Record for consecutive points won

krosero

Legend
Who knows what the alltime record might be but here are some I've collected.

Please post any others you know of.

- 34 by Riggs against Salichs to open their R64 match at 1941 New Jersey state championship in Orange, NJ (score was 6-0, 6-0, streak ended in ninth game)
- 27 by Emerson against Rosewall in the 1968 Hollywood, FL, final
- 25 (at least) by Scanlon including his “golden set” over Marcos Hocevar, 1983 WCT Gold Coast Classic, Delray Beach, FL, 1st round (6-2, 6-0)
- 25 by Rusedski against Nicolas Massu in R128 at 2001 Miami
- 23 by Murray to end his R64 match against Vincent Millot at 2014 AO
- 23 by Wilander against McEnroe in a 1983 French Open QF
- 22 by Connors against Solomon in a quarterfinal at Maui in October 1977
- 21 by Nadal against Kristof Vliegen in R16 at 2007 Monte Carlo
- 20 at least by Federer against Verdasco in R16 at 2015 Dubai
- 20 at least by Edberg to close out second set against McEnroe in R16 at 1991 Wimbledon
- 20 by Hewitt against Roddick to close out a 2004 Masters Cup semifinal
- 19 by Hoad against Jean Grinda in R16 at 1953 Queensland Championships (6-3, 6-0, 6-2)
- 19 by Agassi against Sampras in their 1995 Miami final
- 18 by Eric Sturgess against Art Larsen at end of their R16 match at 1949 Pacific Southwest Championships in Los Angeles
- 18 by Borg to end second set (won from 1-5 down) against Solomon at 1975 RG
- 18 by Martin against Rusedski in R16 at 1999 USO
- 18 by Dimitrov against Baghdatis in 2013 Rotterdam quarterfinal (from 6-5 in second)
- 18 by Nadal against Lajovic in R16 at 2014 RG (including last point of opening set)
- 17 by Cochet against Tilden during third set of a semifinal at 1927 Wimbledon
- 16 at least by Bjorkman against Edberg in R64 at 1994 USO
- 16 by Edberg against Wilander in final of 1986 Stockholm Open
- 13-19 by Kramer against Budge in a semifinal at 1948 US Pro
- 16 by Kovacs to start off the third set against Riggs in Trenton, NJ, Dec. 27, 1941
- 16 by Djokovic against Conor Niland (ended with Niland’s retirement) in R128 at 2011 USO
- 15 at least by Sampras to close second set against Ivanisevic in their 1994 Grand Slam Cup semifinal
- 15 by Pancho Gonzalez against Rosewall in a semifinal of an 8-man event at MSG in 1968
- 15 by Connors against Alexander to close out a match in the 1977 Aetna World Cup
- 15 by Lendl against Wilander in a 1986 Masters semifinal
- 15 by Jarryd in a loss to McEnroe at Stockholm in 1984
- 13-18 by Bromwich in a win over Parker in 1939 Davis Cup Challenge Round (6-0, 6-3, 6-1)
- 14 by Stolle against Newcombe in 1966 US Championships final
- 14 by Connors against Pernfors in R16 at 1987 Wimbledon
- 14 by Agassi against Bruguera in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics final
- 14 by Federer against Hewitt in the 2004 USO final
- 14 by Federer against Nadal in a 2007 Masters Cup semifinal (part of a run of 20 of 21)
- 14 by Djokovic against Youzhny in R32 at 2013 Monte Carlo
- 14 by Federer in first set against Benneteau in R32 at 2013 RG
- 13 at least by Budge in third set against Riggs in 1942 pro tour stop at Hershey, PA
- 13 by Laver against Pancho Gonzalez in a 1968 French Open semifinal
- 13 by Laver against Gorman in the 1973 Davis Cup final
- 13 by Connors in the third set of a loss to Orantes in the 1975 USO final
- 13 by McEnroe against Borg in the second set of the 1980 USO final
- 13 by Lendl against Wilander starting in the second set of the 1987 USO final
- 13 by Woodforde to start off a win over Rostagno at the 1992 AT&T Challenge in Atlanta (6-1, 6-3)
- 13 by Federer against Roddick in the second set of a 2007 AO semifinal
- 13 and 12 (two streaks) by McEnroe against Lewis in the 1983 Wimbledon final
- 12 by Riggs, all to start off the second set against Kovacs in 1941 US final
- 12 at least by Hoad against Gonzalez in the 1959 Tournament of Champions final
- 12 by Rosewall against Newcombe in the fourth set of a loss in the 1970 Wimbledon final
- 12 by Graebner against Nastase in fourth and fifth sets of their 1971 National Indoor semifinal
- 12 by Dibbs against Connors in the second set of their 1975 Dewar final in London on carpet
- 12 by Borg against Bernie Mitton in R32 at 1978 USO (4-6, 6-4, 6-2)
- 12 by Connors against Lendl in 1982 USO final
- 12 by Lendl against Connors in a January 1983 Masters semifinal
- 12 by Mecir against McEnroe in the first set of the 1987 Dallas WCT final
- 12 by Becker against Edberg in 1989 Davis Cup final
- 12 by Sampras against Agassi during third set of their 1990 USO final
- 12 by Agassi against Sampras during third set of their 1992 RG quarterfinal
- 12 by Djokovic against Ferrer in a 2007 USO semifinal
- 12 by Federer against Roddick during second set of a 2009 AO semifinal
- 12 by Nadal against Roddick during second set of their 2011 USO quarterfinal
- 12 by Wawrinka against Djokovic during second set of a loss in 2013 USO quarterfinal
- 12 by Wawrinka against Nadal (including last 5 of opening set) in the 2014 AO final
- 11 by Pancho Gonzalez to close his win over Pasarell in R128 at 1969 Wimbledon
- 11 by Nastase against Orantes in the 1971 Italian Open final
- 11 by Connors against Borg to close first set of 1976 USO final
- 11 by Gomez in the first set of a loss to Lendl in a January 1986 Masters semifinal
- 11 by Gilbert in the first set of a loss to Cash in a 1986 Davis Cup semifinal
- 11 by Wilander against Noah in a 1988 Miami semifinal
- 11 by Sampras against Kafelnikov during second set of their rubber in 1995 Davis Cup final
- 11 by F. Gonzalez against Haas to open their 2007 AO semifinal
- 11 and 11 (two streaks) by Nadal against Djokovic in second and third sets, respectively, of a 2008 RG semifinal
- 11 by Djokovic against Nadal in second set a loss in 2010 USO final
- 11 by Djokovic against Federer in third set of a 2011 Indian Wells semifinal
- 11 and 10 (two streaks) by Lendl against Connors in a 1987 USO semifinal
- 10 by Vines against Perry during fourth set of their 1931 Newport final (6-2, 6-4, 6-8, 6-2)
- 10 by Pancho Gonzalez against Droby during third set of a 1948 US Championships semifinal
- 10 by Pancho Gonzalez against Hoad during second set in Toledo on March 27, 1958 (6-3, 6-2)
- 10 by Borg to close against Panatta in a 1977 Pepsi Grand Slam semifinal
- 10 by Cash against Connors in the third set of a 1987 Wimbledon semifinal
- 10 by Sampras in a loss to Agassi (nine to close third set) in a 2000 AO semi
- 10 by Federer against Djokovic in second set of their 2007 USO final
- 10 by Gasquet against Federer in first set in R16 at 2011 Rome
- 10 by Nadal in a loss to Dolgopolov in R32 at 2014 Indian Wells



- 48 by Hotchkiss in a “golden match” against Huiskamp in a 1910 Washington State semifinal (6-0, 6-0)
- 24 (at least) by Shvedova against Errani in R32 at 2012 Wimbledon in a “golden set” (6-0, 6-4)
- 23 by Shvedova to start a match (a loss) against Amy Frazier at Memphis in 2006
- 23 by Garrison against Katerina Maleeva (including first 21 of second set) in a 1986 Chicago quarterfinal
- 21 by Evert against Jaeger in the second set of their 1982 Amelia Island final (6-3, 6-1)
- 21 by S. Williams against Bencic in R64 at 2014 Madrid
- 20 at least (the first five games) by Helen Wills against Helen Jacobs to start off their 1927 Essex County Club Invitation final
- 20 by Graf against Garrison to open their 1989 Washington final
- 19 by Stosur to open against Petra Martic in the R128 at 2012 USO (ended by a double-fault)
- 18 by Temesvari against Garrison (including 7 in the tiebreak) in the 1985 Indianapolis final (7-6(0), 6-3)
- 17 by Stosur against S. Williams in a 2010 RG quarterfinal
- 17 by Jaeger in the second set against Ruzici in a 1981 Kansas City semifinal (6-2, 6-3)
- 15 by Graf in a loss to Capriati at Mahwah in 1999 (exhibition)
- 15 by Henin in a loss to S. Williams in the 2010 AO final
- 15 by Jankovic in the first set of a loss to Ivanovic in R32 at 2013 AO
- 14 by Navratilova in a loss to Evert in the 1975 French Open final
- 14 by Mandlikova against Evert in a 1986 Wimbledon semifinal
- 14 and 13 (two streaks, one to open the match) by Sabatini against Gigi Fernandez in a 1994 USO quarterfinal
- 14 by Henin against Pierce in the 2005 French Open final
- 14 by S. Williams in a loss to Lisicki in R16 at 2013 Wimbledon
- 13 by King against Jones in a 1968 Wimbledon semifinal
- 13 by Evert in second set of a loss to Kathy Jordan at 1985 Virginia Slims Championships
- 13 by Graf in the second set against Fang Li in a 1998 Mahwah semifinal (exhibition)
- 13 by Razzano against S. Williams in R128 at 2012 French Open
- 12 by Navratilova against Evert in the first set of the 1985 AO final
- 12 by Graf against Zvereva in the 1988 RG final
- 12 by Graf twice (two streaks) in a win over Sanchez Vicario in the 1990 Amelia Island final (6-1, 6-0)
- 12 by Pierce in second set against Sanchez Vicario in 2000 Hilton Head final (winning 14 of last 15 points)
- 12 by Stosur to close first set against S. Williams in 2010 USO final
- 12 by Bouchard against Suarez-Navarro in a 2014 RG quarterfinal
- 11 by Jacobs in a loss to Wills Moody in the first set of the 1935 Wimbledon final
- 11 by V. Williams against S. Williams in the second set of their 2000 Wimbledon semifinal
- 11 by Halep against Azarenka in the second set of a 2014 Madrid semifinal
- 10 by Lenglen against Wills at Cannes in 1926
- 10 by Evert in the second set of a loss to King in the 1973 Wimbledon final
- 10 by Mandlikova against Evert in a March 1986 Virginia Slims Championship semifinal
- 10 by Navratilova against Mandlikova in a March 1986 Virginia Slims Championship final
 
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hoodjem

G.O.A.T.
Re: Emerson’s streak, this is from an article provided by ABMK at http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1368&dat=19680415&id=4XVQAAAAIBAJ&sjid=uRAEAAAAIBAJ&pg=7320,3520310
Roy Emerson, playing in his first professional tennis tournament, overpowered the world’s second ranked Ken Rosewall to win the $10,000 pro tennis challenge cup tournament Sunday.

Emerson took 27 straight points in the play and defeated Rosewall, 6-1, 6-1.​
Dang! More than the total of a golden Bagel.
 

Vensai

Professional
Re: Emerson’s streak, this is from an article provided by ABMK at http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1368&dat=19680415&id=4XVQAAAAIBAJ&sjid=uRAEAAAAIBAJ&pg=7320,3520310

Roy Emerson, playing in his first professional tennis tournament, overpowered the world’s second ranked Ken Rosewall to win the $10,000 pro tennis challenge cup tournament Sunday.

Emerson took 27 straight points in the play and defeated Rosewall, 6-1, 6-1.​
Impressive. Never knew that Emerson did that to Rosewall.
 

BobbyOne

G.O.A.T.
Impressive. Never knew that Emerson did that to Rosewall.
Vensai, Laver did even more to Rosewall in their 1968 Wembley final (at least in games) when winning 6-0,6-1,6-0. And Laver won 12 games in a row against Rosewall in the final of the 1968 PSW by winning 4-6, 6-0, 6-0.

Rosewall won 15 games in a row in the 1960 Wembley SF against 1959 Wimbledon winner, Olmedo, winning 6-0, 6-0, 6-3.
 

JW10S

Hall of Fame
great thread...to bad there is no record of how many points Scanlon won to close out the 1st set, kind of a shame all we have is 'at least' 25 points in a row.
 
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abmk

Bionic Poster
nice thread. Some of those streaks are really impressive, especially the ones against great servers like sampras, mcenroe, roddick, newk etc .....
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
great thread...to bad there is no record of how many points Scanlon won to close out the 1st set, kind of a shame all we have is 'at least' 25 points in a row.
He lost only two points from 3-2 in the first set. That means at least 36 of the last 38 points went to Scanlon.

Scanlon also double bageled Victor Pecci at Wimby.

Here's another oddity...Shvedova was one point away from a golden set in '06 vs Amy Frazier when she double faulted, then lost the game but broke back for a 6-1 first set. That was the last game she won in the match, getting double bageled. The date...February 22, 2006; exactly 23 years after Scanlon's golden day!

We also had a golden set @USO'13 qualifying...Julian Reister of Germany beat his countryman Tim Puetz, winning 6-7, 6-4, 6-0. Reister had at least 25 points, too
 

krosero

Legend
Bit of a surprise to see names like Emerson, Murray, Wilander, Nadal, etc., prominently in the list. They are not thought of as streaky players.

But you have to hold your concentration very well to produce any streak. That's particularly true for a streak like this one; it's not a service streak but a general one, so you have to concentrate without interruption, in your service games and your opponent's.

In that sense it's not a surprise to see the names of players known for consistency (or even attackers like Kramer and Edberg who were all about playing the percentages).
 

jaggy

Talk Tennis Guru
He lost only two points from 3-2 in the first set. That means at least 36 of the last 38 points went to Scanlon.

Scanlon also double bageled Victor Pecci at Wimby.

Here's another oddity...Shvedova was one point away from a golden set in '06 vs Amy Frazier when she double faulted, then lost the game but broke back for a 6-1 first set. That was the last game she won in the match, getting double bageled. The date...February 22, 2006; exactly 23 years after Scanlon's golden day!

We also had a golden set @USO'13 qualifying...Julian Reister of Germany beat his countryman Tim Puetz, winning 6-7, 6-4, 6-0. Reister had at least 25 points, too
Pretty incredible.
 

kiki

Banned
for all the talking here, it shows how much cluelessness we find when judging top players of the 60´s.

Emerson never ever achieveded what Fraser did, and that is to make Laver look like his midget.

Laver wouldn´t turn pro because of Emerson but he certainly had a good reason as far as Fraser kept being an amateur...
 

abmk

Bionic Poster
for all the talking here, it shows how much cluelessness we find when judging top players of the 60´s.

Emerson never ever achieveded what Fraser did, and that is to make Laver look like his midget.

Laver wouldn´t turn pro because of Emerson but he certainly had a good reason as far as Fraser kept being an amateur...
Emerson beat Laver twice in majors in 61 and Laver in 61 was wayyyyyy better than he was in 60.

Laver turned pro because he'd accomplished whatever he wanted to do in the amateur tour - winning the GS and wanted to take on the challenge of the pro tour -- not because of Fraser or Emerson or any other player ... duh !

In any case, Fraser isn't even close to Emerson overall, though he could be dangerous with his serving. 'only' 3 amateur majors compared to 12 for Emerson ...
 

kiki

Banned
Laver vs Fraser battles are really titanic clashes

Fraser won in straight sets their 1960 FH final and in 4 sets their Wimbledon F the very same season.

In the 1962 season, Laver beat Fraser in 5 extremely close sets at their RG SF and in the 1961 season, Laver also won in 5 dramatic sets their FH final.

Laver never experienced tougher competition at any of his slam wins.Emerson comes second.
 

hoodjem

G.O.A.T.
Laver vs Fraser battles are really titanic clashes

Fraser won in straight sets their 1960 FH final and in 4 sets their Wimbledon F the very same season.

In the 1962 season, Laver beat Fraser in 5 extremely close sets at their RG SF and in the 1961 season, Laver also won in 5 dramatic sets their FH final.

Laver never experienced tougher competition at any of his slam wins.Emerson comes second.
Did Fraser turn pro after 1962?

(He seems to drop off the tennis map after that year.?)
 
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BobbyOne

G.O.A.T.
Laver vs Fraser battles are really titanic clashes

Fraser won in straight sets their 1960 FH final and in 4 sets their Wimbledon F the very same season.

In the 1962 season, Laver beat Fraser in 5 extremely close sets at their RG SF and in the 1961 season, Laver also won in 5 dramatic sets their FH final.

Laver never experienced tougher competition at any of his slam wins.Emerson comes second.
kiki, Laver LOST in the 1961 FH final to Emerson in 3 sets.
 

Rosewall

Rookie
>20 by Hewitt against Roddick to close out a 2004 Masters Cup semifinal

I was sitting in a hotel room in Doha, Qatar watching that on TV as it happened. Roddick was close to going up a break on Hewitt early in the second set. Roddick choked and five minutes later the match was over. He should have been fined for quitting.
 

krosero

Legend
From a NY Times report on the Wilander-McEnroe match at '83 French, which Wilander won 1-6, 6-2, 6-4, 6-0

‘‘I choked,’’ McEnroe said after his 1-6, 6-2, 6-4, 6-0 setback, in which he had dropped 11 straight games at the end. The sudden collapse began when he was leading, 4-2, 40-15, in the third set. From there, the second-seeded American lost 23 consecutive points, 4 straight games at love and 40 of the match’s last 47 points.

‘‘I should have been leading at least two sets to one,’’ he said. ‘‘There’s no excuse for it. I was terrible in the last set and a half. I think I need more work on clay, but there’s no reason I can’t beat these guys.’’

....McEnroe looked invincible in the first set, which was by far his best in this difficult tournament and one of the best in his career on clay. Not known for making drop shots, he took Wilander by surprise and scored on them repeatedly. And his first serve was working well enough to allow him to play a crisp serve-and-volley game.

Wilander opened with a break in the second set and stayed in command, but at the start of the third, McEnroe seemed back on his game. He broke to 2-0, held at love for 3-0 and later rebounded from 0-30 to hold for 4-1. At 4-2, 40-15, his trouble started. He made a backhand error, then Wilander scored on a backhand down the line, McEnroe netted a routine volley and Wilander closed out the game with a forehand pass down the line.

Wilander looked tough in the eighth game, holding at love. On the first point of the next game, McEnroe’s volley close to the line was called out. He demanded that the chair umpire, Michel Perrot, come onto the court to ‘‘show me the mark.’’ Perrot refused, and McEnroe took his case to the Grand Prix supervisor seated at courtside. Again, his pleas were rebuffed, and the point was awarded to Wilander, who won the game at love, then took one point after another until the set was completed.

Wilander also won the first game of the fourth set at love, after McEnroe had delayed the start of play by taking his seat, crossing his legs and waiting for a plane [a 747 carrying the space shuttle Enterprise] to complete its passage over the center court.

McEnroe referred briefly after the match to his loss of concentration, once ‘‘disturbances started to occur,’’ but did not blame linesmen, noisy spectators or planes for his loss.​
McEnroe didn't even mention this match in his book.
 

kiki

Banned
only three men owned Laver for brief slots of time: Hoad and Rosewall in 63 ( and Rosewall in the early 70´s as well) and Fraser in the 1960 season

Hoad and Rosewall receive tons of worshipp...why not Fraser?
 

BobbyOne

G.O.A.T.
only three men owned Laver for brief slots of time: Hoad and Rosewall in 63 ( and Rosewall in the early 70´s as well) and Fraser in the 1960 season

Hoad and Rosewall receive tons of worshipp...why not Fraser?
kiki, After all those years you should know the answer...

Hoad and Rosewall were giants of tennis. Fraser was a journeyman, pardon, a very good player...;-)
 

kiki

Banned
kiki, After all those years you should know the answer...

Hoad and Rosewall were giants of tennis. Fraser was a journeyman, pardon, a very good player...;-)
Inverse proportion rate between Fraser and Roche.You also know that.

Roche was Laver´s midget and Laver was Fraser´s midget for a while
 
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BobbyOne

G.O.A.T.
Inverse proportion rate between Fraser and Roche.You also know that.

Roche was Laver´s midget and Laver was Fraser´s midget for a while
kiki, When reaching my age of life you will hopefully agree with me ;-)

In all seriosity: It's a shame you compare Rosewall and Hoad with second class Fraser!!!

And you will never understand that the 1968/69 Laver was miles ahead of the 1960 Laver!!! Thought you are a Laver fan who knows Rod's career...
 

kiki

Banned
kiki, When reaching my age of life you will hopefully agree with me ;-)

In all seriosity: It's a shame you compare Rosewall and Hoad with second class Fraser!!!

And you will never understand that the 1968/69 Laver was miles ahead of the 1960 Laver!!! Thought you are a Laver fan who knows Rod's career...
I know that.But no reason to belittle Fraser´s achivements.Believe me, I like Roche...but not at the cost of that stupid belitteling of others...

Roche real shortcoming is not his injuries..it is he always felt of himself as a second rate player ( when he certainly was not) when a big name was playing against him for a major title.He was unable to beat top players like Stolle ( OK he was young), Emmo,Rosewall,Laver.He beat Newcombe but they were long time doubles mates, so...

He has one of the worst won/lost finals ratio ever...maybe that is why he emphatized so well with Lendl???.He thought of himself when he thought of Lendl, no doubt about that.
 

BobbyOne

G.O.A.T.
I know that.But no reason to belittle Fraser´s achivements.Believe me, I like Roche...but not at the cost of that stupid belitteling of others...

Roche real shortcoming is not his injuries..it is he always felt of himself as a second rate player ( when he certainly was not) when a big name was playing against him for a major title.He was unable to beat top players like Stolle ( OK he was young), Emmo,Rosewall,Laver.He beat Newcombe but they were long time doubles mates, so...

He has one of the worst won/lost finals ratio ever...maybe that is why he emphatized so well with Lendl???.He thought of himself when he thought of Lendl, no doubt about that.
kiki, I agree: Stop that stupid belittling of Roche!!! It's disgusting to belittle a player who was (much) stronger than your darlings, Fraser, Emerson and Newcombe; a player who was No.2 in the world, who had a positive hth against Laver in 1969, who has a positive hth against great Rosewall, who was able to give Ashe a better resistance than Connors was able to do at Wimbledon in 1975, who beat McEnroe in straight sets in 1978... Do you really think a Fraser could have beaten McEnroe???

And yes, Roche lost three of his best years due to injuries. Imagine Fraser would lose 1960 to 1962, Emerson 1964 to 1966, Newcombe 1970 to 1972...

Awake, my friend!
 

kiki

Banned
kiki, I agree: Stop that stupid belittling of Roche!!! It's disgusting to belittle a player who was (much) stronger than your darlings, Fraser, Emerson and Newcombe; a player who was No.2 in the world, who had a positive hth against Laver in 1969, who has a positive hth against great Rosewall, who was able to give Ashe a better resistance than Connors was able to do at Wimbledon in 1975, who beat McEnroe in straight sets in 1978... Do you really think a Fraser could have beaten McEnroe???

And yes, Roche lost three of his best years due to injuries. Imagine Fraser would lose 1960 to 1962, Emerson 1964 to 1966, Newcombe 1970 to 1972...

Awake, my friend!
Don´t come up with bad losers excuses, please.I am old enough for childish games.

Roche had certainly a big injury: a big hole at his brains...or at the place he was supossed to have a couple of circular things.

While Fraser,Newcombe certainly never lacked them...that is why their record is so superior to poor Tony.

Even Lendl started winning biggies after a semi failing start.But Roche?
 

BobbyOne

G.O.A.T.
Don´t come up with bad losers excuses, please.I am old enough for childish games.

Roche had certainly a big injury: a big hole at his brains...or at the place he was supossed to have a couple of circular things.

While Fraser,Newcombe certainly never lacked them...that is why their record is so superior to poor Tony.

Even Lendl started winning biggies after a semi failing start.But Roche?
kiki, It's not that you are not old enough: You are too old to judge the great Roche.

I don't know who has a hole in his brain...

Your "logic" is circular.

For the last time, my friend: Fraser did never play a match against top Laver or top Rosewall!!! Roche played several such matches and almost beat Laver at the AO.

Roche did not win open era majors because he lost his three best years due to injuries!!!

Awake!!
 
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krosero

Legend
A report from The Independent on Sampras' streak vs Goran at '94 Grand Slam Cup. Some useful stats, esp. since the ATP has no stats for the GS Cup:

IT WAS this year's Wimbledon final transported indoors in Germany, and without the anti- climax - unless you happen to be Goran Ivanisevic.

The Croat was again beaten by Pete Sampras, but on this occasion, in the semi-finals of the Compaq Grand Slam Cup, he stretched the world No1 to five sets over three hours and 22 minutes and saved four match-points.

Sampras won, 5-7 6-3 6-4 6-7 10-8, and though that was the vital statistic, the match provided others that were astonishing. There were 70 aces - 41 of them delivered by Ivanisevic, who extended his world record for a year's tally to 1,241. In 1970, Britain's John Feaver hit 42 aces when losing to John Newcombe on Court No2 at Wimbledon, but that will be of no consolation to the Croat.

Between them, Sampras and Ivanisevic generated 71 other service winners, 36 of which were from Sampras, who was also guilty of 11 double-faults, four more than his opponent. With so many free points flowing, it was a wonder that the players could hold their concentration on the rare occasions when a rally was allowed to develop. But they did.

Poor Ivanisevic must be wondering how he is able to lose after serving so well. At Wimbledon in 1992, he hit a record 206 aces in seven matches, 37 of them in the final against Andre Agassi - and was the runner-up.

Sampras's delight was heightened by the fact that in the semi-finals here a year ago he lost to the Czech Petr Korda, another left-hander, on a fifth match point, 13-11 in the fifth set.

In today's final, Sampras will play Sweden's Magnus Larsson, who continued an impressive end to the season by defeating the American Todd Martin, 6-4 6-1 6-1 in 75 minutes.

Sampras, after an uncertain start yesterday in which he double-faulted twice to lose his serve in the opening game, broke back to 3-3 in the opening set. When leading 5-4, he narrowly missed with a forehand down the line with his second set-point on Ivanisevic's serve.

Ivanisevic immediately broke for 6-5 and then held to become the first player to take a set from Sampras. The Californian quickly recovered and won 15 consecutive points from 2-2 in the second set, levelling the match on his seventh set point.

Frustration began to creep into Ivanisevic's play, and he received a code violation for smashing his racket after netting a forehand volley to be broken for 3-2 in the third set. Sampras took a 2-1 lead, but not before saving three break-points in the concluding game of the set.

The fourth set, and the match, seemed about to go Sampras's way after Ivanisevic double-faulted and then missed a backhand to offer the American a break-point at 5-5. Ivanisevic missed his first serve, then delivered his 25th ace with his second – shades of that memorable Wimbledon contest against Britain's Chris Bailey last year.

After saving two match points at 4-5 in the fifth set and two more at 7-8, Ivanisevic finally steered a backhand volley over the baseline.​
 

BTURNER

Legend
Krosero, you mis-identified the year in the Mandlikova- Evert example. Hana played Evert in 1986. Martina played Evert in the semis of 1987. Te number however is accurate. It had all the feel of a three setter, combined into a two setter. Evert did nothing especially wrong during the streak, which came after Evert had a big lead in the second. Hana just could not take a breath without it resulting in a clean winner. Just one of those golden periods, that left all of Hana's opponents praying for some mercy. It was a very well played match by both throughout that you can see on youtube in its entirety.
 
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diggler

Professional
I was playing doubles the other day and we won the first 11 points in a row. I then proceeded to miss an easy volley on the 12th point. Damn!
 

kiki

Banned
Lendl vs Solomon 80 US Open
6-1,6-0,6-0
the biggest landslide ever at a GS tournament a top ten player endured...opinions?
 

krosero

Legend
Just for you, Bturner, and thanks for the correction :)

Palm Beach Post:

Quickly, Evert jumped ahead in the second set, breaking Mandlikova in the second set with a forehand pass. Evert stayed ahead, leading, 5-2, and, as late afternoon arrived, the crowd settled in for a decisive third set.

It never happened. In a few stunning moments that had to be among the most wrenching in Evert’s career, Mandlikova scored 14 consecutive points. She went from 2-5 down to 5-5 and ahead, 0-30, on Evert’s serve. No one, including Evert, knew quite how to react.

“I wasn’t really thinking about any streak or points in a row,” Evert said. “I was just trying to work and concentrate on each point.”

It wasn’t doing any good. Mandlikova held for 5-3 with two aces and two service winners. She broke to reach 5-4 with four winners, the last a forehand that must have looked like a BB as it approached Evert. She held for 5-all, even though Evert managed two strong returns. Each time, Mandlikova breezed across the grass and hit yet another winner.

The streak finally ended when Mandlikova pushed a forehand deep to let Evert reach 15-30. But at 30-40, Mandlikova attacked a second serve, came in and knocked off a forehand volley to lead 6-5. She shook a fist in the air and the only sound at Wimbledon was the buzz of shock throughout the old stadium.​
 
15 by Jarryd against McEnroe at Stockholm in 1984
Yet Mac still won the(infamous) match. Think its the only match listed where someone on the losing end of a streak went on to win the match. I'm guessing Jarryd won more total points that day.

The sudden collapse began when he was leading, 4-2, 40-15, in the third set. From there, the second-seeded American lost 23 consecutive points, 4 straight games at love and 40 of the match’s last 47 points.
so the streak ended in the 2nd game of the 4th set. I wonder how many points Mac won in that set.

On the first point of the next game, McEnroe’s volley close to the line was called out. He demanded that the chair umpire, Michel Perrot, come onto the court to ‘‘show me the mark.’’ Perrot refused, and McEnroe took his case to the Grand Prix supervisor seated at courtside. Again, his pleas were rebuffed, and the point was awarded to Wilander, who won the game at love, then took one point after another until the set was completed.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5v_si2p1wxs

so much for all those that think his tirades were deliberate and that he always played better after them. here he has an all time collapse after an outburst (and he looks to be in the right here, that linesman acts rather unprofessional - shrugging his shoulders when he is asked to show the mark etc)
 

krosero

Legend
NY Times:

John McEnroe was fined $2,100 for three displays of temper today during a victory over Anders Jarryd in the semifinals of the $315,000 Stockholm Open tennis tournament.

The fine, if upheld, could result in a suspension that would threaten McEnroe's status for the Davis Cup final against Sweden Dec. 16.

McEnroe had to struggle for a 1-6, 7-6, 6-2 victory. He will play the final Monday against Mats Wilander, a 6-7, 6-3, 6-3 victor over Jimmy Connors in a brilliant match.

McEnroe was fined for slamming a ball into the stands, calling the umpire a ''jerk'' and hitting a soda can with his racquet during a changeover. If a player is fined more than $7,500 in a year, he is liable for a suspension ranging from 24 to 42 days. With this fine, McEnroe is over the limit, but he said he would appeal it. He has 10 days to do so, but if it is upheld, he could be forced to miss the cup final.

McEnroe admitted that he had misbehaved, but added that he did not appreciate the way the chair umpire and the linesmen had handled the match.

''Also, I'm mentally tired for the moment,'' he said. ''That is one of the reasons I lost my temper.''

Jarryd, who is now among four Swedes in the world's top 10, was angry, saying, ''It is very difficult to play against someone who behaves like McEnroe.''

The trouble started in the second game, when McEnroe hit a spectator with a ball he had boomed away in anger. That brought him his first penalty. He then lost 15 straight points.

The top-seeded American fought back in the second set. But serving at 4-2, he shouted at the umpire, ''Answer my question, jerk!'' That cost him a penalty point for verbal abuse. He eventually lost his serve. Moments later, he smashed the can on the court and was penalized a game for equipment abuse, making the score 4-4.

Wilander and Connors had the crowd enthralled in their semifinal, which lasted 2 hours 40 minutes. Wilander, who has never lost to Connors, served especially well and capitalized when Connors weakened on serve.​
 

krosero

Legend
Yet Mac still won the(infamous) match. Think its the only match listed where someone on the losing end of a streak went on to win the match. I'm guessing Jarryd won more total points that day.
Yes of the 26 men's matches listed it's the only loss.

The women have a shorter list but three of them were losses (Shvedova, Henin, Navratilova).
 

krosero

Legend
The Kovacs-Riggs match, this from Ray Bowers' history of the pro tours at http://www.tennisserver.com/lines/lines_07_03_19.html:

In the featured match at Trenton on December 27, Riggs and Kovacs put forth a "stirring struggle." Frank took the first six games, but after that Bobby began fencing off Frank's power drives and, contrary to his reputation, moving often into forecourt, producing volleying that to Fred Hawthorne was "nothing less than dazzling." Bobby's exertions in winning the second set, however, left him little resistance to Frank's fresh onslaught of power, and Kovacs took the first sixteen points of the third set enroute to a comfortable finish.​
 

BTURNER

Legend
Just for you, Bturner, and thanks for the correction :)

Palm Beach Post:

Quickly, Evert jumped ahead in the second set, breaking Mandlikova in the second set with a forehand pass. Evert stayed ahead, leading, 5-2, and, as late afternoon arrived, the crowd settled in for a decisive third set.

It never happened. In a few stunning moments that had to be among the most wrenching in Evert’s career, Mandlikova scored 14 consecutive points. She went from 2-5 down to 5-5 and ahead, 0-30, on Evert’s serve. No one, including Evert, knew quite how to react.

“I wasn’t really thinking about any streak or points in a row,” Evert said. “I was just trying to work and concentrate on each point.”

It wasn’t doing any good. Mandlikova held for 5-3 with two aces and two service winners. She broke to reach 5-4 with four winners, the last a forehand that must have looked like a BB as it approached Evert. She held for 5-all, even though Evert managed two strong returns. Each time, Mandlikova breezed across the grass and hit yet another winner.

The streak finally ended when Mandlikova pushed a forehand deep to let Evert reach 15-30. But at 30-40, Mandlikova attacked a second serve, came in and knocked off a forehand volley to lead 6-5. She shook a fist in the air and the only sound at Wimbledon was the buzz of shock throughout the old stadium.​
I recall it as exceptionally clean match from both. The winners to errors ratio was very high if my impressions mean much.
 

kiki

Banned
Hana needed the challenge and the motivation of playing against Evert or Navratilova ( or Graf) to play like that.

With her, you´d keep on watching till the storm broke through.

But you should pick the matches and the events; otherwise, you get dissapointed.
 

BTURNER

Legend
Hana needed the challenge and the motivation of playing against Evert or Navratilova ( or Graf) to play like that.

With her, you´d keep on watching till the storm broke through.

But you should pick the matches and the events; otherwise, you get dissapointed.
In this match Evert started out very strong and aggressive with an early break in the first. Hana met the challenge and played better to win the first. Evert then proceeded to play even better ,reaching the equivalent of her best grass court game. Well Hana exceeded that too. its the only match I ever saw where they were both bringing their 'A' game at the same time. One of my favorites.

It just wasn't fair that Evert should be denied again, sigh.
 
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krosero

Legend
Jarryd's streak against McEnroe might seem odd but Jarryd could be "streaky." A little bit in SI (June '85):

Jarryd made his move in singles at the 1983 Canadian Open, in which he upset Eliot Teltscher, Gerulaitis and McEnroe before losing to Lendl in the finals. Jarryd's terrific hands and mobility—developed by playing bandy on the ice back home—have made up for his unorthodox style on serve and at net. Some of Jarryd's twisted-arm, jumbled-leg saving volleys are framed in the Bureau of Silly Gets. When on a roll, however, he is virtually unstoppable. Forget "reading" him. Jarryd led McEnroe 6-2, 3-0, 40-30 at the Masters in January before he admittedly choked. "I don't remember ever being beaten that badly for a set and a half," Mac said.​
 

kiki

Banned
In this match Evert started out very strong and aggressive with an early break in the first. Hana met the challenge and played better to win the first. Evert then proceeded to play even better ,reaching the equivalent of her best grass court game. Well Hana exceeded that too. its the only match I ever saw where they were both bringing their 'A' game at the same time. One of my favorites.

It just wasn't fair that Evert should be denied again, sigh.
I was thinking what could have happened to Hana if she hadn´t crumbled into nerves at her first Wimbly final against Evert.Chris gave her such a big lesson.But after her 1980 USO match, and her exhuberant form that summer of 1981, few wouldn´t give her a big chance at Wimbledon, specially after she beat two times champ Martina Navratilova.

That Wimbledon also brought us Shriver first win against her old nemesis Tracy Austin.

Evert played some of her best tennis as well.I think Hana wanted to beat Evert badly at London, possibly more than anywhere else since that 1981 final left her deep marks inside.
 
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krosero

Legend
A new near-record for the women, at Chicago in '86:

http://articles.latimes.com/1986-11-15/sports/sp-3627_1_johan-kriek

Martina Navratilova extended her winning streak to 47 matches with a 6-2, 7-6 victory over Gabriela Sabatini of Argentina in a $150,000 women's tournament at Chicago.

Also advancing to the semifinals were second-seeded Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia, fourth-seeded Pam Shriver and eighth-seeded Zina Garrison.

Mandlikova defeated Claudia Kohde-Kilsch of West Germany, 6-4, 7-5; Shriver beat Kathy Rinaldi, 6-3, 6-4, and Garrison ousted Katerina Maleeva of Bulgaria, 7-5, 6-1.

In the Garrison-Maleeva match, Garrison won 23 consecutive points--including the first 21 points of the second set.​
 

krosero

Legend
Virginia Slims Championships March '86:

Hana Mandlikova, the world's fifth-ranked player, was relaxing on a sofa in the players' lounge in Madison Square Garden last Friday, musing on why it is impossible—or nearly so—for most of the women to beat the two mega-stars, Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert Lloyd, on the women's tour.

"Any time I step on the court," says Mandlikova, "I believe I can beat Chris. The other players don't and that's the wrong attitude. Same with Martina. Nobody believes they can beat her. I do." No wonder. While Mandlikova is only 5-18 lifetime against Evert Lloyd and 6-18 against Navratilova, her record against those two is by far the best on the tour.

Then, Mandlikova shook her head in disgust at the way Terry Phelps was "actually laughing on the court" while losing 6-1, 6-0 to Navratilova earlier in the first round of the 16-player, $500,000 Virginia Slims Championships last week. Nor did Hana go for Phelps's sighing comment later: "I can't beat her." Sniffed Mandlikova, "You have to at least believe, even if they are better, older, wiser."

The next afternoon, Mandlikova—playing like a woman possessed and punctuating her play with a sailor's vocabulary—backed up her words with action. In winning 6-3, 7-5, she didn't simply beat Evert Lloyd, she devastated her. Proof? Uncharacteristically, Evert Lloyd didn't appear for Sunday's match for third place against the West German phenom, 16-year-old Steffi Graf. Evert Lloyd, a Garden spokesman explained, was exhausted. And in a slump. The previous week in Dallas, Evert Lloyd had been wiped out by Navratilova 6-2, 6-1 in the finals of a tour event. It was Evert Lloyd's worst loss to Navratilova since a 6-2, 6-0 defeat at Amelia Island, Fla. in April 1984.

Mandlikova wore out Evert Lloyd, emotionally and physically. At one stretch early on, Mandlikova blazed through 10 straight points. Most telling, she won 23 points at the net compared with Evert Lloyd's three; she had 34 placement winners to Evert Lloyd's 14. Afterward, Chris said coolly of her conqueror, "She hit some good balls." Mandlikova was more charitable to herself, conceding, "That's close to as best as I can play."

Then came Mandlikova's Sunday afternoon final against Navratilova. The last time they had met in New York, Hana beat Martina to win the 1985 U.S. Open. She took the court with fire in her eyes, clearly believing in her ability to dispatch Martina just as she had Chris. It took Navratilova, oh, perhaps a minute and a half to disabuse her of such notions. Navratilova—hitting every shot imaginable and some not—hung up 6-2 and 6-0 sets with eight- and 10-point runs, service breaks at every turn and total brilliance all over the court. Now it was time for Navratilova to do the conceding: Well, she said, she couldn't think of a set, ever, in which she had played better than the 6-0. And that covers a lot of years of brilliance.

In every other women's tournament, Navratilova would have been a straight-sets victor, but the Virginia Slims Championships call for a best-of-five final. And when Mandlikova somehow gathered herself and won the third set 6-3, making a service break in the fourth game hold up, the crowd was ready to settle in for a long afternoon. However, Navratilova regained her form and raced through a 6-1 set to wrap up the championship and collect the winner's share of $125,000. Already in 1986, Navratilova has won 26 of her 27 matches.

So how did Hana feel in the fourth set as the verdict against her was being delivered? "I believed I could still win. I felt good." And it's this can-do attitude that, after eight years on the tour and 24 victories, sets Hana apart from her colleagues.​

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1064649/index.htm
 

krosero

Legend
From 2010 RG:

PARIS -- Early on, Serena Williams knocked dirt from her shoes by angrily whacking them with her racket, as if punishing the clay that keeps tripping her up at the French Open.

The top-ranked Williams stumbled in the quarterfinals Wednesday, squandering a match point and losing to Australian spoiler Samantha Stosur 6-2, 6-7 (2), 8-6.

A 12-time Grand Slam champion, Williams won her only French Open title in 2002 and hasn't been to the semifinals since 2003.

"I guess it's a redundant story with me," she said. "It was my match, and I lost it."

The upset was the second in a row for the No. 7-seeded Stosur and the third in as many days at Roland Garros. Stosur ended four-time champion Justine Henin's French Open winning streak at 24 matches in the fourth round.

On the men's side Tuesday, top-ranked Roger Federer lost to Robin Soderling.

Then Williams made her exit, with stretches of brilliant tennis by Stosur hastening the departure. The Australian, long regarded as a doubles specialist, used her forceful forehand to build a lead, winning 17 consecutive points during one stretch.

Williams mounted one of her patented comebacks, and as the tension built in an error-filled third set, she needed only one point in the 10th game for the victory.

Her forehand sailed an inch long.

Stosur then regained her early form. She hit consecutive cross-court winners to break for a 7-6 lead and then served out the victory, hitting service winners on the final three points.

"I've calmed down a little bit since walking off the court," a smiling Stosur said 90 minutes after the match. "But I'm pretty happy with myself."

It was Williams' first Grand Slam loss since her meltdown in the semifinals of the U.S. Open last September against Kim Clijsters. This time she directed any anger only at herself -- and her shoes.​

http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/french10/news/story?id=5242037
 

krosero

Legend
From 2012 French:

Williams made many errors in the match’s late stages, but she played well early on. She won the first set and seemed ready to wrap up the match when she led 5-1 in the second-set tiebreaker. But at 5-2, Williams moved into position to hit a loopy Razzano shot but didn’t swing, thinking the ball would land out. It didn’t, and then she became tense and made several errors. Razzano, already suffering from a calf cramp, ticked off 13 consecutive points and soon led 5-0 in the third set.​

http://blogs.wsj.com/dailyfix/2012/05/29/williams-loses-in-french-open-stunner/
 

krosero

Legend
Here's another streak in a loss (this one by Serena):

In the first four games of the match, it was clear this match would be different for Williams than her first three.

Her second service game went to six deuces, with Lisicki chasing down everything. When Williams closed out the game with an ace, she let out a loud, “Come on!”

But Williams failed to convert several break point opportunities, and was broken herself in the sixth game, making four straight errors to go down, 2-4. Then Lisicki broke Williams at love to win the first set, 6-2.

It seemed as if Williams had turned the match for good early in the second set. She broke Lisicki at love in the third game during a stretch of winning 14 consecutive points. Williams had two more service breaks to close out the set, 6-1.

She then earned a break early in the third set. In the second game, Lisicki was up by 40-0, and Williams battled back to earn break point, which she won when a Lisicki forehand went wide.

But in a match full of momentum swings, there was still time for more. Up, 40-15, in the fifth game of the set, Williams got a bit cute with drop shots and made a handful of backhand errors to give Lisicki the break back.

That began a streak of three straight breaks of serve. In the eighth game, serving at 3-4, Lisicki fell behind by 0-40 but rallied with impeccable ground strokes and a timely ace to finally hold serve.

Lisicki won the next two games to close out the match, keeping Williams off balance with big serves out wide and chasing down everything Williams sent back at her.​

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/02/sports/tennis/wimbledon-sabine-lisicki-beats-serena-williams.html?_r=0
 

krosero

Legend
One by Evert in an '85 loss to Kathy Jordan:

NEW YORK — Kathy Jordan, playing a surprising backcourt game, shocked second-seeded Chris Evert Lloyd and Czechoslovakia`s Hana Mandlikova, the No. 3 seed, ousted Andrea Temesvari of Hungary in the $500,000 Virginia Slims Tennis Championships Tuesday night.

Jordan upset Evert 6-2, 1-6, 6-2 and Mandlikova ousted Temesvari 7-5, 7-5.

It was only the third time in 10 career meetings that Jordan, a right- hander from King of Prussia, Pa., had bested the world`s No. 2 player -- the first coming at Wimbledon in 1983.

``My game is serve-and-volley,`` Jordan said in explaining the change to staying in baseline rallies against Evert. ``I just wanted to keep the ball in play as long as I could and not let her have any angles to run me around the court with.``

That she did, and with the hard-fought victory, Jordan, ranked 12th on the Women`s Tennis Association computer, advanced to a second-round meeting against Kathy Rinaldi in this elite 16-player field.

``She has a good game to beat my style of play,`` Evert said of Jordan. ``And she really hit her backhand really well. Usually she`ll miss a few backhands.

``She sliced very well, served very well and didn`t make any errors from the back of the court. She played a smart game and I give her a lot of credit for that.``

Mandlikova and Temesvari took turns breaking serve. But Mandlikova moved into the second round by capturing the last two games in both sets.

The Czech`s second-found foe will be determined tonight when seventh- seeded Zina Garrison plays West Germany`s Sylvia Hanika.

The seven-day tournament at Madison Square Garden, which culminates the yearlong Virginia Slims Series, winds up Sunday with a best-of-five-sets final -- unique in women`s tennis -- with $125,000 going to the winner.

Defending champion Martina Navratilova, the No. 1 seed, will play her first-round match Wednesday night against Lisa Bonder.

Known for her serve-and-volley tactics, Jordan, 25, surprisingly played a baseline game against Evert, known as the ultimate baseline player. Yet, increduously, it was Jordan who proved to be the steadiest in their long rallies.

``(Evert) wins most of the crucial points,`` Jordan said after the match. ``I was just a little more determined . . . I wanted to win the crucial points.``

Jordan broke Evert`s service to open the match, but Evert is known for her slow starts. Then, in the fifth game, Jordan broke serve again, then held her own to pull out to a 5-1 lead.

After Jordan wrapped up the first set, she attempted to continue her success as Evert served the first game of the second set. But Evert fought off five break points before finally holding serve.

Evert ripped off 13 consecutive points as she rolled out to a 3-0 lead, which she later increased to 4-0, breaking Jordan`s serve in the fourth game. And although she lost her own service in the fifth game, it was of no consequence as she took the next two to level the match at one set apiece.

It looked as if Evert one of the favorites to reach the final, was on the verge of chalking up her 1,020th career match victory. Instead, it was Jordan who was on the brink of one of the biggest victories of her career.

Jordan jumped out to a 3-0 lead, breaking Evert`s service in the second game. And, continuing her brilliant groundstrokes -- slicing her backhand and using topspin on the forehand side -- Jordan kept Evert pinned to the baseline most of the time.

The Madison Square Garden crowd was strongly behind Evert, urging her on throughout, but it simply was not to be.​

http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/1985-03-20/sports/8501100918_1_kathy-jordan-crucial-points-chris-evert-lloyd
 
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