Questions on making micro-adjustments on a klippermate

azntroy103

New User
So I strung like 3 racquets on my klippermate, and so many times the angle of the weight would be just a couple of degrees off, and I would either remove or give a bit more slack, for the weight to be off a couple degrees the other way. my questions are:

1. Does the weight/arm have to be level? if its a couple of degrees off, how much off would the tension be?
2. What is the best way to make small, micro-adjustments?
3. Sometimes, when i bring the weight back to adjust the length of string a bit, the string just comes undone and I have to do the whole thing over again.... Best way to avoid this?

Thank you!
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
The issue is described in a thread called "Physics of a dropweight". Basically you will be off by cos(angle) if the bar is not level or horizontal. 5° is cos(5)=0.9962 or 99.62% of ref tension. If you wanted 50#, you are at 49.8# or err of 0.2#. That's close enough for government estimates. If you are within 10°, that's basically close enuff.
 

aussie

Professional
@esgee48 is spot on. From memory, and I checked this out many years ago, something like the end of the tension bar can be 3 inches above/below horizontal and the tension pulled is more than 99% of the reference tension. That's as accurate as you want when you consider all the other factors that can affect the accuracy of the pulled tension.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Micro adjustment on a KM? Not necessary. If the bar is off by 10 degrees and you’re string at 55# reference tension you will be off by 0.8#. You will lose more tension on the outer mains and crosses due to friction than that. If you want to make up that lost tension just bump up the tension a little bi.
 

azntroy103

New User
The issue is described in a thread called "Physics of a dropweight". Basically you will be off by cos(angle) if the bar is not level or horizontal. 5° is cos(5)=0.9962 or 99.62% of ref tension. If you wanted 50#, you are at 49.8# or err of 0.2#. That's close enough for government estimates. If you are within 10°, that's basically close enuff.
Thanks so much! I was wasting so much time trying to get it perfectly horizontal, knowing that 5 degrees will have that small an impact will make life so much easier
 
The tension you lose on a Klippermate will mostly come from your floating clamps rather than the tensioner itself. Most of the tension you lose will be made up on the next pull, but it's still something to consider, especially if you ever get to the point you want to upgrade your clamps.
 

fritzhimself

Semi-Pro
Hi friends, maybe someone can explain to me why the KM still has so many users? In my eyes, this is not a machine where I want to string racquets.
Would be just like if Ford still offered the Model T.
Can it just be the price? Every day you read about the lack of flying clamps or other problems with this stone age machine and yet it is still used so often.
I mean, there can't be a usable result.
I have been stringing for more than 25 years and have always had a better machine than the KM ever was. Maybe we don't understand this in Europe.
Please don't get me wrong, but where is the secret of the KM?
 

furStringer

New User
Hi friends, maybe someone can explain to me why the KM still has so many users? In my eyes, this is not a machine where I want to string racquets.
Would be just like if Ford still offered the Model T.
Can it just be the price? Every day you read about the lack of flying clamps or other problems with this stone age machine and yet it is still used so often.
I mean, there can't be a usable result.
I have been stringing for more than 25 years and have always had a better machine than the KM ever was. Maybe we don't understand this in Europe.
Please don't get me wrong, but where is the secret of the KM?
Having used one there is an absolutely usable result, having used a better machine but not top of the line I get a similar but more consistent result, and having my rackets done on a star 5, not me stringing but a very good stringer, I get not much better of a result, if noticeable at all. Not sure if that says more about me than the the string job.

So in short the price to do your own strings might be worth it to most people, especially as an intro to stringing, it was for me for a little bit. In hindsight I’d get a better machine day one, but at the time I had no idea I’d even be able to do it or want to do it into the future and the KM was my gateway to this world.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
[1] You live in a tennis wasteland where the nearest stringer is 60 minutes away one way.
[2] You break strings a lot. Or you break strings once-a-year.
[3] Turnaround is 4 days.
[4] You wish to experiment with strings and tension.
[5] You wish to customize your frame.
[6] You are wondering if you can learn to string. Not all people are mechanically inclined or can pay consistent attention to detail.
[7] You live in a small space.
[8] You have a low budget for strings or tennis equipment.
[9] You have a SO.
[10] Power goes out frequently where you live.
I could probably think of more reasons why low cost dropweights exist. :-D8-B
 

yossarian

Professional
Hi friends, maybe someone can explain to me why the KM still has so many users? In my eyes, this is not a machine where I want to string racquets.
Would be just like if Ford still offered the Model T.
Can it just be the price? Every day you read about the lack of flying clamps or other problems with this stone age machine and yet it is still used so often.
I mean, there can't be a usable result.
I have been stringing for more than 25 years and have always had a better machine than the KM ever was. Maybe we don't understand this in Europe.
Please don't get me wrong, but where is the secret of the KM?
It’s relatively inexpensive, it works well, it doesn’t take up much space, it has a lifetime warranty, and it’s made in the US

For people who are just starting out stringing but aren’t sure how much they’ll use it, it’s a good option
 
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