Rest in peace Pancho Segura

Dan Lobb

G.O.A.T.
BBC just broke the news during the WTF final.

A legend who sadly few will have ever seen or even heard of.

There's a lot of fighting on here but hopefully we can come together to celebrate the life and career of Pancho.
One of that greatest generation of pro players from the fifties, three time winner of the U.S. Pro (1950, 1951, 1964),
and winner of two Kramer majors, (1957 Sydney Tournament of Champions, 1958 L.A. Masters).

A true giant, and underrated great.
 

thrust

Hall of Fame
BBC just broke the news during the WTF final.

A legend who sadly few will have ever seen or even heard of.

There's a lot of fighting on here but hopefully we can come together to celebrate the life and career of Pancho.
INDEED! The only time I saw Segura play was on TV. He and his partner were playing Gonzalez and who ever his partner was. On one point Segura was at the net when Gonzalez hit a shot right at him as hard as he could. Somehow Segura managed to hit a perfect volley winner, which brought a look and reaction of joy I have rarely seen by any other tennis player. I have read that he would offer advice to opponents, in the same match, as to how to beat the other guy. Everyone seemed to love him, for his joy of playing tennis and his great court tactics. He, indeed, was One of a kind!
 

thrust

Hall of Fame
BBC just broke the news during the WTF final.

A legend who sadly few will have ever seen or even heard of.

There's a lot of fighting on here but hopefully we can come together to celebrate the life and career of Pancho.
INDEED! The only time I saw Segura play was on TV. He and his partner were playing Gonzalez and who ever his partner was. On one point Segura was at the net when Gonzalez hit a shot right at him as hard as he could. Somehow Segura managed to hit a perfect volley winner, which brought a look and reaction of joy I have rarely seen by any other tennis player. I have read that he would offer advice to opponents, in the same match, as to how to beat the other guy. Everyone seemed to love him, for his joy of playing tennis and his great court tactics. He, indeed, was One of a kind!
 

Waspsting

Hall of Fame
One handed backhand to go along with the famous two handed forehand.... did not know that, had assumed he was double handed on the other side too

Given how highly regarded his forehand was, I wonder why others didn't/don't try to copy it more... only one I know of is Monica Seles

But here's his protégé Jimmy Connors hitting his famous two-handed backhand... identical of method to the mentor's forehand

 

hoodjem

G.O.A.T.
Oh no. Not Pequeño Pancho.:(

Inventor of the two-handed forehand, one of the most feared shots in tennis history.
Also a marvelous tactician.

A true giant who belies his moniker.
He overscame a great deal, and triumphed.

We will miss you, Segoo.
 

pc1

G.O.A.T.
I haven't been posting lately for various reasons but I felt I had to post now in tribute for the great Pancho Segura.

I feel that with Pancho Segura's passing we have lost one of the greatest contributors to Professional Tennis in history. It is arguable that no one has done more for the game than Pancho Segura. He was perhaps the greatest tennis mind in history. He has helped or coached many players like Hoad, Rosewall and Jimmy Connors. He was a man who truly loved the game of tennis and was competitive as a player up until the early 1960s when he was in his forties.

I spoke several months ago with a former great player about the Old Pro Tour. During the interview the conversation involved the discussion of Pancho Segura and his great two handed forehand. Many former players and experts like Kramer, Vines, Riggs have called it the greatest single shot they have ever seen. Rod Laver, who did not play Segura until Segura was in his forties said Segura's forehand was the best he ever faced and Laver faced a lot of great forehands. Anyway this former player who is very sharp and has seen greats like Federer, Nadal, Newcombe, Borg, Lendl and their great forehands had no hesitation in naming Segura's forehand as the best he ever saw! What stunned me was that he said it with absolutely no doubt in his mind! He mentioned how Segura's forehand was so well disguised that you couldn't know what he was going to do. That seems to be what is often mentioned about the forehand of Segura, that aside from the great power, unerring consistency and versatility, that he could just change his shot at the last second and the player wouldn't know what to do. The forehand was almost hit the same way as Jimmy Connors' lefty backhand and I'm relatively certain that Segura influenced Connors in the way he hit the ball. We all know how great the lefty two handed backhand of Connors was but those who saw both seem to almost unanimously agree the Segura forehand was clearly superior, some say much better!

Segura is an underrated great in the game. He was overshadowed by greats like Jack Kramer and Pancho Gonzalez during his heyday in the 1950s but he did have his share of great wins like the times he defeated Gonzalez in the US Pro. He was competitive against against Kramer and Gonzalez in the 1950s in their tours, losing I believe 64 to 28 to Kramer and in a multiplayer tour with Sedgman, losing 31 to 20 or 30 to 20 to Gonzalez but defeating Sedgman 23 to 22 on that same tour. To defeat Sedgman, who was an awesome player and winning 20 matches out of around 50 from the great Gonzalez is a great feat. Some like Vines have ranked Segura just behind Laver which may be a little much but still shows the respect and great strength Segura had as a player.

I think Segura an example of how sometimes records do not show the true greatness of the player. He had a super level of play but was often stopped by all time greats in their primes.

Segura moved well, had a solid and strong sliced backhand plus his volley was great. Some believe his volley was superior to even Laver's. His serve was good but not great and of course he had that great forehand.

What isn't mentioned is how he was a great crowd attraction in his day. People loved to see Segura play.

He was still very sharp even in his later years. We were discussing the serve and volley game at the Shelter Rock Club and he did bring some interesting comments about it just a few years ago.

Here's a video of Segura defeating Sedgman in one of the Tournament of Champions in the 1950s.
http://www.gettyimages.com/license/594665767
 
Last edited:

KG1965

Legend
I haven't been posting lately for various reasons but I felt I had to post now in tribute for the great Pancho Segura.

I feel that with Pancho Segura's passing we have lost one of the greatest contributors to Professional Tennis in history. It is arguably that no one has done more for the game than Pancho Segura. He was perhaps the greatest tennis mind in history. He has helped or coached many players like Hoad, Rosewall and Jimmy Connors. He was a man who truly loved the game of tennis and was competitive as a player up until the early 1960s when he was in his forties.

I spoke several months ago with a former great player about the Old Pro Tour. During the interview the conversation involved the discussion of Pancho Segura and his great two handed forehand. Many former players and experts like Kramer, Vines, Riggs have called it the greatest single shot they have ever seen. Rod Laver, who did not play Segura until Segura was in his forties said Segura's forehand was the best he ever faced and Laver faced a lot of great forehand. Anyway this former player who is very sharp and has seen greats like Federer, Nadal, Newcombe, Borg, Lendl and their great forehands had no hesitation in naming Segura's forehand as the best he ever saw! What stunned me was that he said it with absolutely no doubt in his mind! He mentioned how Segura's forehand was so well disguised that you couldn't know what he was going to do. That seems to be what is often mentioned about the forehand of Segura, that aside from the great power, unerring consistency and versatility, that he could just change his shot at the last second and the player wouldn't know what to do. The forehand was almost hit the same way as Jimmy Connors' lefty backhand and I'm relatively certain that Segura influenced Connors in the way he hit the ball. We all know how great the lefty two handed backhand of Connors was but those who saw both seem to almost unanimously agree the Segura forehand was clearly superior, some say much better!

Segura is an underrated great in the game. He was overshadowed by greats like Jack Kramer and Pancho Gonzalez during his heyday in the 1950s but he did have his share of great wins like the times he defeated Gonzalez in the US Pro. He was competitive against against Kramer and Gonzalez in the 1950s in their tours, losing I believe 64 to 28 to Kramer and in a multiplayer tour with Sedgman, losing 31 to 20 or 30 to 20 to Gonzalez but defeating Sedgman 23 to 22 on that same tour. To defeat Sedgman, who was an awesome player and winning 20 matches out of around 50 from the great Gonzalez is a great feat. Some like Vines have ranked Segura just behind Laver which may be a little much but still shows the respect and great strength Segura had as a player.

I think Segura an example of how sometimes records do not show the true greatness of the player. He had a super level of play but was often stopped by all time greats in their primes.

Segura moved well, had a solid and strong sliced backhand plus his volley was great. Some believe his volley was superior to even Laver's. His serve was good but not great and of course he had that great forehand.

What isn't mentioned is how he was a great crowd attraction in his day. People loved to see Segura play.

He was still very sharp even in his later years. We were discussing the serve and volley game at the Shelter Rock Club and he did bring some interesting comments about it just a few years ago.

Here's a video of Segura defeating Sedgman in one of the Tournament of Champions in the 1950s.
http://www.gettyimages.com/license/594665767
A great memory.
 

KG1965

Legend
I haven't been posting lately for various reasons but I felt I had to post now in tribute for the great Pancho Segura.

I feel that with Pancho Segura's passing we have lost one of the greatest contributors to Professional Tennis in history. It is arguably that no one has done more for the game than Pancho Segura. He was perhaps the greatest tennis mind in history. He has helped or coached many players like Hoad, Rosewall and Jimmy Connors. He was a man who truly loved the game of tennis and was competitive as a player up until the early 1960s when he was in his forties.

I spoke several months ago with a former great player about the Old Pro Tour. During the interview the conversation involved the discussion of Pancho Segura and his great two handed forehand. Many former players and experts like Kramer, Vines, Riggs have called it the greatest single shot they have ever seen. Rod Laver, who did not play Segura until Segura was in his forties said Segura's forehand was the best he ever faced and Laver faced a lot of great forehand. Anyway this former player who is very sharp and has seen greats like Federer, Nadal, Newcombe, Borg, Lendl and their great forehands had no hesitation in naming Segura's forehand as the best he ever saw! What stunned me was that he said it with absolutely no doubt in his mind! He mentioned how Segura's forehand was so well disguised that you couldn't know what he was going to do. That seems to be what is often mentioned about the forehand of Segura, that aside from the great power, unerring consistency and versatility, that he could just change his shot at the last second and the player wouldn't know what to do. The forehand was almost hit the same way as Jimmy Connors' lefty backhand and I'm relatively certain that Segura influenced Connors in the way he hit the ball. We all know how great the lefty two handed backhand of Connors was but those who saw both seem to almost unanimously agree the Segura forehand was clearly superior, some say much better!

Segura is an underrated great in the game. He was overshadowed by greats like Jack Kramer and Pancho Gonzalez during his heyday in the 1950s but he did have his share of great wins like the times he defeated Gonzalez in the US Pro. He was competitive against against Kramer and Gonzalez in the 1950s in their tours, losing I believe 64 to 28 to Kramer and in a multiplayer tour with Sedgman, losing 31 to 20 or 30 to 20 to Gonzalez but defeating Sedgman 23 to 22 on that same tour. To defeat Sedgman, who was an awesome player and winning 20 matches out of around 50 from the great Gonzalez is a great feat. Some like Vines have ranked Segura just behind Laver which may be a little much but still shows the respect and great strength Segura had as a player.

I think Segura an example of how sometimes records do not show the true greatness of the player. He had a super level of play but was often stopped by all time greats in their primes.

Segura moved well, had a solid and strong sliced backhand plus his volley was great. Some believe his volley was superior to even Laver's. His serve was good but not great and of course he had that great forehand.

What isn't mentioned is how he was a great crowd attraction in his day. People loved to see Segura play.

He was still very sharp even in his later years. We were discussing the serve and volley game at the Shelter Rock Club and he did bring some interesting comments about it just a few years ago.

Here's a video of Segura defeating Sedgman in one of the Tournament of Champions in the 1950s.
http://www.gettyimages.com/license/594665767
A great post to remind the man.
 

Dan Lobb

G.O.A.T.
I haven't been posting lately for various reasons but I felt I had to post now in tribute for the great Pancho Segura.

I feel that with Pancho Segura's passing we have lost one of the greatest contributors to Professional Tennis in history. It is arguable that no one has done more for the game than Pancho Segura. He was perhaps the greatest tennis mind in history. He has helped or coached many players like Hoad, Rosewall and Jimmy Connors. He was a man who truly loved the game of tennis and was competitive as a player up until the early 1960s when he was in his forties.

I spoke several months ago with a former great player about the Old Pro Tour. During the interview the conversation involved the discussion of Pancho Segura and his great two handed forehand. Many former players and experts like Kramer, Vines, Riggs have called it the greatest single shot they have ever seen. Rod Laver, who did not play Segura until Segura was in his forties said Segura's forehand was the best he ever faced and Laver faced a lot of great forehands. Anyway this former player who is very sharp and has seen greats like Federer, Nadal, Newcombe, Borg, Lendl and their great forehands had no hesitation in naming Segura's forehand as the best he ever saw! What stunned me was that he said it with absolutely no doubt in his mind! He mentioned how Segura's forehand was so well disguised that you couldn't know what he was going to do. That seems to be what is often mentioned about the forehand of Segura, that aside from the great power, unerring consistency and versatility, that he could just change his shot at the last second and the player wouldn't know what to do. The forehand was almost hit the same way as Jimmy Connors' lefty backhand and I'm relatively certain that Segura influenced Connors in the way he hit the ball. We all know how great the lefty two handed backhand of Connors was but those who saw both seem to almost unanimously agree the Segura forehand was clearly superior, some say much better!

Segura is an underrated great in the game. He was overshadowed by greats like Jack Kramer and Pancho Gonzalez during his heyday in the 1950s but he did have his share of great wins like the times he defeated Gonzalez in the US Pro. He was competitive against against Kramer and Gonzalez in the 1950s in their tours, losing I believe 64 to 28 to Kramer and in a multiplayer tour with Sedgman, losing 31 to 20 or 30 to 20 to Gonzalez but defeating Sedgman 23 to 22 on that same tour. To defeat Sedgman, who was an awesome player and winning 20 matches out of around 50 from the great Gonzalez is a great feat. Some like Vines have ranked Segura just behind Laver which may be a little much but still shows the respect and great strength Segura had as a player.

I think Segura an example of how sometimes records do not show the true greatness of the player. He had a super level of play but was often stopped by all time greats in their primes.

Segura moved well, had a solid and strong sliced backhand plus his volley was great. Some believe his volley was superior to even Laver's. His serve was good but not great and of course he had that great forehand.

What isn't mentioned is how he was a great crowd attraction in his day. People loved to see Segura play.

He was still very sharp even in his later years. We were discussing the serve and volley game at the Shelter Rock Club and he did bring some interesting comments about it just a few years ago.

Here's a video of Segura defeating Sedgman in one of the Tournament of Champions in the 1950s.
http://www.gettyimages.com/license/594665767
Here is some classic footage of Segura from a 1950 visit to Quito, Ecuador, his home area.

Segura won the U.S. Pro that year, with a great comeback against Kramer in the semifinal, on clay at Cleveland.

 
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