Racquet confusion!

pico

Rookie
Hi guys. Maybe some of you are like me in that I have quite a few racquets and not sure how to stick to just one. So many variables involved with strings and stiffness etc that I can't commit!!! How do you guys deal with this?
 

McLovin

Legend
Actually, I was looking/searching for a while. I'd bounce between something (Dunlop/Srixon, Volkl, Pacific) and my trusty Fischer Pro No 1s.

This past spring I went all-in on the VCORE 98+ and haven't looked back. I did goof around w/ strings for a bit, but now I'm using Laserfirbre Native Tour and loving it.
 

pico

Rookie
I see
Actually, I was looking/searching for a while. I'd bounce between something (Dunlop/Srixon, Volkl, Pacific) and my trusty Fischer Pro No 1s.

This past spring I went all-in on the VCORE 98+ and haven't looked back. I did goof around w/ strings for a bit, but now I'm using Laserfirbre Native Tour and loving it.
Are those racquets similar in terms of stiffness, head size etc or different?
 

McLovin

Legend
I see

Are those racquets similar in terms of stiffness, head size etc or different?
The VCORE 98+ and my Pro No 1s were fairly close in stiffness (low-mid 60s), and both are 98 sq in. The big differences are (a) thinner beam in the VCORE, and (b) 16x19 vs 16x20.

Note that I extended my Fischers, and added weight to my VCOREs, so their weight/swingweights are similar (the Yonex is maybe a tad less in both categories).
 

pico

Rookie
The VCORE 98+ and my Pro No 1s were fairly close in stiffness (low-mid 60s), and both are 98 sq in. The big differences are (a) thinner beam in the VCORE, and (b) 16x19 vs 16x20.

Note that I extended my Fischers, and added weight to my VCOREs, so their weight/swingweights are similar (the Yonex is maybe a tad less in both categories).
How tall are you? Do you find the extended length helps keeping serves in?
 

n8dawg6

Legend
Hi guys. Maybe some of you are like me in that I have quite a few racquets and not sure how to stick to just one. So many variables involved with strings and stiffness etc that I can't commit!!! How do you guys deal with this?
i used to be like you ... lost, searching. afloat at sea without a rudder. up schitt creek with no paddle.

then i bought a bunch of different blades with different weights and string patterns and garbage wilson QC. now in all probability i am more lost than ever.
 

McLovin

Legend
How tall are you? Do you find the extended length helps keeping serves in?
5' 9", and yes, serving is the main reason I like extended frames. I started w/ the Yonex RD Power 10 Long, then the Hyper Pro Staff 6.1 +, then the Pure Control 'Swirly' +. I went away from them for a bit in the mid 2000s as they kinda went out of style, but many manufacturers have been bringing them back of late.
 

pico

Rookie
5' 9", and yes, serving is the main reason I like extended frames. I started w/ the Yonex RD Power 10 Long, then the Hyper Pro Staff 6.1 +, then the Pure Control 'Swirly' +. I went away from them for a bit in the mid 2000s as they kinda went out of style, but many manufacturers have been bringing them back of late.
Hmmm maybe i should restring my ProKennex 7g now **sigh**
 
Hi guys. Maybe some of you are like me in that I have quite a few racquets and not sure how to stick to just one. So many variables involved with strings and stiffness etc that I can't commit!!! How do you guys deal with this?
It's easy. Discard any racquet that you don't like to hit with, or that give you repetitive stress injuries when you use them. Then, take a long, hard, and honest look at your game and how you can now and in the future win points. Pick the racquet that maximizes your capability to win points in that way, and don't look back for at least two years. In two years, you can re-evaluate and see if your game has changed or you have changed, and can look at a different racquet at that time.
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
Hi guys. Maybe some of you are like me in that I have quite a few racquets and not sure how to stick to just one. So many variables involved with strings and stiffness etc that I can't commit!!! How do you guys deal with this?
Maybe avoid the assumption that you should only use one racquet.

We're not putting a minimum of 4-6 hours a day toward honing our games and our fitness - at least I'm not. The pros do that and they often depend on consistency from their equipment so that they can perform the same moves and execute the same shots every time they're on the court. But they're competing for their lunch money. They don't have to like their gear, they need it to perform well for them.

We have more of a license to enjoy ourselves out there. That can include entertaining our curiosities with different racquets and strings. If our time on the courts can be made a little more fun by trying this or that, I say that's fine. If we're having more fun, we're more likely to stay interested and keep after it. Compared with the pros, our "lunch money" as amateurs is often the fun factor itself.

I keep at least two different racquet models in my bag all the time. These are from the same company and they give me a familiar grip shape, so switching off between them doesn't demand much of any adjustment. I can say that I've benefited from having an alternative frame on hand more times than I can count over the last several years. When I'm having a particularly off day, sometimes I'm just going to be stuck there having to deal with it. But on many outings when I couldn't quite click on the courts, I've seemed to jolt my tennis synapses to life by grabbing a different racquet.

Two aspects that make it easier to switch between different racuqets are grip shapes - I mentioned that above - and the balance of the different frames. Even if the static weights of different racuqets vary by several tenths of an ounce, I find that both their maneuvering and swing behavior will be more similar and more familiar for me when they have a comfortable balance. This balance that feels "right" can certainly be different from one player to the next.
 

zipplock

Rookie
Step 1: say, hello, my name is "----" and I am a racquetaholic :giggle:
Step 2: acknowledge there is no single perfect setup
Step 3: prioritize the few characteristics that are most important to you
Step 4: choose the racquet that best matches what you defined in Step 3 and enjoy playing tennis


Step 5: buy the next "perfect" racquet when it comes out, because you are a racquetaholic :p
 

chic

Rookie
As people allude to above, just pick a certain model, get 2+ and match them within "close enough" specs.

Sell or closet the other models and don't take them to the court for a long while.

Once you've committed to how that one racquet will feel you can make adjustments to your game and improve areas that you are weaker at with that setup.

Every months (if you're actively working on improving) or years (if you're mostly just playing and passively improving) reassess if it's doing what you need it to and think about trying out some demos.
 

chic

Rookie
Maybe avoid the assumption that you should only use one racquet
There's some validity to this line of thought as well. But imo if one's playing 3+ times a week then switching racquets frequently will just inhibit the ability to make adjustments and improve technique.

Depends what you're there for though, definitely sounds like a good mentality for weekend warriors!
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Hi guys. Maybe some of you are like me in that I have quite a few racquets and not sure how to stick to just one. So many variables involved with strings and stiffness etc that I can't commit!!! How do you guys deal with this?
My 2 cents is to find the stiffness you like and the string pattern. Once you figure that out look at the lightest racquet that features both. Then you can customize its Swing Weight and balance to your personal preference. Stiffness and string pattern are the 2 things you can't really customize with a racquet. But the rest within reason, given the same stiffness and string pattern you can make any racquet pretty much feel like any other racquet with a bit of work.
 

TennisHound

Legend
Hi guys. Maybe some of you are like me in that I have quite a few racquets and not sure how to stick to just one. So many variables involved with strings and stiffness etc that I can't commit!!! How do you guys deal with this?
I would find out what you do best on each one- which one do you serve the best with, best ground strokes, best volleys, best for quick exchanges, best returns, etc. I’d play someone for fun with each racquet and see how you do. I would Which one do you win with?
 
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tennisbike

Semi-Pro
May god grant you the serenity to accept the things you cannot change, the strength to change the things you can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

Embrace and accept the temptation. Just don't go broke from it. And make sure the Mrs. can accept them too.
 

pico

Rookie
May god grant you the serenity to accept the things you cannot change, the strength to change the things you can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

Embrace and accept the temptation. Just don't go broke from it. And make sure the Mrs. can accept them too.
Praise God!
 

OjoLOCO

New User
Pico, are you playing doubles or singles? What is your level? What is your goal as a recreational tennis player? Please post some video so that this community can offer applicable advice.
 

34n

Rookie
Hi guys. Maybe some of you are like me in that I have quite a few racquets and not sure how to stick to just one. So many variables involved with strings and stiffness etc that I can't commit!!! How do you guys deal with this?
If you do not know what to buy, try any reincarnation of the Pure Drive. You can't go wrong much with it.
 

34n

Rookie
powerful and good but too stiff and not elbow friendly
That was exact opposite to my experience. Ive read tons of comments like this. I would have never considered using it myself. But... I was given 3 frames as a birthday present. Now I use them for about a year and can tell from my experience nothing from the popular beliefs happened. It is an excellent frame in every aspect.
Just find a right string setup.
It is also not too powerful, great control.
 

joah310

New User
That was exact opposite to my experience. Ive read tons of comments like this. I would have never considered using it myself. But... I was given 3 frames as a birthday present. Now I use them for about a year and can tell from my experience nothing from the popular beliefs happened. It is an excellent frame in every aspect.
Just find a right string setup.
It is also not too powerful, great control.
Is this the 2018 model? I tried the 2015 one and that was really bad for my arm.
 
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