Psychologist Opinion Needed...

Cigo

Rookie
Hehehe. I guess the server just glitched or something. Or my oppinion is not shared by the true psychologist(s) who have the powah. :)
 

West Coast Ace

G.O.A.T.
It has nothing to do with sports. It's just part of his personality. If he worked for a big company and was presented an award in front of a big audience, he'd probably shed a few tears.

No big deal - unless your 'ezdude1970' - then it's a huge character flaw. If you're really 35, that's sad.
 

Aykhan Mammadov

Hall of Fame
The fact that he still cryes when he receivs his 7-th GS trophee means he is extra emotional. This is also proved by his defeats to Nadal when he trembles without any reason.
 
It is his dream come true. It's just a concidence it's tennis. What do you want in life? What if you achieved everything your heart desired, you would proablly be emotional too!
 

crazylevity

Hall of Fame
Notice how all previous responses have not dealt with what the OP asked :p

Here's my $0.02 worth: While emotion is highly complex, psychological studies have shown that it is intertwined inextricably with physical arousal. Therefore it is not uncommon to see the body to react in order to cope with emotional changes. It is the same reason why u perspire when you are afraid, your heart beats faster when excited, your eyes dilate when you are nervous etc. It is probable that Federer's release of tension, coupled with happiness, as well as the autonomic nervous system's attempt to bring the body down from a state of very high arousal back to resting state resulted in the emotional outpouring that we saw.
 

quest01

Hall of Fame
I think its great that Federer showed such emotion when he received his trophy. Most players in his situation would of done the same thing. There is nothing wrong with crying. Its actually good for people.
 
quest01 said:
I think its great that Federer showed such emotion when he received his trophy. Most players in his situation would of done the same thing. There is nothing wrong with crying. Its actually good for people.
:confused: That's exactly the reason I posted this thread. There have been other players in his situation before (4 times a year at Grand Slam events), and you rarely see that kind of reaction from other players.
 

diredesire

Adjunct Moderator
If your posts are missing, it could be a result of the server going down and TW having to resort to a backup copy, or if you were using inappropriate/discriminating language.
 

superman1

Legend
1. He's the calmest guy on court you'll find, never gets angry at anyone.
2. In interviews he's always smiling, always good natured.
3. His motto is "It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice."
4. He was very nervous before the match and it's the first time I've seen sweat on his face.
5. He wins his 7th Grand Slam with a ton of resistance.
6. He's greeted by Rod Laver on his way up, tennis legend and the guy he spent time with the other day.
7. Enberg says that "Federer" along with "Sampras" and "Laver" are the only men to win 3 consecutive Slams, or some record like that. Suddenly he hears his name among the greats and knows that "Federer" is going to be referred to in the same vein as those names.
8. The pressure of speaking in front of tens and thousands + millions on TV.

If it was Roddick up there, he'd try to be funny and quick talking in that cocky way of his. If it was Safin, he'd be funny in that relaxed unaware way of his. Hewitt would just go by the book and thank the necessary people. But Federer is obviously a different kind of guy and doesn't try to put up any act.
 
superman1 said:
1. He's the calmest guy on court you'll find, never gets angry at anyone.
2. In interviews he's always smiling, always good natured.
3. His motto is "It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice."
4. He was very nervous before the match and it's the first time I've seen sweat on his face.
5. He wins his 7th Grand Slam with a ton of resistance.
6. He's greeted by Rod Laver on his way up, tennis legend and the guy he spent time with the other day.
7. Enberg says that "Federer" along with "Sampras" and "Laver" are the only men to win 3 consecutive Slams, or some record like that. Suddenly he hears his name among the greats and knows that "Federer" is going to be referred to in the same vein as those names.
8. The pressure of speaking in front of tens and thousands + millions on TV.

If it was Roddick up there, he'd try to be funny and quick talking in that cocky way of his. If it was Safin, he'd be funny in that relaxed unaware way of his. Hewitt would just go by the book and thank the necessary people. But Federer is obviously a different kind of guy and doesn't try to put up any act.
I like that analyse. That's the kind of answer I was looking for. Makes sense to me. Thanks
 

Greengrass

New User
They say that laugh and the world laughs with you - cry and you cry alone. But I think Fed proved the exception to the rule that day - there were a gang of us in the house getting teary-eyed, even the guys!
 

heartman

Rookie
Ah so...

First response in this thread is 100% right on the money. Not as rare as you might think - it can happen at just about any level of competition - in just about any activity - and to individuals capable of uncharacteristic achievement.

I think it's pretty neat -
 

WayneCM

Semi-Pro
there are a few masculinity issues here guys, the crying federer did was of joy, not weakness r being a "pansy", i'm glad that the game still means so much after everything he's one!
 
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