Pro Stringer Platinum 2.0 - any reason not to get??

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Deleted member 780178

Guest
doesn't seem there are too many posts on the current 2.0 version of the pro stringer platinum - from what I can tell it has some decent improvements over the first version.

Anyone who has experience with the 2.0 machine - is there any reason not to get this over a more traditional/less portable electronic machine under $1k? e.g. a penta premium 3600 with upgraded clamps (or similarly priced machine) + a Wise 2086 as the tensioner

How does the tensioner compare with the series 14 Wise 2086 tensioner (apart from not having pre-stretching options)? Is it accurate?

Is it a linear or rotational pull?

Is the special 2-mount system as good as they claim it to be? How does it compare to a 6-mount system?

How's the quality of the rest of the product?

Seems like it has few trade-offs compared to a traditional stringer, and the obvious plus being it's very portable :unsure:

Plus apparently there's lot of ATP/WTA pros using it - so if it's good enough for them...

Would greatly appreciate some input from you experts, cheers!
 
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Folsom_Stringer_Musa

Professional
How does the tensioner compare with the series 14 Wise 2086 tensioner (apart from not having pre-stretching options)? Is it accurate?
Wise 2086 will be way more solid tensioning unit that Pro Stringer.
Wise 2086 has been in the market for so many years, it has proven itself.
There are highly experienced stringers here who has 10k+ pulls on Wise and still work.

Is it a linear or rotational pull?
Pro Stringer will be rotational where as Wise will be liner.
This is AFAIK on older pro Stringer..

Is the special 2-mount system as good as they claim it to be? How does it compare to a 6-mount system?
This 2 pt mounting system is for a stringer\player who travels and need lighter package.
It will do the job but no match for a good\solid 6 pt mounting system.


How's the quality of the rest of the product?
I saw some folks using the older version for 7+ years. So it works for sure.
Some stringer had complains about the tension gauge/indicator but that has improved in later version I believe.

Plus apparently there's lot of ATP/WTA pros using it - so if it's good enough for them...
I don't know which Pros using it, but I saw some SA WTA players using it on tour.

Hope it helps.
 

Folsom_Stringer_Musa

Professional
I don't know where you got that from - I think it's a rumor.
Btw - do you really want to string with such a thing?
What options are out there for someone who travels on tour and wants to string his\her own frame in ECP?

Stringway may be a better option given the price and built quality but not ECP.
 
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Deleted member 780178

Guest
I don't know where you got that from - I think it's a rumor.
on their official website they mention "Trusted by over 700+ professional players" - no clue how many are actually ATP/WTA, but they also seem to have testimonials from players like Sinner etc. listed on the website.


Btw - do you really want to string with such a thing?
eh I mean not really...from the point of it not being a conventional method and it looking a bit finnicky/messy. BUT, if it gets the job done as well they claim (i.e. being accurate and reasonably quick enough - a big IF mind you) then I could be willing to adapt.

The main draw for me is the clear portability of the machine compared to conventional stringers (living in a smaller space), though I understand most may not have this concern so a conventional machine is the tried and tested way to go.

anyway thanks for chiming in, seems like a rather divisive product around here.
 
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Folsom_Stringer_Musa

Professional
on their official website they mention "Trusted by over 700+ professional players" - no clue how many are actually ATP/WTA, but they also seem to have testimonials from players like Sinner etc. listed on the website.




eh I mean not really...from the point of it not being a conventional method and it looking a bit finnicky/messy. BUT, if it gets the job done as well they claim (i.e. being accurate and reasonably quick enough - a big IF mind you) then I could be willing to adapt.

The main draw for me is the clear portability of the machine compared to conventional stringers (living in a smaller space), though I understand most may not have this concern so a conventional machine is tried and tested way to go.

anyway thanks for chiming in, seems like a rather divisive product around here.
I think PS 2.0 is over priced given what I see.
But again Wise 2086 unit costs ~$650 alone, but that is Wise.
 
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Deleted member 780178

Guest
Thanks a bunch for the info!

Stringway may be a better option given the price and built quality but not ECP.
Actually I was also strongly considering the Stringway MS140 as another option (albeit slightly larger/heavier, still portable though). On their website they mention it has a "Very accurate and very reliable spring-driven constant pull system." - not sure how reliable it may be in relation to the Wise.

On the other end, a drop-weight is mechanical constant pull and can be accurate enough (given it is used correctly) but is just slow. A spring-driven constant pull is an interesting mechanism, wonder how the speed of stringing compares.
 

loosegroove

Hall of Fame
Thanks a bunch for the info!



Actually I was also strongly considering the Stringway MS140 as another option (albeit slightly larger/heavier, still portable though). On their website they mention it has a "Very accurate and very reliable spring-driven constant pull system." - not sure how reliable it may be in relation to the Wise.

On the other end, a drop-weight is mechanical constant pull and can be accurate enough (given it is used correctly) but is just slow. A spring-driven constant pull is an interesting mechanism, wonder how the speed of stringing compares.
Here's a quick review I did of the MS140 if you're interested: REVIEW
 

Tregix

Rookie
On their website they mention it has a "Very accurate and very reliable spring-driven constant pull system." - not sure how reliable it may be in relation to the Wise.
Probably more reliable. A spring is someting extremily simple, reliable and accurate (in its linearity domain). An electronic tensioning system is much more complexe with different sensors, a motor etc.
 

temnik

New User
I think PS 2.0 is over priced given what I see.
But again Wise 2086 unit costs ~$650 alone, but that is Wise.
Is it possible to use Wise 2086 with the same principle as PS? Using racquet frame as an immobilizer? I figure, that 2pt mounting system can't be worth more than $50...
 

fritzhimself

Semi-Pro
HOW TO STRING A TENNIS RACQUET USING PRO STRINGER PLATINUM & CLAWS (FLYING CLAMPS) -- PRO STRINGER - YouTube

Anyone who has ever strung a tennis racket while sitting down will know how excruciating this process is. Every occupational physician cries out for help.
You don't have to be an expert to see that the middle string - shown with the green arrow at sec. 37 - never gets the intended tension weight - and that's not even possible as shown in the video.
The joke is, there is a flying clamp on two unstrung strings (in the middle of the racquet to boot?) - and never looked backwards. Otherwise, everyone would realize that this (but otherwise it is not possible) never fixed clamps can hold a candle. Anyway - the good man keeps on stringing (maybe already with enormous back pain?) and starts without startingclamp with a starting knot. The whole thing in and of itself would be nothing at all, if he didn't quite cleverly tighten the first cross string at min 5:00 and then "don't" clamp it - how is that possible? This is circumvented with a clever diversionary maneuver and the second cross string is immediately tightened, suggesting that everything has happened as in real stringing life. In reality, these two strings have not received the planned tension weight.
When you're done with that, and you're tormented by back pain, you throw these stringing cube through the closed window and buy a real stringing machine.
This sales video is made to teach uninformed beginners how to string "wrong". I don't want to call it cheating, but borderline stringing comes very close.
 
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Folsom_Stringer_Musa

Professional
Anyone who has ever strung a tennis racket while sitting down will know how excruciating this process is.
People work for hours sitting, you saying sitting for 40 mins will cause excruciating pain?
PS doesn't have to be at sitting height. You use what is available to you in your room.

Every occupational physician cries out for help.
Why would the physician cry for help?


The joke is, there is a flying clamp on two unstrung strings (in the middle of the racquet to boot?) - and never looked backwards.
That is a drawback of all machines that use flying clamp (AFAIK). You just don't have the luxury of a fixed clamp system.
Do you have other suggestions on how to start the main on the flying clamps machine?
If yes, please share.

Otherwise, everyone would realize that this (but otherwise it is not possible) never fixed clamps can hold a candle.
What is your point?


Anyway - the good man keeps on stringing (maybe already with enormous back pain?) and starts without startingclamp with a starting knot.
I watched the video. He did not show any sign of back pain whatsoever.
Why are you mocking him?
Starting knot is acceptable method for starting cross if someone doesn't have a starting clamp or the player just doesn't want to carry another piece while travelling.

The whole thing in and of itself would be nothing at all, if he didn't quite cleverly tighten the first cross string at min 5:00 and then "don't" clamp it - how is that possible? This is circumvented with a clever diversionary maneuver and the second cross string is immediately tightened, suggesting that everything has happened as in real stringing life. In reality, these two strings have not received the planned tension weight.
Can you tighten the first cross perfectly and clamp with a flying clamp?

When you're done with that, and you're tormented by back pain, you throw these stringing cube through the closed window and buy a real stringing machine.
You want everyone to travel with a ~70lb real machine?

These machines are not for everyone. The guy in the video will play with that racket he is stringing.

You are nobody to tell him what is right for him.

You have a nasty habit of denigrating other people/machines which are not as good as yours.
This is my observation.
 

fritzhimself

Semi-Pro
........ each one is the architect of his own fortune.
If you want to work with such a nonsense, that's your business - I won't have anything like that in my house.
What problem do you have when I write how I feel about this system?
 

Folsom_Stringer_Musa

Professional
........ each one is the architect of his own fortune.
If you want to work with such a nonsense, that's your business - I won't have anything like that in my house.
What problem do you have when I write how I feel about this system?
Your complains were mainly about the stringer and the process. Not the machine.

As I said, if you have better process for machine with flying clamp, share with others so that people can see and learn.
 

Sergio Ilini

New User
HOW TO STRING A TENNIS RACQUET USING PRO STRINGER PLATINUM & CLAWS (FLYING CLAMPS) -- PRO STRINGER - YouTube

Anyone who has ever strung a tennis racket while sitting down will know how excruciating this process is. Every occupational physician cries out for help.
You don't have to be an expert to see that the middle string - shown with the green arrow at sec. 37 - never gets the intended tension weight - and that's not even possible as shown in the video.
The joke is, there is a flying clamp on two unstrung strings (in the middle of the racquet to boot?) - and never looked backwards. Otherwise, everyone would realize that this (but otherwise it is not possible) never fixed clamps can hold a candle. Anyway - the good man keeps on stringing (maybe already with enormous back pain?) and starts without startingclamp with a starting knot. The whole thing in and of itself would be nothing at all, if he didn't quite cleverly tighten the first cross string at min 5:00 and then "don't" clamp it - how is that possible? This is circumvented with a clever diversionary maneuver and the second cross string is immediately tightened, suggesting that everything has happened as in real stringing life. In reality, these two strings have not received the planned tension weight.
When you're done with that, and you're tormented by back pain, you throw these stringing cube through the closed window and buy a real stringing machine.
This sales video is made to teach uninformed beginners how to string "wrong". I don't want to call it cheating, but borderline stringing comes very close.
I apologize in advance for my bad english. I pulled my first racket 50 years ago with a stick and sewed by hand. Since then I have pulled rackets on different mechanical and electronic machines (about 20 different) - so I have experience. I designed and built a tennis machine similar to the pro stringer. a distinctive feature is the electronic control with constant tension. By following my experience roadmap (using workarounds) I get results similar to BABOLAT 3 stars. I think the problems of the initial tension of longitudinal strings and the beginning of cross strings can be solved by using a start grip and a specific tension sequence. Frame and rim mount rigidity is not punched using Prince's 4-point mount. The only problem in my opinion is the tension of the string in the neck of the racket - at an angle or through the handle - although this tension can be adjusted empirically. So with certain modifications and stretching techniques, I think these kinds of gadgets are quite suitable for high-quality work. As for your proposal to throw out your iPhone 11 through a closed window and load your 20-meter room IBM from the 80s, I have doubts ...
 
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loosegroove

Hall of Fame
Is it possible to use Wise 2086 with the same principle as PS? Using racquet frame as an immobilizer? I figure, that 2pt mounting system can't be worth more than $50...
Not without fabricating some type of custom bracket/stand, so that the Wise could sit upright on its own at the appropriate height and also brace against the racket head to pull tension. It would be a pretty heavy and cumbersome tensioning device to deal with while stringing.
 

Tennis_dude101

Semi-Pro
Hey prest1g3,
I've been stringing on an original Pro Stringer since 2014. I string for players at two different clubs and no one has complained about the quality of the string jobs the PS produces(bar 1 or 2 rackets that had miss-weaves :oops:).
I upgraded to Stringway Flying clamps a couple of years ago because the original plastic clamps supplied were crap. The new PS Claws are even better than the SW clamps from the reviews I've read, so the clamps won't need upgrading if you get a V2.

TD

PS. I've strung racquets sized from 93" up to the 137" Gamma Big Buba(had to make a racquet bar extension for that one) with it.
 
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Tennis_dude101

Semi-Pro
on their official website they mention "Trusted by over 700+ professional players" - no clue how many are actually ATP/WTA, but they also seem to have testimonials from players like Sinner etc. listed on the website.

eh I mean not really...from the point of it not being a conventional method and it looking a bit finnicky/messy. BUT, if it gets the job done as well they claim (i.e. being accurate and reasonably quick enough - a big IF mind you) then I could be willing to adapt.

The main draw for me is the clear portability of the machine compared to conventional stringers (living in a smaller space), though I understand most may not have this concern so a conventional machine is the tried and tested way to go.

anyway thanks for chiming in, seems like a rather divisive product around here.
A lot of the lower ranked pros travel with them(Futures/Challenger level) as there's not much money at that level thus they do their own stringing on the road.
I bought mine because I don't have room for a big machine at home and it lives in the laundry cupboard when not in use.

TD
 

Sardines

Hall of Fame
I just updated our review of the Pro Stringer 2.0 last year, which we bought specifically for the portability of the system and small footprint.
The 6 vs 2 mount system is about the longevity of the racquet frame and prevention of warping of the frame during stringing. My racquets don't feel that much different not has the head shape differed from a 6 pt restring. Nor has the machine left any marks on the paint.
Sitting while threading the crosses was faster than standing, and definitely more comfortable for my height. The PS mount is more flexible than a conventional machine so it is possible to get a comfortable stable position. As per my review, you will need some extra tools to make it work well.
doesn't seem there are too many posts on the current 2.0 version of the pro stringer platinum - from what I can tell it has some decent improvements over the first version.

Anyone who has experience with the 2.0 machine - is there any reason not to get this over a more traditional/less portable electronic machine under $1k? e.g. a penta premium 3600 with upgraded clamps (or similarly priced machine) + a Wise 2086 as the tensioner

How does the tensioner compare with the series 14 Wise 2086 tensioner (apart from not having pre-stretching options)? Is it accurate?

Is it a linear or rotational pull?

Is the special 2-mount system as good as they claim it to be? How does it compare to a 6-mount system?

How's the quality of the rest of the product?

Seems like it has few trade-offs compared to a traditional stringer, and the obvious plus being it's very portable :unsure:

Plus apparently there's lot of ATP/WTA pros using it - so if it's good enough for them...

Would greatly appreciate some input from you experts, cheers!
 

hadoken

Semi-Pro
I am sure the Pro Stringer does a reliable job...if space and portability is extremely important to you then I am sure it's fine...but at the end of the day you are stringing on a floating clamp system with the Pro Stringer and everyone who has strung with any sort of frequency will tell you they prefer a fixed clamp system if they can get it. If I were to drop ~1K on a stringer where portability was a very strong need, I probably would go with a Stringway MS100 which isn't the lightest system but certainly quite accurate and makes dropweight stringing 'tolerable'.
 

Sardines

Hall of Fame
I think the problem with opinions is that most have never actually used the Pro Stringer and everyone will recommend what they know and own, and justifiably so. My kids and I actually tried Gamma's X-ELS, among other brands as well, but returned them due to the foot print, which prohibits easy travel on planes.
OP, if the setup is primarily for home use only, a drop weight with fixed clamps is probably the better choice. For portability, it's tough to beat a 7kg handbag size machine, which my kid has restrung at cafes, a park picnic table, and the hotel room desk. She's restrung between matches when conditions etc changed, on site. There is a money back guarantee for Pro Stringers, and Gammas from Amazon. I don't think it's too unreasonable to try it and take the $100 hit if you don't like it.
 

Folsom_Stringer_Musa

Professional
I just updated our review of the Pro Stringer 2.0 last year, which we bought specifically for the portability of the system and small footprint.
That is their selling point as well.

My racquets don't feel that much different not has the head shape differed from a 6 pt restring. Nor has the machine left any marks on the paint.
Prince 1000/1500/Ektelon and similar 4 point mounting system are solid.
I have not seen/heard complain of any marks or paint issue either. Though I really don't check for them.

Sitting while threading the crosses was faster than standing, and definitely more comfortable for my height.
Someone was claiming of excruciating pain in this set up. Totally pointless.
I don't think I can weave unless I stand. Glad that it works for you.
 

Sardines

Hall of Fame
SW Clamps are good, but definitely not better.
Strongly agreed. Since I own both Stringway's clamps (something my kids and I actually got that recommendation here, but didn't read the subsequent complaint threads) and compared them to the Pro Stringer claws (standard and giant), no doubt the Pro Stringer claws are much better with "NOT" pulling on strings to fit its dimensions. Instead the PS claws have tapered heads can fit most racquets string gaps, solid design that keeps claw gap adjustment constant. The Stringway knob design doesn't really lock well and down right loose for the triple clamp, so if you accidentally touch the knob, the adjustment shifts. What it does have is thinner teeth, which allows me to put the clamp closer to the grommet on my racquets in the crosses more often than the claw, which is thicker and has difficulty locking down in the corners of my racquets, where the mains get in the way.

Prince 1000/1500/Ektelon and similar 4 point mounting system are solid.
I have not seen/heard complain of any marks or paint issue either. Though I really don't check for them.

Someone was claiming of excruciating pain in this set up. Totally pointless.
I don't think I can weave unless I stand. Glad that it works for you.
I think if 2 pt systems were that problematic, they'd have died long again.
The sitting part is because of the flexibility of the mounting system, and the shallow space between the stringbed and mount. I couldn't sit if the system is mounted on a table over 32", like my work bench, but normal 30" tables are fine. My kids, being shorter, love coffee tables.
That opinion of discomfort from sitting while stringing was conjecture, not tested on a pro stringer. Most stringing machines are standing height anyways. And table top units are higher than the Pro Stringer, so I can see why someone would think it's a problem. My kids have strung out in the parking lot, on a foldable table, powered by an inverter hooked up to my car. Try that on a big stringing machine!
 

jasonfoong

New User
When I saw this post, my 1st reaction = "Oh no, not again, more mud slinging!??"

Like tennisdude, I've ProStringer for 7 years now
Like him, I've done stringing for many players, both social & tournament players
Like him, most of them havent seen my machine or knew what I used (good enough a blind test?)
Some left their regular ProShop (using Technifibre, Bairardo etc machines) & preferred mine

Enough said,
If I say more, some here might accuse I work for ProStringer :)
 

Sardines

Hall of Fame
Well, to be fair, I've not felt such animosity, just opinions, many of them without trying the product but based on own experiences and conjecture. That's actually a good thing because it promotes discussion about a product.
Stringing machines just pull tension, with clamps that prevent slippage. Once I find the tension I like from a particular machine, I stick with it. It's as much mental as it is physical. I know I prefer the string job from the Yonex machine more than the Babolat in my pro shop, if done by the same guy. The Pro Stringer, I prefer 1-2 lbs higher and since my kids learnt from my stringer, they do an excellent job of duplicating that job but not without messing with tensions for a few trials. And prestretching my gut is still a pain manually, so I still send my racquets to be strung by the pro for gut poly.
The thread starter, @prest1g3 , prefers an under $500 machine. That's not the pro stringer, but a drop weight machine. The Pro Stringer, like all machines, has pros and cons, some of which only trying the machine will let you see its strengths and weaknesses.
 

Folsom_Stringer_Musa

Professional
That opinion of discomfort from sitting while stringing was conjecture, not tested on a pro stringer. Most stringing machines are standing height anyways. And table top units are higher than the Pro Stringer, so I can see why someone would think it's a problem. My kids have strung out in the parking lot, on a foldable table, powered by an inverter hooked up to my car. Try that on a big stringing machine!
Highly portable unit like PS depends on some table\support to hook onto.
If the height of that support is low, it may be tough to string in standing position.
 

Sardines

Hall of Fame
Highly portable unit like PS depends on some table\support to hook onto.
If the height of that support is low, it may be tough to string in standing position.
Obviously that depends on how tall the person is, and every machine would be an issue for someone? My stringer is 6'4" and he puts his machine on a raised platform so he doesn't have to bend to weave. Likewise, a table top machine can be height adjusted via the choice of table. A height adjustable folding table is all that's needed for table top models. A point about the PS is 24V @ 1.5amp power, and with cafes everywhere it's not a problem. Now that PS even sell a battery pack and a collapsable table, they are really pushing the portability aspect.
 
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Deleted member 780178

Guest
Thanks all for the comments! if I ever need a machine on the go, I think i've narrowed it down to the SW MS140 since I don't plan on constantly moving. It being all mechanical is a nice bonus, and the most major drawback for a portable stringer being its upper tension limit.
 
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