Pricier shoes are worth the money?

#1
Hello there,

I've seen a few threads on this subject before, but they were kind of old and I'm interested in knowing if the opinion has changed.

I've been playing for the last 10 months or so and I usually play 3 or 4 times per week, at a minimum. In my "shoe department" I have a pair of Nike Court Lite and a pair of Adidas Barricade court. Since I know they won't last for long, I have another pair of Court Lite and a pair of Asics Gel Dedicate 5 stocked up.

Since usually I wear out the "in-sole" and that I haven't that much money to spend on shoes, are pricier options worth the money? I understand that they might be better made but if a 100€ pair of shoes lasts the same as a 30€ pair of shoes.. might not be worth it.

Hope to hear all the nice feedback!

Cheers!
 
#3
Hello there,

I've seen a few threads on this subject before, but they were kind of old and I'm interested in knowing if the opinion has changed.

I've been playing for the last 10 months or so and I usually play 3 or 4 times per week, at a minimum. In my "shoe department" I have a pair of Nike Court Lite and a pair of Adidas Barricade court. Since I know they won't last for long, I have another pair of Court Lite and a pair of Asics Gel Dedicate 5 stocked up.

Since usually I wear out the "in-sole" and that I haven't that much money to spend on shoes, are pricier options worth the money? I understand that they might be better made but if a 100€ pair of shoes lasts the same as a 30€ pair of shoes.. might not be worth it.

Hope to hear all the nice feedback!

Cheers!
Durability isn't always better. but they always have better cushioning and better support during court movement.
 
#4
IMO, buy the most expensive tennis shoes you can afford that fit you properly.

If you wear them out quickly, so be it. Your feet are somewhat important, not only in support of your tennis activities, but also in support of your quality of life.

Consider this ... if you go through three pairs of shoes a year, and the expensive pair is costing you $100 more a time, that is $300 per year. Is it really worth risking your legs and feet for $300 per year?
 
#5
Consider this ... if you go through three pairs of shoes a year, and the expensive pair is costing you $100 more a time, that is $300 per year. Is it really worth risking your legs and feet for $300 per year?
This is actually a good point. Luckily I can somewhat handle those costs, though here that's almost half of the minimum wage. Yeah, my country is nice, but not that "rich".

I'm asking this because when I add up rackets, strings, overgrips, stringing, balls and so on, and so on... it adds up a bit. But yes, nice perspective. Thank you!
 

heninfan99

Talk Tennis Guru
#7
Hello there,

I've seen a few threads on this subject before, but they were kind of old and I'm interested in knowing if the opinion has changed.

I've been playing for the last 10 months or so and I usually play 3 or 4 times per week, at a minimum. In my "shoe department" I have a pair of Nike Court Lite and a pair of Adidas Barricade court. Since I know they won't last for long, I have another pair of Court Lite and a pair of Asics Gel Dedicate 5 stocked up.

Since usually I wear out the "in-sole" and that I haven't that much money to spend on shoes, are pricier options worth the money? I understand that they might be better made but if a 100€ pair of shoes lasts the same as a 30€ pair of shoes.. might not be worth it.

Hope to hear all the nice feedback!

Cheers!
The best tennis shoes I ever had were the 2nd tier Court Ballistec 3.1. I would later get the top tier court ballistecs when they stopped making those and also the top tier vapors. Neither were as good for me.

So it's personal preference and I"m sure there are excellent choices in the lower price range.
 
#8
I buy insoles separately to fit my feet. The outsoles I wear out. I only buy the 6-month guarantee or TW review outsole durability >4.1 shoes. But to save, I get the old models. Annoyingly, models come and go and sometimes a new model of a similar name has a differing fit and all. So it sometimes takes some searching to find a pair, and I change brand and model all the time (whatever is at a good price at the time, usually I aim for 50% off).
 
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mxmx

Professional
#9
It depends. If you are a toe dragger, only the more expensive shoes have proper protection there. Then I'd say go expensive/pro level shoes. If you are not a toe dragger, the shoes just below top of the range (barracade team etc) are probably good enough.

You can consider adding better insoles to protect your knees. You can also extend the soles with something like shoo goo.
 
#10
Oh wait. WAIT! When I meant "in-soles" was not the insoles (which is what it is called, learned just now) but the out-soles on the inside side, like this image, but way worse: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-wGqTWCbi3so/UT6DbK4OxUI/AAAAAAAAAF0/z5tlUUJ-z9Y/s1600/Tennis+Shoes.jpg (image is just too big to add to the post).

On the "actual" insoles, everything is fine. Sorry about the confusion :(

@armandogomes, please note, I said the most expensive shoes YOU can afford ... NOT the most expensive shoes full stop!
I got that. I'm just adding an interesting fact about my country :) I always try to find some good deals on sales...

The best tennis shoes I ever had were the 2nd tier Court Ballistec 3.1. I would later get the top tier court ballistecs when they stopped making those and also the top tier vapors. Neither were as good for me.
I had a Court Ballistec 2.1, black and green-yellow-ish. Loved them.

I buy insoles separately to fit my feet. The outsoles I wear out. I only buy the 6-month guarantee or TW review outsole durability >4.3 shoes. But to save, I get the old models. Annoyingly, models come and go and sometimes a new model of a similar name has a differing fit and all. So it sometimes takes some searching to find a pair, and I change brand and model all the time (whatever is at a good price at the time).
You can consider adding better insoles to protect your knees. You can extend the soles with something like shoo goo.
I might take this advice on insoles. Thanks!
 
#11
In my personal experience going with cheaper shoe models has always been worse for me.

Stick with major shoe models, and usually the ones endorsed by professionals.

I hate to say "more expensive" because if you shop smart you can find these types of shoes at huge discounts making them much more affordable.
 
#12
Oh wait. WAIT! When I meant "in-soles" was not the insoles (which is what it is called, learned just now) but the out-soles on the inside side, like this image, but way worse:
I always wear out the outsole under my right big toe, similar to you image. I think this is due to hitting pinpoint serves and playing on sand paper (=hard courts). In the past I've sometimes used Shoegoo (a brand of shoe glue) to cover the area, but it last less than one hour of play, so does not really make sense (I still use the product, but not on tennis shoe soles).

https://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Durability_Guaranteed_Mens_Tennis_Shoes/catpage-MSDURGUAR.html
 
#14
I disagree with the claim that pricier shoes are somehow always better, even when talking about shoes from a single maker.

One of the things about tennis shoes is that both lasting (the shape of the "foot" around which the shoe is constructed), cushioning, outsole traction patterns, and support can vary from model to model. Also, the goal of the shoe can vary from model to model: some are "durability" or "stability" shoes and some are "speed" or "match" shoes. People don't need the same thing, so buying a more expensive model just because it is more expensive doesn't make sense.

For example, I have feet that are wide in the toe box without having a lot of volume. The most expensive shoes from a maker often aren't the widest in the toe box (really depends on the brand). Fit really matters to me, and a better fit means better court performance in most cases.

In short, more expensive doesn't mean better.
 
#15
If you're on a budget, I think you have 2 good options:

1) Just keep buying cheaper tennis shoes. You don't seem to be complaining about anything other than wearing out the insoles, and honestly, the shoes you mentioned are good enough for most players. I think people on this forum are mostly equipment fanatics who overestimate the value of top of the line equipment. I've had both premium shoes and cheaper shoes, and that's where I stand on it. I've had cheaper shoes that worked great and premium shoes I hated.

2) You could buy the Adidas Barricades, which are premium shoes but the outsoles are more durable than anything else out there, so they will last long enough to justify the price. Look for sales on the discontinued models. When the insoles wear out, just buy an inexpensive pair of basic insoles that you can probably find at a drug store or shoe store for about $5. Even the premium shoes have cheap insoles because the pros always throw them out for custom orthotics.
 

mxmx

Professional
#16
If you're on a budget, I think you have 2 good options:

1) Just keep buying cheaper tennis shoes. You don't seem to be complaining about anything other than wearing out the insoles, and honestly, the shoes you mentioned are good enough for most players. I think people on this forum are mostly equipment fanatics who overestimate the value of top of the line equipment. I've had both premium shoes and cheaper shoes, and that's where I stand on it. I've had cheaper shoes that worked great and premium shoes I hated.

2) You could buy the Adidas Barricades, which are premium shoes but the outsoles are more durable than anything else out there, so they will last long enough to justify the price. Look for sales on the discontinued models. When the insoles wear out, just buy an inexpensive pair of basic insoles that you can probably find at a drug store or shoe store for about $5. Even the premium shoes have cheap insoles because the pros always throw them out for custom orthotics.
Recommending barricades without mentioning lack of comfort is not the best advice. They require a lot of break in. They are awesome if you dont mind that. I have a friend that has brand new barricades in his cupboard because they were so uncomfortable.. .he's playing with cheaper pair of 2nd tier shoes. Pity they don't fit me as he would have given them to me.

The problem with some cheaper models especially those that seem like fake leather stitched at the nose and other areas, are that they can be quite heavy and not very flexible.

The best value for money when you are not a toe dragger are the "team" or (equivalent thereof) versions. If you are a toe dragger get something that will last. Or else it will cost you more in the long run.

Also look into old stock sale items as they are just as good but only cheaper.

Edit: your level of play and seriousness towards tennis does play a role. If your planning to play on occasion go cheap. If you're planning to play club or league or tournaments it's worth the investment to spend more.
 
#17
Recommending barricades without mentioning lack of comfort is not the best advice. They require a lot of break in. They are awesome if you dont mind that. I have a friend that has brand new barricades in his cupboard because they were so uncomfortable.. .he's playing with cheaper pair of 2nd tier shoes. Pity they don't fit me as he would have given them to me.

The problem with some cheaper models especially those that seem like fake leather stitched at the nose and other areas, are that they can be quite heavy and not very flexible.

The best value for money when you are not a toe dragger are the "team" or (equivalent thereof) versions. If you are a toe dragger get something that will last. Or else it will cost you more in the long run.

Also look into old stock sale items as they are just as good but only cheaper.

Edit: your level of play and seriousness towards tennis does play a role. If your planning to play on occasion go cheap. If you're planning to play club or league or tournaments it's worth the investment to spend more.
You're entitled to your own opinion, but my views differ. You'll get a lot of differing opinions on the comfort of the Barricades. When TW did a review on the Barricade 2015, I think they gave it a 4.7 out of 5 for comfort and that was probably the highest score of the year. The current version has a lower score, but again, comfort is subjective and dependent on individual tastes and foot shapes. I kind of like the secure feeling they have.

Your statement on cheaper models being heavy is not backed up by evidence. If you get on TW and look at the 3 biggest names (Nike, Adidas, and Asics), you'll notice that many of the shoes under $80 are actually quite light, often around 13 oz or less. If anything, the shoes seem to get lighter as they get cheaper because a lot of them are take down models where certain materials are removed to cut costs. Look at Asics. The $65 Gel Dedicate is 12.0 oz while the top-of-the-line speed shoe, the Solutions Speed FF is 12.3 oz. If you want their lightest tennis shoe, you actually have to buy the cheap one!

I do agree that discounted old models are a great buy. I mentioned that in my previous post.

As for level of play, I've seen 5.0 level players play in 2nd tier shoes. They never seemed to bother them. Remember the shoes McEnroe and Borg wore in the 70's? Every tennis shoe in the market right now is much more advanced than them, but those guys seemed to move around fine.
 
#18
Just want to throw my 2 cents in this thread.

The only things you should NEVER skimp out on are your shoes, your bed, and your chair. (I extend this to socks as well).

You spend 100% of your life in these categories. Either on your feet, sleeping, or working/sitting in your chair. I find that when you live life by this mantra, you live comfortably.

tldr, Skim elsewhere, SPEND on shoes.
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
#19
Spend on shoes, but do not be swayed by the marketing. The shoes nowadays are very well made, and you should be concerned with several things that are not a function of the price alone.

IMO, the most important things in the order I list them are>

1) FIT

If it doesn't fit you well, don't buy it. You will suffer, your health will suffer, and you will waste your money

2) Stability

Buy shoes that provide good stability. You will do a lot of running, sudden changing of directions etc and the last thing you want is that your shoes have too much "give"

3) Comfort

Buy comfortable shoes, with good cushioning.

4) materials (durability guarantee)

Buy good materials and guarantee where possible, especially if you are wearing through shoes fast

If you are older 3 might be more important than 2 or even 1 ( if it comes to that ). Read about the different types of shoes, and look for those that suit your game. Most expensive doesn't mean the best for you, and that is all you should be concerned about.


:cool:
 
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#20
Just want to throw my 2 cents in this thread.

The only things you should NEVER skimp out on are your shoes, your bed, and your chair. (I extend this to socks as well).

You spend 100% of your life in these categories. Either on your feet, sleeping, or working/sitting in your chair. I find that when you live life by this mantra, you live comfortably.

tldr, Skim elsewhere, SPEND on shoes.
You seem to be under the impression that more expensive is always better. That's not always the case. In the case of tennis shoes, price is often dictated more by marketing than by manufacturing cost or quality. The most expensive shoes are the ones endorsed by the pros. The company pays big money for them to wear the shoes (thus the need for high prices), and the shoes are designed for their game. Do you think a typical middle aged club player has the same needs as Novak Djokovic? No way! I happen to live near a tennis community where the average age is probably north of 60. Most of these older players are wearing big, heavy shoes (Nike Monarch type) that a pro would never consider. They cost about half as much as the top tier shoes, but these shoes are perfect for them because they are roomy, comfortable, and have a lot of cushion to protect their knees which are often in support braces. Picking the most expensive shoe is not always the right way to go. It's best to find the right shoe for yourself, and that's not necessarily going to be a top tier model.
 
#21
Thank you all for your feedback and opinions. I would like to point out again that I've incorrectly mentioned "insole" when I would like to refer to wear on the outsole on the side of the thumb toe. It seems that there isn't any unanimous answer.

If you are older 3 might be more important than 2 or even 1 ( if it comes to that ).
I'm 30. I'm not going to win Australian Open at age 37 like Federer, but I still want to play tournaments - I'm playing them, actually.

I'll take a look and try to give my concerns/agreements to every opinion here, but later. I'll have to run for another practice match today ;)
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
#22
I went to a TW competitor and tried on many pairs of shoes. You all know the place. It's an hour or so from me in Cincinnati. The pair I liked the best were some of the least expensive. They were lightweight and comfy. The fit was good too.

About me: I'm almost 47. I had foot surgery last year for plantar facsia release as my PF was very, very bad. I developed a neuroma. I wear custom, very expensive, orthotics. I find shoes that fit and are comfortable and stick with them for as long as possible. I used to run distance and now I've backed off for many reasons.

I like the Nike Court Lite shoes. They fit my orthotics and I find their durability to be as good as an Court Ballistic I've owned. My orthotics never fit the CB that great. When weighing the cost, it's a no brainer to get two pairs for $100 or one for $100+ with or without a warranty redemption which can be a pita. My latest favorite shoe is the Adidas Barricade Club which is also not expensive but lightweight, breathable, and super comfy compared to others. They were the ones I liked the best after trying on a dozen pairs in Cincinnati. One of my friends had the same shoes on nad he called them his "cheap" shoes. I don't like heavy shoes. I don't like high heel lifts either.

To all of you out there..... Try on the shoes and walk around the store. Buy the ones that feel the best. If that's not an option, good luck. Read reviews and maybe you'll just get lucky.
 
#23
NO! Pricier shoes do not mean better quality. Try them on first. However, buying more expensive shoes when on sale is not bad. Buying cheaply prices shoes is an issue. I have never seen a cheap pair of tennis shoes that feels good when you put them on.
 

mxmx

Professional
#24
You're entitled to your own opinion, but my views differ. You'll get a lot of differing opinions on the comfort of the Barricades. When TW did a review on the Barricade 2015, I think they gave it a 4.7 out of 5 for comfort and that was probably the highest score of the year. The current version has a lower score, but again, comfort is subjective and dependent on individual tastes and foot shapes. I kind of like the secure feeling they have.

Your statement on cheaper models being heavy is not backed up by evidence. If you get on TW and look at the 3 biggest names (Nike, Adidas, and Asics), you'll notice that many of the shoes under $80 are actually quite light, often around 13 oz or less. If anything, the shoes seem to get lighter as they get cheaper because a lot of them are take down models where certain materials are removed to cut costs. Look at Asics. The $65 Gel Dedicate is 12.0 oz while the top-of-the-line speed shoe, the Solutions Speed FF is 12.3 oz. If you want their lightest tennis shoe, you actually have to buy the cheap one!

I do agree that discounted old models are a great buy. I mentioned that in my previous post.

As for level of play, I've seen 5.0 level players play in 2nd tier shoes. They never seemed to bother them. Remember the shoes McEnroe and Borg wore in the 70's? Every tennis shoe in the market right now is much more advanced than them, but those guys seemed to move around fine.
The $65 range are the ones I recommended if you are not a toe dragger. They are almost as comfortable as top of the range except they do not last as long...ie just below the pro level top of the range.

The shoes I have a problem with are those that look like shoes that were made in the 80's (fake leather look and bottom of the range around $45).

EDit: If you hardly ever play get anything cheap. But if you're serious and play a lot, you will soon see the light because generally you get what you pay for. There are very few cheap shoes that properly protect the toe box. You are lucky if you are not a toe dragger as you would get away with a lot more options.
 
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#25
Pricey shoes in the pass were better looking, more comfortable and last longer too. Not the case with the new style tennis shoes made of 3/4 mesh top. Just junk and if it rains or snows your foot is soaked!
 
#26
The $65 range are the ones I recommended if you are not a toe dragger. They are almost as comfortable as top of the range except they do not last as long...ie just below the pro level top of the range.

The shoes I have a problem with are those that look like shoes that were made in the 80's (fake leather look and bottom of the range around $45).

EDit: If you hardly ever play get anything cheap. But if you're serious and play a lot, you will soon see the light because generally you get what you pay for. There are very few cheap shoes that properly protect the toe box. You are lucky if you are not a toe dragger as you would get away with a lot more options.
I guess we can agree that there are cheap shoes for serious players, cheap shoes for older players, and then there's the $20 big box specials for purely recreational players who just need something to protect their feet. The longest lasting shoes are usually premium priced shoes, but you can sometimes get bargains on those shoes if you look for sales on discontinued or unpopular models and colorways. I've seen Lotto Raptors on sale for $49 and those are shoes that pros wear.

My main point really is that it's not always necessary to pay top dollar for tennis shoes. You can look for bargains, and if you're willing to give up something (ie. durability in areas you don't need it) there's less expensive shoes for that. Some people need a really rock solid durable shoe if they want to keep it for over a month, but some people can wear the same shoes for over a year. Unless you're a 4.5+ singles player, the shoes the pros wear may not actually be appropriate for you. There are shoes designed for the needs of less serious players, and they usually cost less than the shoes the pros wear.
 
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swizzy

Hall of Fame
#27
find a shoe that fits your particular foot well.. for me it was the cage2.. the cage 3 is snug, it hurts a bit until it stretches out a little..then it is even better than the 2.. and then become super loyal to that shoe and scoop up pairs on clearance. i have never paid more than $80 for a pair and very often $60. Nike is great. This particular shoe is guaranteed for 6 months on the sole.. which is about 2-3 months longer than it takes to go through the sole. Send them in and you get $130 to buy more shoes or gear. Once i burned through the outer before the sole gave out.. and the store i bought them from returned my purchase price as defective. Best policy and customer service I have ever seen.. wore all kinds of shoes over 35 years and found nothing to compare. Been loyal to the cage for the last 12 years and can't complain. Tennis players spend more cash on shoes than just about anything.. only strings might come close. For that- get a machine and do your own..pays for itself in no time.
 
#28
It depends.

You don't need the most expensive shoe especially if its only because of the way it looks. Plenty of comfortable shoes that are lower priced. What's more important is how it fits you cause its probably the most important equipment next to racquets.

If you play often it will wear out after 6+ months and if you need more cushion you can try different insoles. For me its not worth buying 100+ dollar shoes when some previous year models drop in price every time new one comes out.
 
#29
I think there is a lot of confusion here.

a/ Most Expensive Shoes ... $250
b/ Most Expensive Shoes you can afford ... $150
c/ Lower Priced Option ... $100

If all fit well and are comfortable, identify the real differences between b/ and c/.
If b/ is clearly superior to c/ then I would purchase b/.
If not, I would consider c/ but I would have to understand why c/ is less expensive. (If it is simply because they are old models, fine. But if it is because the materials are inferior, I would probably stick with b/.)

That's what I mean when I say, "Buy the most expensive shoes YOU can afford".
 
#31
I always wear out the outsole under my right big toe, similar to you image. I think this is due to hitting pinpoint serves and playing on sand paper (=hard courts). In the past I've sometimes used Shoegoo (a brand of shoe glue) to cover the area, but it last less than one hour of play, so does not really make sense (I still use the product, but not on tennis shoe soles).

https://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Durability_Guaranteed_Mens_Tennis_Shoes/catpage-MSDURGUAR.html
I use a patch cut from a tire inner tube and use Marine "Goop" to secure it (under pressure)..yeah I'm frugal and retired and have recently found out the consequences of playing with a pair of sneeks with an exposed patch of second layer foam sole....not good....but my patch wears really well and keeps me on the court with less pressure on my wallet....Since my choice of shoe has leather uppers...I resent sometimes just breaking in the shoe then have to ditch the shoe when the upper is hardly worn.....I'm getting good at this and may offer my services along with racquet restringing..Ha!
 
#33
I hear you young guys with disposable income and in the prime of life.... I would rather play everyday and not work and wear my cool shoes with my own funky mods(gel inserts and butyl rubber repairs} than pay 100 bucks and up everytime I expose a patch of the undersole and risk a turned ankle.....Support TW with all their wonderful shoes racquets and such...I just cant participate at the level I might like....go pats!
 
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#34
Hello there,

I've seen a few threads on this subject before, but they were kind of old and I'm interested in knowing if the opinion has changed.

I've been playing for the last 10 months or so and I usually play 3 or 4 times per week, at a minimum. In my "shoe department" I have a pair of Nike Court Lite and a pair of Adidas Barricade court. Since I know they won't last for long, I have another pair of Court Lite and a pair of Asics Gel Dedicate 5 stocked up.

Since usually I wear out the "in-sole" and that I haven't that much money to spend on shoes, are pricier options worth the money? I understand that they might be better made but if a 100€ pair of shoes lasts the same as a 30€ pair of shoes.. might not be worth it.

Hope to hear all the nice feedback!

Cheers!
Most expensive does not always mean best quality. Go to some some stores and see which brand fits your individual foot the best. Then go on the internet and search for that brand but in a model a year or two old because they drop the price significantly all because of a change of color. You can find MSRP $120 shoes for $70.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

mhkeuns

Hall of Fame
#35
Hello there,

I've seen a few threads on this subject before, but they were kind of old and I'm interested in knowing if the opinion has changed.

I've been playing for the last 10 months or so and I usually play 3 or 4 times per week, at a minimum. In my "shoe department" I have a pair of Nike Court Lite and a pair of Adidas Barricade court. Since I know they won't last for long, I have another pair of Court Lite and a pair of Asics Gel Dedicate 5 stocked up.

Since usually I wear out the "in-sole" and that I haven't that much money to spend on shoes, are pricier options worth the money? I understand that they might be better made but if a 100€ pair of shoes lasts the same as a 30€ pair of shoes.. might not be worth it.

Hope to hear all the nice feedback!

Cheers!
I would wear just about anything - basketball shoes, cross-trainer and tennis shoes. I began searching for the better shoes as soon as my knees and feet began to get pain after playing matches. What I found is that the top of the line shoes, like the Asics Gel Resolution 7, not only gives the proper cushioning and support, they were built better and lasted longer. You will definitely benefit from wearing the best available shoes. If you really want to play well, I think the shoes are more important than the rackets, honestly.
 

McLovin

Hall of Fame
#36
Briefly scanned through the responses, so if this was mentioned already, I apologize...

I always wear the 'top line' model from my favorite manufacturers (Asics, Nike), but they're always the old colorways, and normally an additional % off the shown price. It takes a bit of a commitment, but at least once a week I do my normal scan through the interwebs looking for clearance deals. If I find a good deal, I normally will 'stock up' and grab a few pairs (at 50, my feet aren't growing any more...).

Another option is knowing that some manufacturers have 'Unisex' sizing, meaning the men's & women's shoes are identical. You just have to adjust for the sizing. For example, the Nike Cage line. These shoes:

Are listed at $70. If you subtract 1.5 from the women's size, you get a men's size. So the size women's 12 would be a men's 10.5. Can you tell they are a women's colorway? I certainly can't.
 

kimguroo

Hall of Fame
#37
I think this thread is for expensive/top line of shoes are worth it or not.
It’s not “how to shop” wisely.

I strongly believe “you will get what you paid for” haha.
I tried cheaper version shoes and tried a few times then always go to goodwill stores.
Biggest reason might be material. Midsole is not same, stiffer feeling, and outsole is also wearing out faster.
Everyone has different physical shape and condition so shoes might be one of the myth which can not be really answered but I want to play tennis as long as I can and protect my body as much as possible so spending extra money to get highend shoes are worth it for me. Even I try to replace my shoes maximum of 130hrs, if outsole is not worn out but most of time outsole is gone before 130hrs. Around 120 hrs, I get knee pain then just replace shoes and knee pain is usually gone with new shoes. Higher end shoes might be much cheaper than hospital expenses haha.

Regarding on how to shop....
Just buy previous season shoes for discounts, weird colors, women’s shoes might be good option too.
Looks like OP does not live in US so warranty might not be option but if anyone lives in US, warranty shoes are always good option. Nike has most generous warranty and their voucher system is the best since you can buy other items and no expiration date.
 
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