Pro's Pro Comet vs Gamma Progression II 200 for hobby stringing?

#1
For stringing at home (maybe 1-2 racquets per month) and learning as a hobby, would Pro's Pro Comet be better than Gamma Progression ii 200?

Pro's Pro Comet:

Gamma Progression ii 200:

Price-wise the Comet is more expensive than the 200, but not by too much if I get directly from Pro's Pro.

Any advice is much appreciated.
 
#2
The one thing I did not like about the Gamma was the composite clamps. Sometimes it was hard to get them to hold tension without slipping while also not crushing the string.

I think personally from those 2 I would take the comet for that reason.
 
#4
I would also go with the fixed clamp machine.
If you know of any stringer in your area, see if you can watch or even try stringing. If you like it and know you will be stringing for the long haul, your best to get as much machine as you can afford, as it does make the job more enjoyable.
 
#5
I own the comet.It is a very stable machine with six point mounting system and quality fixed swivel clamps.The lockout system is easy and quick to operate.I have not used the drop weight gamma machine but flying clamps is a big disadvantage.I do not know your budget but the price gap between the two machines is around 150 euros if you include the shipping costs..
 
#8
3teeth vs 5teeth clamps.If you like cheap quality drop weight machines,you can wait for a month,pros pro will land challenger x,a new drop weight with fixed clamps,around 250 euros.
I assume 5 teeth means string is better secured in the clamp?

What’s the pros and cons of drop weight vs Comet’s crank?

Pardon my newbie questions here.


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#9
I assume 5 teeth means string is better secured in the clamp?

What’s the pros and cons of drop weight vs Comet’s crank?

Pardon my newbie questions here.


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Yes.There are many threads in this forum regarding the crank-drop weight debate.If you want to string one or two rackets per month a drop weight is not a bad choice.You get constant pulling(less tension loss than cranks) and there is no need for calibration(cranks need from time to time).Cranks are easier in terms of use i think...
 
#11
I assume 5 teeth means string is better secured in the clamp?

What’s the pros and cons of drop weight vs Comet’s crank?

Pardon my newbie questions here.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Cranks are complete junk. Drop much better.

5 teeth are better for tight stringbeds but I think only alpha has those. Still probably need floating clamp supports for mains at very high tensions.

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#13
So in summary, drop weight achieves better tension accuracy but takes longer to do so, and crank is faster and less accurate but tension volatility can be minimised with consistent technique?

Some older threads also mentioned crank-based system would allow for electronic tensioner upgrade in future? I don't think I would do that but I assume that would mean a better resell value.
 
#14
Ask yourself how many frames a day, a week, a month you are likely to do. Then ask yourself how fast do you need to do 1 frame/week, 2 frames/month. If you say 15 minutes/frame, then go for a crank. If you say I do not care, then you can use a drop weight or a crank. Both of your original choices are OK if you fall into the low volume, no time limit category. The post recommending a crank is an attempt to make the experience easier, but is that what you want? I recommend that you just read the sticky about features that can be had on various machines and make up your own mind after that. 3¢
 
#15
So in summary, drop weight achieves better tension accuracy but takes longer to do so, and crank is faster and less accurate but tension volatility can be minimised with consistent technique?
You need to consider the question in the context of the whole machine. For instance, the vast majority (if not all) crank machines come with fixed clamps. Many drop weight machines have flying clamps. The clamping mechanism, and the quality of the clamps themselves, arguably have greater bearing on the final result than the tension head.

With stringing machines, I do believe that there's a large element of you get what you pay for. There's a reason some machines cost more than others. Some of that might be comfort and convenience, but a significant portion of it is build quality.
 
#16
I have a flying clamp/DW machine and have only been stringing for a few months now. In hindsight, I wish I had gotten fixed clamps at a minimum. And likely a crank. if I had all the time in the world to string, I probably wouldn't care. But I don't. I have work, a family, etc. The DW can be tedious to work with to get to your reference tension. It is a slow process. Granted my technique is not great, so it takes me a bit, but even with that improving, I'm sure I'd be faster on a fixed/crank machine.
 
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