Pro Kennex Tournament Classic and Targa 90, Actually 98 Head Size?

lstewart

Semi-Pro
I picked up 4 classic frames at Goodwill Saturday. Two were Pro Kennex models with the exact same head size and frame dimensions. One was a Tournament Classic, and one was a Targa 90. The Targa 90 says it is a 90 inch frame, but both look to be 98 inches. I held it next to my Yonex 98 inch Ezone frames and the sizes were identical. I hit with them yesterday with the old synthetic gut, then strung the Tournament Classic last night with my usual hybrid set-up. Has anyone else noticed old Pro Kennex frames being listed as 90's, but actually larger than that size?
 

Zoolander

Hall of Fame
Yep the PK destinys were marketed as 95 but were actually 100. Though 8 inches seems a big difference!

If your really interested, then post a pic here of your racquet and a ruler, like this one, nice and big.....



I can guesstimate the actual headsize with autocad if theres a ruler in the pic.
 

lstewart

Semi-Pro
Weird... I usually have just been able to glance at a frame at tell you what it was from a size standpoint, but this has me less certain. The two Pro Kennex frames are identical head size. The Targa says it is a 90. Holding them up to my current Yonez DR 98, they are exactly the same head size. I guess they made a 98 and called it a 90!
 

Don't Let It Bounce

Hall of Fame
The much more recent 5G Pro is listed at 100 sq" but, with its face being 328 mm x 241 mm, is closer to 96 sq in. Manufacturer listings aren't always reliable, probably because a particular head size is more likely to get the attention of a particular player type.

OP, you can always use the area of ellipse formula: just measure the string bed at its (a) widest and (b) longest, divide each measurement by 2, convert each measurement to inches (25.4 mm to 1 inch), and multiply those two halved measurements times pi. So, head size = (0.5*a)*(0.5*b)*3.14. There was a great thread years ago in which TT user Jack & Coke used Photoshop to get precise measurements of string area, and even though most racket heads are imperfect ellipses, I found that simple formula to yield the same result as J&C's method – to the nearest square inch, anyway.
 
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