Racquet stringing in less than 10 min

jisop

New User
definetly not sped up, could barely work the camera and computer to get the video up, next time i can put a stop watch in the bottom of the screen.
 

DeShaun

Banned
Seeing how fast you string gives me hope. Very nice work. How much money did you earn in those ten minutes?
 

redfist1000

New User
nice video. wish i could do that. maybe in a couple of years.

Would you be willing to share any tips for a faster stringjob? :)
 

diredesire

Adjunct Moderator
nice video. wish i could do that. maybe in a couple of years.

Would you be willing to share any tips for a faster stringjob? :)
I'm not the OP, but:

It's all in the details.

How long do you take or mounting? A minute? Two minutes? The machine he's using has extremely quick adjusting arms. He was done mounting the frame in 8 seconds.

Watch how often, and how long he spends actively searching for string ends... he spends very little! This translates to holding onto the string ends, and/or making small, systematic habits. For instance, if you aren't good at quickly pulling the string end into your finger tips, drop the end of the string in an empty grommet and let it dangle when you move to the other side (mains)

His tensioner is also fast, so there's another thing you can't do much about. If you're on a crank machine, don't tension too fast, let the string elongate, it'll benefit you in the long run.

Clamp management: One of the easiest ways you can drop time is to learn how to smoothly, and quickly move, and manage your clamps. Notice how direct his movement is.

Weaving: The biggest slow down for most any beginner/intermediate stringers is weaving. If you need some starters, search for "weaving one ahead," and weave at an angle to the main strings. If you weave perpendicular (straight across) the main strings, you have about a centimeter of distance before you have to weave (up/down motion) across each main. If you weave at a hard angle (>45 deg, more like 60-80 deg) to the main strings, you GREATLY increase the "distance" between strings you have to weave. This allows you to greatly de-exaggerate your movements, which is why you'll see people weaving across the stringbed in what looks like an effortless manner.

Knots/symmetry: One of my (particular) habits is that I like to do as many of one action as i can at one time. I've mentioned above that searching for the ends of strings can be a great enemy when trying to drop wasted time [NOTE: I'm not implying that you're trying to race through anything in all the tips i'm giving, these are all DROPPING wasted time]. For me, especially when I string one piece, I'll prelace my mains as far as I can. While for a two piece string job, the net benefit isn't very high, for a one piece string job, I am only looking for the end of the "long side" of the string once. I am in "lacing" mode for about a minute at the start of the string job. I don't drop the string, I don't move to tensioning, nothing. It's just straight lacing. For me, this cuts down a tiny, tiny bit of time, I find switching back and forth between tasks starts to add up. When you're going at a crazy speed, though, pre-lacing can actually get in your way, as you have a loop of untensioned string to deal with at all times. This leads me to knots: Learn how to tie them quickly, and be able to get the slack out. If you watch closely, he is tying a Pro knot (also known as a parnell knot). This allows the stringer to focus on the entire knot, then focus on the tightening (less switching back and forth between tasks, although this only saves about 2 seconds).

You'll also notice in the video that the stringer clips off a bit of extra string when tying the knot, this is optional, and CAN save you some time. I don't like doing this, though. I also like to tie both my mains off at the same time (knot mode, for me). I lace up my knot on one side, then on the other side, then i'll tighten both one after the other, then i'll clip one after the other.

I didn't watch past his first or second main, so I can't comment too much on his weaving technique...

Final tip: Avoid, or at least plan for blocked holes. This will drop several minutes of aggravation if you have a soft string/particularly stubborn holes.

Hope this gives you a bit of a start.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
very impressive! definitely NOT sped up. the OP is just very fast.

great tips from diredesire, too! especially the one about planning for blocked holes. doing this saves ALOT of aggravation especially when string a FAT string like global gut.
 

stringwalla

Rookie
Nice work, definitely could be a little faster, but I won't let any of my tricks out.

That would be an 8 minute job for me and a few other stringers I know (while still within USRSA guidelines, looks like you went beyond 3 mains pulled on one side?)
Not bragging, but there's are some really fast stringers out there in the world where under 10 minutes is easily done. Record documented speed benchmarks for properly strung USRSA frames are roughly as follows-

14M/16X ~6 min
16M/18X ~8 min
18M/20X ~9.5min
18M/20X 93sq/in with full-poly 11:16 on a Prince 5000

Overall speed shows experience, and repetitive motion memory, but does not necessarily indicate a proper string job. That would be determined by a governing body such as the USRSA or a qualified MRT/CRT.

I know most of us get paid per frame, so speed is an asset.
But i think most customers wouldn't want to know that their frame was rushed in any way.
 

star 5 15

Professional
I do my prestiges with alu rough in just under 20 minutes without really trying to rush. Stringing my PSL's was the biggest pain in the ass of anything ive ever strung though, with alu rough it was hell. those took just around 20 minutes.

Edit: I did a 14x18 graphite a couple years back in like 8.5 minutes
 

star 5 15

Professional
To me it seems like the OP is burning the string a lot on the crosses. That screech is like nails on a chalk board for me. Anyone else notice the burning?
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Great tips, DD.

To the OP....WOW. He strung the frame the right way and did it super fast.

It isn't sped up, definitely real time.

I like to think that I 'savor' my stringing.
 

Macedo

Rookie
Someone explain to me what the difference in stringing as he strings it (never mind two pieces, think in one piece), and if we begin to put the string on one side and gives the knot and begins to stretch the strings ?
Like, introducing all the strings on our right side, then to the knot and later tensioning the strings. Stretch the right side mains then the left side mains proceeding then to the crosses normaly
 

thebuffman

Professional
definitely have skills.

question for us perfecting stringers: is it okay to pull those crosses almost straight through like the guy is doing in the video? i basically learned from watching yulitle's tutorials and teaches that the cross strings should be pulled with deliberate undulation.

please educate the ignorant.
 

jim e

Legend
definitely have skills.

question for us perfecting stringers: is it okay to pull those crosses almost straight through like the guy is doing in the video? i basically learned from watching yulitle's tutorials and teaches that the cross strings should be pulled with deliberate undulation.

please educate the ignorant.
I don't know what you were watching , but the video posted here has him fanning the cross strings as well as pulling most of the string through one ahead as well, minimizing string burn.
Only error seen is going more than 3 on a side (in respect to the opposite side mains) , at one time, thats it.
This guy does a nice job fast and efficient. Not that speed is necessary, but there are times were a stringer is under the gun to get jobs done in a hurry. This guy can handle that.
 
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thebuffman

Professional
I don't know what you were watching ,
evidently you didn't watch from beginning to end. the technician did not use deliberate undulation or how can i put it in better words....his fanning pattern on the cross strings did not have large displacement. his fanning displacement was very short. near the end of the video, he was literally pulling the string straight across.

so is it legitimate to duplicate this style? if so i can save myself a lot of time. my fanning pattern goes all the way down the main before i pull the cross string straight.
 

jim e

Legend
Okay, on the last 2 cross strings he pulled the string most of the way through when he was 1/3 way weaving, pulled that on a diagonal of what little room is remaining to do so, and was only across a few main strings at a time, did that again ,pulled a short amount of string, weaved the remainder of that cross,then pulled the remainder. Not much string remaining at that end point, not much string at all,so how much is really getting burned as it was only a few inches of string? As well as that part of the stringbed does not get any wear anyways. The stringer does a pretty good job in that short order of time. As long as the strings are fanned , you do not really need to fan across the entire stringbed while fanning, as long as you move the string across the stringbed while pulling, so it is not burned in a straight line. The stringer does a nice job with this, looks very well experienced, and has good memory to repeat the same way on the stringing.
Notice on this video, he not only weaves one ahead, he also fans the pulling most of the remainder of the cross strings one ahead as well to reduce friction and burning.I have seen many stringers string one ahead, pull tension on the previous cross, then fan that last cross, rather than fan that cross one ahead as well.The important thing to do is move the cross string across the stringbed, and not pull in a straight line to burn, and that is what he does.
As far as the last 2 strings:
If you ever strung with nat. gut, myself, when I get to the last 2 cross strings, I do not fan at all, as I weave one weave and pull the string through each one weave at a time, kind of like sewing, so the string does not untwist.At the end, there is usually not enough string to weave one ahead as well, so weaving each individually is easier on the string, at least with nat. gut so it does not twist in one direction or the other.
 
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jisop

New User
i am also making the strings straight after i tension the cross, and i am tensioning up on the 2 outside mains and the last cross. i thought for the time of the stringing the job was actually pretty descent quality. you just need a trained eye to see what is going on.
 
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