gef_goldblum

New User
Hey all, I'd love to get your recommendations for my string setup. I currently play with a Yonex Ezone 100 strung with Tecnifibre Triax 16 at 52 lbs. I've been playing for a little over a year, and this string works well for me after starting with Syn Gut then transitioning to Wilson Sensation then finally the Triax.

Recently, I demoed both the 2022 Ezone 100 and Ezone 98 with Yonex Rexis Speed 16L at 55 lbs. I really enjoyed this string since the thinner gauge and increased tension added some control I didn't know I was craving. The Rexis Speed is slightly softer than the Triax but nearly identical otherwise.

I ended up ordering the 2022 Ezone 100 and decided to go with the Rexis Speed 16L at 55 lbs in the crosses and Yonex Poly Tour Pro 16L (blue) at 52 lbs in the mains.

After talking to someone at TW, I figured the increased control from the PTP, the thinner gauge overall, and the increased tension on the Rexis would point me in the right direction. I'm not ready to make the larger leap to a full bed of polys, so I thought doing a hybrid setup with a string I'm used to + a softer co-poly would be a good way to go.

Thoughts? Ultimately my goal is to bridge the gap between the 100 and the 98 in terms of control while still maintaining enough power for an upper level beginner.
 

Matthew Lee

Professional
Props to you for doing some research and talking to TW about your situation. A hybrid string bed does sound like a great idea for someone looking to blend power and control for their game.

That being said, I think that the more you play and improve, a full-bed of poly will help you with control and spin. I don't know if you're on the younger or older side, as people do tend to stray away from poly strings as they get older afaik. If you are on the younger side and you continue to improve, a full-bed of poly seems somewhat inevitable imo.
 

gef_goldblum

New User
Props to you for doing some research and talking to TW about your situation. A hybrid string bed does sound like a great idea for someone looking to blend power and control for their game.

That being said, I think that the more you play and improve, a full-bed of poly will help you with control and spin. I don't know if you're on the younger or older side, as people do tend to stray away from poly strings as they get older afaik. If you are on the younger side and you continue to improve, a full-bed of poly seems somewhat inevitable imo.

Appreciate the feedback, Matthew. I'm right there in the middle at 31. I am sure I will get there at some point as I'm pretty invested in the game, playing 5+ times a week.

Aside from PTP, do you have any softer poly/co-polys you'd recommend for the mains in my hybrid setup? What poly would you recommend for my first attempt at a full bed when I get there?

Thanks again!
 

Matthew Lee

Professional
Appreciate the feedback, Matthew. I'm right there in the middle at 31. I am sure I will get there at some point as I'm pretty invested in the game, playing 5+ times a week.

Aside from PTP, do you have any softer poly/co-polys you'd recommend for the mains in my hybrid setup? What poly would you recommend for my first attempt at a full bed when I get there?

Thanks again!
In my personal experience, I've found Isospeed Cream and Wilson Revolve to be some of the more comfortable polyester strings that I have used. However, I haven't really tried many other strings since getting used to Solinco Tour Bite, which is a very harsh and uncomfortable string compared to others.

Here's a list made by Tennis Warehouse: https://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Comfort/catpage-SOFTPOLY1.html
 

Curtennis

Hall of Fame
Stick with syn gut. It is incredibly underrated unless your chronically breaking strings.

Hybrid string jobs will lose tensions at different intervals and can place unneeded stress on a frame if not broken or just replaced frequently enough.
 

gef_goldblum

New User
Stick with syn gut. It is incredibly underrated unless your chronically breaking strings.

Hybrid string jobs will lose tensions at different intervals and can place unneeded stress on a frame if not broken or just replaced frequently enough.

I restring relatively often and have moved on from Syn Gut. Are there any gameplay characteristics that would cause you to recommend Syn Gut over a good Multifilament and/or hybrid setup?
 

gef_goldblum

New User
In my personal experience, I've found Isospeed Cream and Wilson Revolve to be some of the more comfortable polyester strings that I have used. However, I haven't really tried many other strings since getting used to Solinco Tour Bite, which is a very harsh and uncomfortable string compared to others.

Here's a list made by Tennis Warehouse: https://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Comfort/catpage-SOFTPOLY1.html

Good list. I will experiment with some of these after my initial run with PTP. I have been wanting to try the Hyper-G and Tour Bite when I get there.
 

Curtennis

Hall of Fame
I restring relatively often and have moved on from Syn Gut. Are there any gameplay characteristics that would cause you to recommend Syn Gut over a good Multifilament and/or hybrid setup?
The only thing I’d consider better with a multi versus syn gut is potentially better durability depending on the string. And almost always more powerful and Usually more arm friendly than syn gut. Not necessarily a step up for an improving player.

in terms of general control and spin potential, I don’t know any multi that I like more than syn gut. Keep in mind, string makers can’t charge more than 5 a pack on syn gut. They can charge whatever they want for multi. If there’s not a specific element you’re looking for in the string, then it’s probably just overpaying. And the string makers market the hell out of their multis for a reason.
Triax is an absolute money printer for Tecnifibre. It’s a fortune per pack and breaks in 6 hours. For those few hours tho it’s probably one of the better multis for an improving player looking at a string for a more advanced player.

polys are a completely different beast and well worth it for advanced players. They do things no other string can. Hyper G is an incredible performer for any emerging poly player and you can take it up to the Tour level if you wanted.
 

fed1

Professional
Appreciate the feedback, Matthew. I'm right there in the middle at 31. I am sure I will get there at some point as I'm pretty invested in the game, playing 5+ times a week.

Aside from PTP, do you have any softer poly/co-polys you'd recommend for the mains in my hybrid setup? What poly would you recommend for my first attempt at a full bed when I get there?

Thanks again!
You could try Yonex Poly Tour Air, Babolat RPM Soft and the soon to be released Head Lynx Touch.
 

eah123

Professional
There are lots of good options. For a beginner / intermediate player, though, it’s better to just pick a string and stick with it so you can focus on improving your technique.

My favorite soft polys right now are Volkl Cyclone Tour 16 and Hyper G Soft 16L. I think you would do fine with either in a full bed. Just expect to restring after around 20 hours of play when the strings will go completely dead.
 

gef_goldblum

New User
The only thing I’d consider better with a multi versus syn gut is potentially better durability depending on the string. And almost always more powerful and Usually more arm friendly than syn gut. Not necessarily a step up for an improving player.

in terms of general control and spin potential, I don’t know any multi that I like more than syn gut. Keep in mind, string makers can’t charge more than 5 a pack on syn gut. They can charge whatever they want for multi. If there’s not a specific element you’re looking for in the string, then it’s probably just overpaying. And the string makers market the hell out of their multis for a reason.
Triax is an absolute money printer for Tecnifibre. It’s a fortune per pack and breaks in 6 hours. For those few hours tho it’s probably one of the better multis for an improving player looking at a string for a more advanced player.

polys are a completely different beast and well worth it for advanced players. They do things no other string can. Hyper G is an incredible performer for any emerging poly player and you can take it up to the Tour level if you wanted.

You've given me a lot of food for thought. Uneven wear on a hybrid setup with different tensions is not something I considered, and I will definitely keep that in mind. The reason I am playing with multis now is because when I switched from the syn gut I was using to Wilson Sensation and later Triax, the difference was night and day for me.

After reading all these responses, I will probably try the hybrid setup for a cycle then consider testing a full bed of one of the softer co-polys mentioned here, likely the Hyper-G Soft.
 

gef_goldblum

New User
There are lots of good options. For a beginner / intermediate player, though, it’s better to just pick a string and stick with it so you can focus on improving your technique.

My favorite soft polys right now are Volkl Cyclone Tour 16 and Hyper G Soft 16L. I think you would do fine with either in a full bed. Just expect to restring after around 20 hours of play when the strings will go completely dead.

Thank you for the input. At this stage I am still searching for that string to stick with. I've been tweaking one parameter at a time, seeing how I like it, then going from there. Hyper-G Soft seems to be a consensus for one I should try next.
 

gef_goldblum

New User
You could try Yonex Poly Tour Air, Babolat RPM Soft and the soon to be released Head Lynx Touch.

Hey thanks for taking the time to answer. A Soft version of a popular poly string seems like a good choice for me based on what y'all are saying.
 

SCTW

New User
Another vote for Hyper-G Soft 16L. Great string on my Vcore 100. Arm friendly, pocketing and feel once broken in.
 

g4driver

Legend

The thread above applies to all beginners not just 11 year olds.

I find the recommendations from posters who have never strung a frame in their life recommending polys to any beginner telling of how much misinformation on polys exists. I deal with beginners to collegiate players.

Plenty of better choices than polys and poly hybrids for you .. please read the thread I posted.
 

gef_goldblum

New User

The thread above applies to all beginners not just 11 year olds.

I find the recommendations from posters who have never strung a frame in their life recommending polys to any beginner telling of how much misinformation on polys exists. I deal with beginners to collegiate players.

Plenty of better choices than polys and poly hybrids for you .. please read the thread I posted.

Thanks for posting. I read that entire thread. Would you be willing to give me a personalized recommendation?

Some key info based on what I read in there:

• I am not a string breaker
• I restring more often than a typical beginner, at least every 6-8 weeks. I would honestly restring more often if I had two racquets (which I am about to when my new Ezone arrives)
• I very much enjoy Triax 16 @ 52 lbs. – I thought that was going to be my string – but when I tried the Yonex Rexis Speed 16L @ 55 lbs. on a sliiiightly softer 2022 Ezone, I fell in love with the control and still had plenty of power. In fact, I could swing out more and still keep it in the court compared to the lower-strung Triax in my slightly stiffer 2020 Ezone
• My thread says beginner because I started playing in November 2020 as a 30 y/o and like to maintain a beginner mindset, but I am dedicated to learning and play 5+ times a week. Somewhat obsessed with the game, you could say

The reason I am considering switching to a hybrid or trying a full bed of softer co-polys is for the added control. However, after reading that thread, I am thinking I may be able to get away with increasing tension and decreasing gauge on a good multi and continuing on that path.

The options that I would love your opinion on:

1) Stick with Triax 16 and up the tension to ~55 lbs.
2) Switch to Yonex Rexis Speed 16L @ 55 lbs. (it was sooo good in the demo)
3) Try a highly recommended, cheaper multi like Head Velocity MLT. In TW's review they cite "surprisingly high levels of control and spin-potential" with less power than a typical multi. This sounds like exactly what I am looking for
4) Try some of the highly recommended softer co-polys at my usual 52 lbs. or maybe even lower at ~50 lbs. Hyper-G Soft 16L, ISOSPEED Cream 16L, Volkl Cyclone Tour 16, or Yonex Poly Tour Air 16L are the ones I am considering if I go this route, whether it's a full bed or a hybrid setup with my favorite multi

Ultimately, my goal is to dial in my setup, buy a reel of my string of choice, and just continue going to town on improving my technique. Of the above options, what do you think?

And again, thanks so much for your input. Everyone in here has given me a lot of food for thought and generous advice.
 

g4driver

Legend
@gef_goldblum

my .02 try these less expensive setups:

1)Tecnifibre Multi-feel (MF)1.30mm mains / Head Velocity 1.30mm crosses
2) Head Velocity 1.30mm mains / Isospeed Cream 1.28 mm crosses

When you start breaking the multis in setups 1&2 in 15-18 hours that's when I start moving players to other setups like option #3

3) Isospeed Cream 1.28mm mains / Head Velocity 1.30mm crosses

I use 1.38mm Triax ( the thickest gauge) in hybrids for two 4.5C players. It is expensive and I use it to solve specific 4.5C guys who are both string breakers with elbow issues. @Edgewood is a 4.5C guy who uses MF/Velocity and I have several 4.5C guys in their 40s using full beds of multis like X1 Bi-Phase 1.30mm mains / Velocity 1.30mm crosses
 
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gef_goldblum

New User
@g4driver thank you for the recs. Curious, is there any reason you wouldn't recommend trying a full bed of Head Velocity? More broadly, what would you say are the main characteristics and benefits of the setups you provided?

I'll get to ordering some of these and string up my current racquet with setup 1 or 2 once my new Ezone arrives.
 

g4driver

Legend
@g4driver thank you for the recs. Curious, is there any reason you wouldn't recommend trying a full bed of Head Velocity? More broadly, what would you say are the main characteristics and benefits of the setups you provided?

I'll get to ordering some of these and string up my current racquet with setup 1 or 2 once my new Ezone arrives.

Strings are like alcohol. Some work better when mixed with other liquids, whether that liquid is another alcohol or something non-alcoholic. I find several strings work better as hybrids:: velocity, multi-feel, a otter multis, natural gut, ghostwire, cream, YPTA are just a few I find working best in hybrids..

here Is something you may find helpful.

 

g4driver

Legend
@g4driver thank you for the recs. Curious, is there any reason you wouldn't recommend trying a full bed of Head Velocity? More broadly, what would you say are the main characteristics and benefits of the setups you provided?

I pick out strings that last as long as possible without hurting clients while allowing them to improve at a price point that doesn't break the piggy banks. Some players can afford to use edged polys and natural gut crosses and think those setups help them. Other players at higher levels use basic synthetic gut or cheaper soft polys until they break. I don't care what strings clients use, but when I am recommending strings to clients and putting strings in frames and stringing frames for free in my blind playtest with clients, I certainly choose setups that 1) I have hit with personally 2) get great feedback from other clients

Mixing strings is a rabbit hole. There are bartenders and there are very good bartenders. Plenty of advice from posters on this forum from people who recommend a setup they use. I am recommending setups I use for players at your beginner level to 4.5 men that work without hurting players. Do you need a full bed of poly? No, you don't despite all the articles and posts and whatever someone who answered the phone at TW told you. Most TW workers don't string tennis racquets and very few are playtesters. TW playtesters might answer their phones but that is rare and when they do you will recognize their name and voice. Yep, Mark Boone as answered a few times when I have called

my .02:

1) Hire a good coach!

2) realize your coach likely isn't a MRT (Master Racquet Tech) and therefore find one you like and who will work with you to achieve what you're looking for.
3) enjoy tennis and have fun and don't worry too much about the main characteristics and benefits of specific setups.

You've been playing tennis for one year. Your background might be baseball, hockey or something and you will improve quickly if you hire a good coach and do your homework after your lessons. I have plenty of 3.0 and 3.5 players who tell me ( I can't hit any topspin and need poly). I step on the court with them take their frames and then demonstrate in front of their coaches topspin forehands and backhands that easily clear the net by 15 to 20 feet. Then tell them, strings enhance spin, they do not produce spin. Your coach can teach you to hit topspin, but there are no magic strings that create it. TW had a podcast that mentioned creating an item called "topspin" and seeing how much they would sell. It was rather funny, but the point is the same. Strings will only get enhance what you can do. Hiring a solid coach is the part so many players fail to do, and they just jump into the rabbit hole of strings and think strings will solve everything. As a stringer, I wish that were true, but it simply isn't.

So yes, this is my endorsement to find and hire a good coach!
 

stapletonj

Hall of Fame
first, Mr. Goldblume...... fan of the actor, it's not you is it? guess not since you are 30s ha ha

let me, since you are enjoying futzing about with different string setups, offer you some crack cocaine.....

Yonex blue PTP in the crosses..... Klip 16 ga. gut in the mains... see the other threads about tensioning, etc.

just sayin......
 

gef_goldblum

New User
I pick out strings that last as long as possible without hurting clients while allowing them to improve at a price point that doesn't break the piggy banks. Some players can afford to use edged polys and natural gut crosses and think those setups help them. Other players at higher levels use basic synthetic gut or cheaper soft polys until they break. I don't care what strings clients use, but when I am recommending strings to clients and putting strings in frames and stringing frames for free in my blind playtest with clients, I certainly choose setups that 1) I have hit with personally 2) get great feedback from other clients

Mixing strings is a rabbit hole. There are bartenders and there are very good bartenders. Plenty of advice from posters on this forum from people who recommend a setup they use. I am recommending setups I use for players at your beginner level to 4.5 men that work without hurting players. Do you need a full bed of poly? No, you don't despite all the articles and posts and whatever someone who answered the phone at TW told you. Most TW workers don't string tennis racquets and very few are playtesters. TW playtesters might answer their phones but that is rare and when they do you will recognize their name and voice. Yep, Mark Boone as answered a few times when I have called

my .02:

1) Hire a good coach!

2) realize your coach likely isn't a MRT (Master Racquet Tech) and therefore find one you like and who will work with you to achieve what you're looking for.
3) enjoy tennis and have fun and don't worry too much about the main characteristics and benefits of specific setups.

You've been playing tennis for one year. Your background might be baseball, hockey or something and you will improve quickly if you hire a good coach and do your homework after your lessons. I have plenty of 3.0 and 3.5 players who tell me ( I can't hit any topspin and need poly). I step on the court with them take their frames and then demonstrate in front of their coaches topspin forehands and backhands that easily clear the net by 15 to 20 feet. Then tell them, strings enhance spin, they do not produce spin. Your coach can teach you to hit topspin, but there are no magic strings that create it. TW had a podcast that mentioned creating an item called "topspin" and seeing how much they would sell. It was rather funny, but the point is the same. Strings will only get enhance what you can do. Hiring a solid coach is the part so many players fail to do, and they just jump into the rabbit hole of strings and think strings will solve everything. As a stringer, I wish that were true, but it simply isn't.

So yes, this is my endorsement to find and hire a good coach!

I am still looking for a good coach – currently joining clinics in my area as much as possible. Thank you for the reminder that improving technique is number one!

Finding equipment that works for me is also an important part of the equation but not the end all, be all by any means.
 

gef_goldblum

New User
first, Mr. Goldblume...... fan of the actor, it's not you is it? guess not since you are 30s ha ha

let me, since you are enjoying futzing about with different string setups, offer you some crack cocaine.....

Yonex blue PTP in the crosses..... Klip 16 ga. gut in the mains... see the other threads about tensioning, etc.

just sayin......

Haha nope, not me! Just a fun play on my initials.

I'm about to try blue PTP in the mains with my new Ezone. It'll be interesting to see how the hybrid setup fares, and I am really excited to try some of these other recommendations and find what's right for me. Would love to settle on something and just buy a reel of it.
 

Steve Huff

G.O.A.T.
g4driver is completely right. Why do you think you need to "graduate" to a full poly. Many pro's don't use full poly string jobs. There's is most likely no shot you can hit using poly that you can't using synthetic gut unless you're a 5.0 backcourt basher. Before there was poly, pro's like Vilas hit with small-headed rackets with tight string patterns. He hit the ball hard, cleared the net by as much as 7-10 feet, and they still landed in. So, unless you are breaking syn gut or multi more than once every couple of months, you really won't help yourself, and may possibly hurt yourself, by using poly strings.
 

gef_goldblum

New User
g4driver is completely right. Why do you think you need to "graduate" to a full poly. Many pro's don't use full poly string jobs. There's is most likely no shot you can hit using poly that you can't using synthetic gut unless you're a 5.0 backcourt basher. Before there was poly, pro's like Vilas hit with small-headed rackets with tight string patterns. He hit the ball hard, cleared the net by as much as 7-10 feet, and they still landed in. So, unless you are breaking syn gut or multi more than once every couple of months, you really won't help yourself, and may possibly hurt yourself, by using poly strings.

With all due respect, I never said I was trying to "graduate" to poly strings. I have no preconceived notions about what I should be playing with at a given skill level aside from cursory research and recommendations from places like this, YouTube, pro shops, and talking to the product folks at TW.

I came here to get recommendations based on the specific account of my playing experience I offered and the strings I've used so far. I called using a full bed of polys "a larger leap" from my current string setup and skill level because it is exactly that, and it seems that once you no longer need free power from the strings a lot of players do indeed play with poly strings. If anything, I'd love to find the perfect multifilament and buy a reel of it since that's what I am used to.

Do you have a recommendation for me based on my comments above? [1] [2]
 
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Steve Huff

G.O.A.T.
For a multifilament, you might want to try Babolat Addixion. It's solid, has a coating to help it last a little longer than most multi's. Another really good one is Laserfiber 1200. As for a poly, I string more Volkl Cyclone 1.25 than any other poly.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
@gef_goldblum - I've been playing for 50 years and stringing for 40. I tell you this just for reference. I would never recommend a poly to a beginner. IMO, you should start with a synthetic gut. My reasoning is this: synthetic guts are inexpensive, they are notoriously easy on the arm, and they break when they're supposed to. What does the last point mean? Well, if you use a synthetic gut, depending on your strokes, it'll break whereas poly may not. Synthetic gut, when it does go dead, doesn't hurt your arm like poly can. My NTRP level has been as high as 5.0 and I currently play 4.0 seniors (again for reference). I still use a synthetic gut in the mains with a poly cross.

These are my 2 cents since you asked. :) I most definitely would not recommend poly to a beginner or a younger player.
 

gef_goldblum

New User
For a multifilament, you might want to try Babolat Addixion. It's solid, has a coating to help it last a little longer than most multi's. Another really good one is Laserfiber 1200. As for a poly, I string more Volkl Cyclone 1.25 than any other poly.

Thank you for the recommendations, @Steve Huff. I want to make sure I am doing myself justice and not just chasing a preconceived notion. All of you more experienced players are really helping out.
@gef_goldblum - I've been playing for 50 years and stringing for 40. I tell you this just for reference. I would never recommend a poly to a beginner. IMO, you should start with a synthetic gut. My reasoning is this: synthetic guts are inexpensive, they are notoriously easy on the arm, and they break when they're supposed to. What does the last point mean? Well, if you use a synthetic gut, depending on your strokes, it'll break whereas poly may not. Synthetic gut, when it does go dead, doesn't hurt your arm like poly can. My NTRP level has been as high as 5.0 and I currently play 4.0 seniors (again for reference). I still use a synthetic gut in the mains with a poly cross.

These are my 2 cents since you asked. :) I most definitely would not recommend poly to a beginner or a younger player.

Hey @Rabbit, thank you for your insight. This is super helpful. I started with a synthetic gut and eventually started playing with multifilament after trying one and really liking it. I haven't looked back since, but maybe it's time to give syn gut a shot again. With my technique having improved, it may be a different/better experience.

After reading everything here from the more experienced players, I am going to try the hybrid setup my new racquet is arriving with then go from there.
 

pdparos78

New User
Hey all, I'd love to get your recommendations for my string setup. I currently play with a Yonex Ezone 100 strung with Tecnifibre Triax 16 at 52 lbs. I've been playing for a little over a year, and this string works well for me after starting with Syn Gut then transitioning to Wilson Sensation then finally the Triax.

Recently, I demoed both the 2022 Ezone 100 and Ezone 98 with Yonex Rexis Speed 16L at 55 lbs. I really enjoyed this string since the thinner gauge and increased tension added some control I didn't know I was craving. The Rexis Speed is slightly softer than the Triax but nearly identical otherwise.

I ended up ordering the 2022 Ezone 100 and decided to go with the Rexis Speed 16L at 55 lbs in the crosses and Yonex Poly Tour Pro 16L (blue) at 52 lbs in the mains.

After talking to someone at TW, I figured the increased control from the PTP, the thinner gauge overall, and the increased tension on the Rexis would point me in the right direction. I'm not ready to make the larger leap to a full bed of polys, so I thought doing a hybrid setup with a string I'm used to + a softer co-poly would be a good way to go.

Thoughts? Ultimately my goal is to bridge the gap between the 100 and the 98 in terms of control while still maintaining enough power for an upper level beginner.
Not sure of your age, but i'm 45 years old and have been playing with hybrid setups for the last 15 years. Today I tried a full bed of HyperG Soft poly at 21kg in my modded Prince 97p (343g) and I'm sold on poly 100%. I couldn't hit a shot wrong this morning. I had more directional control, depth control and just hitting running forehands from the far corners of the court. Must have been the added grip on the ball from the shaped poly. This is just my experience. Again I don't know your age, arm condition or how long you've been playing but either way i'd say don't be afraid of going fully poly, especially if it's a softer poly. It's also more economical. Only thing is you'd probably have to restring more often, so get a second copy of your racket that you're using to alternate.
 

cks

Hall of Fame
I step on the court with them take their frames and then demonstrate in front of their coaches topspin forehands and backhands that easily clear the net by 15 to 20 feet. Then tell them, strings enhance spin, they do not produce spin. Your coach can teach you to hit topspin, but there are no magic strings that create it.
This is a keeper.
 

cks

Hall of Fame
Today I tried a full bed of HyperG Soft poly at 21kg in my modded Prince 97p (343g) and I'm sold on poly 100%.
Yep. I've been playing with full bed poly for a while. I first started out with Tour Status, but now I'm playing with Tour Sniper. I've been stringing my own rackets for the last year and replace my strings about every 2-3 weeks.
 

Frankc

Professional
Find a good multi in reels - great performance, great on joints, and far less $$$$.
(Problem is that many do not come in reels.. )
 
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