your goal, go for it. But it isn't going to help you hit effective shots in a match, if that is your goal. You need targeted focus practice.
And not even that. They do have a focus here, and that is to hit the ball deep in the center.

BUT! Tennis is NOT a game of strokes, not above 3.0. It's a game of movement and footwork. Something like 90% of errors are due to you being hurried with your movement, or due to your bad footwork. This kind of a practice gives zero challenge for movement and footwork. Hence it's pretty much useless above 3.0.
 
#46
In fact, that guy just won a Grand Slam tournament 5 days ago :)
Yes, but he didn't win it with shots that looked like that one, lol and surely not like the one right before it where he was reaching even a bit more and missed. Yes, can you believe a 2 time slam champ missed a shot in a relaxed hit around??

That pic came from a very relaxed hit around where most any tennis experienced player should be able recognize the difference in that and how he plays points in matches. Only the most naïve would speculate that just because a player is a pro, they wouldn't have a poor contact point here and there from being pulled off balance or as in this case, just being a bit relaxed about what he is doing. :)
 
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#48
BUT! Tennis is NOT a game of strokes, not above 3.0. It's a game of movement and footwork. Something like 90% of errors are due to you being hurried with your movement, or due to your bad footwork. This kind of a practice gives zero challenge for movement and footwork. Hence it's pretty much useless above 3.0.
Which is why you never see 7.0s rally down the middle. Wait.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTjBXVQyiwg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRSZaVDzU2k
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2lIfnCKyhA

Too bad the players in the videos above never got the news. They could have been contenders.
 
#49
I could only surmise that you have made a mindset of TLM as your baseline to start with.

His age and all his personal skills and limits have made him move to a target of a different kind of "ideal" balance?
Something like that, but not saying he is better than WW of course, but you and everyone else on here have contact points that are good at times and not so good at others. That was not a great one for Stan and look at the shot before it along with the results of that one. Not impressive or reflective of how he plays on the big stage.
 
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#50
Which is why you never see 7.0s rally down the middle. Wait.

Too bad the players in the videos above never got the news. They could have been contenders.
Or like vid where Stan hit that shot in the other posts, where they are mostly hitting down the middle.
 
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