Racquet Performance at Max Tension

JoeQ

New User
What effect does stringing at max tension have?

My old racquet was a 55-65lb and I used it at 60lbs (playing for control), but I just switched to a 50-60lb racquet and I'm wondering what the difference would be if I keep stringing it at 60lbs? It feels different, and I'm wondering if that's just shock absorption or if it affects performance at all?

Does one racquet strung at the middle of its range perform better than another racquet with a lower max strung at the same tension? Would a lower tension on my new racquet perform similarly to the 60lb tension on my old racquet? What is the min/max range based on?
 
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JoeQ

New User
I'm less worried about shock absorption because I figure if I keep my fitness/form up and hit the sweet spot I'll do alright.

I'm mostly just wondering if there's a performance difference between 2 racquets with different tension ranges that are strung at the same tension and the same string. I'm going to put Babolat Pro Hurricane 18 on it for now, but I really just want to know if the racquet performs differently more than I want to know whether I'll get tennis elbow or not.

(Half hurricane, half synthetic gut actually. I forget the specific gut string)
 
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Muppet

Legend
You'll be less likely to pick up tennis injuries if you use the right tensions. I have 4 Dunlop 200 series racquets that have a 55 - 65 lb. range. They don't tell you if they mean lockout or electronic constant pull or drop weight constant pull. It also makes a difference which particular machine is used and who does the stringing. I had to try a lot of string beds for each of these frames to find setups I like. I found that for multis I like to be at 56 -58 and for soft polys I like 50 or 51. So you're going to have to hazard a guess to start and better luck next time. But one glaring rule that's important for everyone is to use ~10% lower tension for poly than for nylon based strings. In a hybrid, tension the nylon cross 2 to 5 lbs higher than the poly main. A bigger difference for a softer cross string. This will help match the effective stiffnesses of the two strings.
 

JoeQ

New User
So the recommended tension is something that's entirely about its affect on your arm? It's not about how the racquet hits the ball?

Will I just not be able to get the same kind of Control-Oriented set-up on a racquet if it has a lower tension recommendation? (At least, not without risking injury)? It's not like I can string it at 58 on a 50-60 racquet and have it play like a 63 on a 55-65 would play, right?
 

saleem

Semi-Pro
So the recommended tension is something that's entirely about its affect on your arm? It's not about how the racquet hits the ball?

Will I just not be able to get the same kind of Control-Oriented set-up on a racquet if it has a lower tension recommendation? (At least, not without risking injury)? It's not like I can string it at 58 on a 50-60 racquet and have it play like a 63 on a 55-65 would play, right?
recommended tension on the racket is based on regular nylon (syn gut) strings if you decide to go with poly strings you need to lower the tension by at least 10%
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
What effect does stringing at max tension have?

My old racquet was a 55-65lb and I used it at 60lbs (playing for control), but I just switched to a 50-60lb racquet and I'm wondering what the difference would be if I keep stringing it at 60lbs? It feels different, and I'm wondering if that's just shock absorption or if it affects performance at all?

Does one racquet strung at the middle of its range perform better than another racquet with a lower max strung at the same tension? Would a lower tension on my new racquet perform similarly to the 60lb tension on my old racquet? What is the min/max range based on?
My 2 cents is that its hard to compare racquets like that. Too many variables. Best to start in the middle of the range and go up for more control and down for more power
 

CopolyX

Hall of Fame
also again just way to vague. Old racquet, New racquet...difference in head size, string pattern?
And define..."Better Performance" ..seems like on your second post you referenced control.
But Shroud is spot on.
No matter what, it is still is the recipe of experience, logic and trail & error (gradually drops - 2 to 3 lbs)...

I have so many clients that with their setups, I gradually dropped their starting tension down over time with new string jobs.
3 lbs per drop and have most players with full "copoly" stringbeds in the range of 55 and under ( most around 52)....

Good luck
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
I'm less worried about shock absorption because I figure if I keep my fitness/form up and hit the sweet spot I'll do alright.

I'm mostly just wondering if there's a performance difference between 2 racquets with different tension ranges that are strung at the same tension and the same string. I'm going to put Babolat Pro Hurricane 18 on it for now, but I really just want to know if the racquet performs differently more than I want to know whether I'll get tennis elbow or not.

(Half hurricane, half synthetic gut actually. I forget the specific gut string)
If you look at older racquets that have smaller hoop sizes (mids down around 90" and below), those usually have lower recommended ranges than a lot of the current crop with head sizes up around 100". But these are only guidelines. Installing strings around the bottom of the range will likely feel softer and maybe more lively, while up toward the top of the range will likely feel more "crisp" and seem to have more directional control. The shorter the lengths of string in those smaller heads don't require as much tension to reach a desired amount of firmness.

Lower tension allows the "trampoline" that is essentially the string bed to flex out of position a little more easily - no great revelation there. But according to the guys who have studied the interactions among racquets, strings (including types and tensions), and tennis balls, the actual speed that the ball rebounds off the string bed doesn't change much when tensions or string types are altered. So apparently tension adjustments are mostly about directional control and the feel that a player likes.
 

gmatheis

Hall of Fame
It's called "recommended" tension for a reason. It's not labeled MAX tension or MIN tension.

It is merely a ......... wait for it .......... RECOMMENDATION.

string at whatever tension performs well for you and feels good.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
If you look at older racquets that have smaller hoop sizes (mids down around 90" and below), those usually have lower recommended ranges than a lot of the current crop with head sizes up around 100". But these are only guidelines. Installing strings around the bottom of the range will likely feel softer and maybe more lively, while up toward the top of the range will likely feel more "crisp" and seem to have more directional control. The shorter the lengths of string in those smaller heads don't require as much tension to reach a desired amount of firmness.

Lower tension allows the "trampoline" that is essentially the string bed to flex out of position a little more easily - no great revelation there. But according to the guys who have studied the interactions among racquets, strings (including types and tensions), and tennis balls, the actual speed that the ball rebounds off the string bed doesn't change much when tensions or string types are altered. So apparently tension adjustments are mostly about directional control and the feel that a player likes.
Exactly. Its the launch angle. Low tension high launch which makes the ball travel further at a similar speed. We think ots more power but as you mention its not
 
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