Prince 2018

DanS

Semi-Pro
It doesn't look like it would be my kind of frame, but definitely interesting stuff! I was hoping we'd hear something about the Tour line replacements by now!
 

chrisb

Semi-Pro
Question to the brethren on this site. As a player that started in the 50s with wood t hat merely had to choose from the American style frames or the slightly smaller head foreign frames who a teaching pro that changed frames every time Wilson Prince or Head came out with new frames, other than wt and balance points and string patterns which are obvious it seems to me that most of the creative designs and added bells and whistles that are produced today are mainly just that bells and whistles. I understand that changing the flex will alter the playing characteristic, but don`t we actually adjust intuitively to the frame we use and therefore can adapt to virtually every frame produced. The prices of these bells and whistles have increased at an alarming rate. If you are a recreational player you only need a frame, a league player that has stringing available can suffice on 2 frames. A competitive tourny player needs 4 to 6 frames with differentials in tensions to adjust for particular conditions. The pricing patterns by manufacturers were generally set to cater to each group. Today a Fed frame costs 240+$ per frame. Isn`t this becoming another limitation on the growth of this game? I am in my mid 70s now and am still a solid 4.5 player. I play 5 or 6 times per week. I have watched the different booms and lulls in the growth of this game over the course of my 65 years playing. It seems to me that the game is really in a tailspin at least where I live. The only kids I see playing today are upper middle to rich kids that can afford the high cost of equipment and training, senior players are turning to pickle ball as a less expensive alternative. So my questions are this, am I accurate in what I am viewing, and are their any things that can be done to reverse this trend if I am in fact accurate in what I am perceiving.
 

DJ-

Hall of Fame
Product explanation
Full length:27.0inch (686mm)A balance point:325mmHead size:100 square inchesMean weight (frame):290 gSwing weight:282Material:Highly elastic carbonA grip size:G1,G2,G3A string pattern:16*18Recommended tension:50 ± 5lbsFrame thickness:24.5-24.5-20 .0mmTechnology:Twist power technology, parallel hall, two pieces slotA frame color:BlackA cover:Exclusive フルケース (black)A power level:880The best match strings:HARRIER POWERA grip:RESI PRORemarks:Smart tennis sensor-adaptive model
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
Question to the brethren on this site. As a player that started in the 50s with wood t hat merely had to choose from the American style frames or the slightly smaller head foreign frames who a teaching pro that changed frames every time Wilson Prince or Head came out with new frames, other than wt and balance points and string patterns which are obvious it seems to me that most of the creative designs and added bells and whistles that are produced today are mainly just that bells and whistles. I understand that changing the flex will alter the playing characteristic, but don`t we actually adjust intuitively to the frame we use and therefore can adapt to virtually every frame produced. The prices of these bells and whistles have increased at an alarming rate. If you are a recreational player you only need a frame, a league player that has stringing available can suffice on 2 frames. A competitive tourny player needs 4 to 6 frames with differentials in tensions to adjust for particular conditions. The pricing patterns by manufacturers were generally set to cater to each group. Today a Fed frame costs 240+$ per frame. Isn`t this becoming another limitation on the growth of this game? I am in my mid 70s now and am still a solid 4.5 player. I play 5 or 6 times per week. I have watched the different booms and lulls in the growth of this game over the course of my 65 years playing. It seems to me that the game is really in a tailspin at least where I live. The only kids I see playing today are upper middle to rich kids that can afford the high cost of equipment and training, senior players are turning to pickle ball as a less expensive alternative. So my questions are this, am I accurate in what I am viewing, and are their any things that can be done to reverse this trend if I am in fact accurate in what I am perceiving.
Tennis is big in the Asian regions now! China, Russia and Japan. In the U.S., it is Soccer! Most people who try tennis usually do not belong to a club but it seems to me that a majority of people now do! It still viewed as an “affluent” sport. But one can pick up either a Target, Walmart sold new tennis racquet for under $50 that is already pre-strung. Does not get any better deal then that for tennis racquet equipment unless you get it at garage sale.
 

chrisb

Semi-Pro
Tennis is big in the Asian regions now! China, Russia and Japan. In the U.S., it is Soccer! Most people who try tennis usually do not belong to a club but it seems to me that a majority of people now do! It still viewed as an “affluent” sport. But one can pick up either a Target, Walmart sold new tennis racquet for under $50 that is already pre-strung. Does not get any better deal then that for tennis racquet equipment unless you get it at garage sale.
A basketball costs 15 to 25 and u can go to park and get game, most every school have hoops. Point is you can get a game. I look at local tennis courts (long Island) not the case. People come up to courts with partners U can`t just go to park and pick up a game. Worse for kids. The courts are mostly in disrepair. The baseball lax and soccer facilities are impeccably groomed. But again most all are organized not pick up. Meaning more expense. The public instruction for tennis is abominable . The methodology is straight from 50s taught mostly by untrained instructors . The pro instruction in indoor clubs is expensive and their is great variation in level of competency. In all the tennis is decreasing on exponential numbers. The senior population seem to be into pickleball cheaper easier to play and easier to get pickup
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
Anyone know what the name of this black Prince racquet? It looks like it is built to take on the Babolat Pure Drive and Aero, Wilson Tour Countervail models along with the Head Extreme series too.
 

DanS

Semi-Pro
Anyone know what the name of this black Prince racquet? It looks like it is built to take on the Babolat Pure Drive and Aero, Wilson Tour Countervail models along with the Head Extreme series too.
The Japanese version is the X100 according to the video posted above. I don't know if it's ever going to make it to the US, or what it will be called for sure, but the name Twist keeps coming up?
 

PBODY99

Legend
The Twist series should be released on 3 Aug 2018 in Japan, if my google skills are correct
https://princetennis.jp/product/7tj083
¥ 40,000
About $358 us
Twist Power Technology and a 27-25 mm boxed face are super rackets that will help us in every aspect of the doubles. Lineup of 290 g and 270 g.


 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
The Twist series should be released on 3 Aug 2018 in Japan, if my google skills are correct
https://princetennis.jp/product/7tj083
¥ 40,000
About $358 us
Twist Power Technology and a 27-25 mm boxed face are super rackets that will help us in every aspect of the doubles. Lineup of 290 g and 270 g.


Prince should keep the MSRP and from time to time offer it at deep discount for a short time frame like a two weeks. In that fashion, they can do a short run order and save money, very little inventory storage.
 

hurworld

Hall of Fame
Question to the brethren on this site. As a player that started in the 50s with wood t hat merely had to choose from the American style frames or the slightly smaller head foreign frames who a teaching pro that changed frames every time Wilson Prince or Head came out with new frames, other than wt and balance points and string patterns which are obvious it seems to me that most of the creative designs and added bells and whistles that are produced today are mainly just that bells and whistles. I understand that changing the flex will alter the playing characteristic, but don`t we actually adjust intuitively to the frame we use and therefore can adapt to virtually every frame produced. The prices of these bells and whistles have increased at an alarming rate. If you are a recreational player you only need a frame, a league player that has stringing available can suffice on 2 frames. A competitive tourny player needs 4 to 6 frames with differentials in tensions to adjust for particular conditions. The pricing patterns by manufacturers were generally set to cater to each group. Today a Fed frame costs 240+$ per frame. Isn`t this becoming another limitation on the growth of this game? I am in my mid 70s now and am still a solid 4.5 player. I play 5 or 6 times per week. I have watched the different booms and lulls in the growth of this game over the course of my 65 years playing. It seems to me that the game is really in a tailspin at least where I live. The only kids I see playing today are upper middle to rich kids that can afford the high cost of equipment and training, senior players are turning to pickle ball as a less expensive alternative. So my questions are this, am I accurate in what I am viewing, and are their any things that can be done to reverse this trend if I am in fact accurate in what I am perceiving.
Agreed. Accessibility (either equipment, courts, or coach) is tennis's biggest problem in gaining popularity compared to other sports.
 

mhkeuns

Hall of Fame
Question to the brethren on this site. As a player that started in the 50s with wood t hat merely had to choose from the American style frames or the slightly smaller head foreign frames who a teaching pro that changed frames every time Wilson Prince or Head came out with new frames, other than wt and balance points and string patterns which are obvious it seems to me that most of the creative designs and added bells and whistles that are produced today are mainly just that bells and whistles. I understand that changing the flex will alter the playing characteristic, but don`t we actually adjust intuitively to the frame we use and therefore can adapt to virtually every frame produced. The prices of these bells and whistles have increased at an alarming rate. If you are a recreational player you only need a frame, a league player that has stringing available can suffice on 2 frames. A competitive tourny player needs 4 to 6 frames with differentials in tensions to adjust for particular conditions. The pricing patterns by manufacturers were generally set to cater to each group. Today a Fed frame costs 240+$ per frame. Isn`t this becoming another limitation on the growth of this game? I am in my mid 70s now and am still a solid 4.5 player. I play 5 or 6 times per week. I have watched the different booms and lulls in the growth of this game over the course of my 65 years playing. It seems to me that the game is really in a tailspin at least where I live. The only kids I see playing today are upper middle to rich kids that can afford the high cost of equipment and training, senior players are turning to pickle ball as a less expensive alternative. So my questions are this, am I accurate in what I am viewing, and are their any things that can be done to reverse this trend if I am in fact accurate in what I am perceiving.
The racket cost isn’t really the problem, imo. The cost was more burdensome in the 80’s. I think it’s the lack of exposure (*just like boxing) is the reason for the decline of popularity. It is more intimidating to pick up a racket and start playing than start playing soccer or basketball, imo, and that’s another reason for being not as popular as the popular team sports.

Also, it’s a sport where just taking the group lessons just might not do enough to actually see the improvements. The private lessons and such is a burden, too.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
Tennis has gone from being a relatively inexpensive to a relatively expensive sport just as highly profitable sports have invested massively in making their codes accessible to all.

Countries where national associations invest heavily will do well and others will not, and some will try to pick winners early and focus their investment but over time this will prove inadequate.
 

beltsman

Legend
So does graphene and countervail, but then they would have no reason to charge more for their state of the art technologies!
I have no preference with Wilson or Head, but Textreme is utter garbage. I haven't hit with a single good Textreme racquet. Incredibly disappointing.
 
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