Roddick states he wouldn't be able to beat the top players today.

Meles

Bionic Poster
Roddick states he could not beat the likes of Medvedev, Zverev, and other great movers in today's game around 7:30.
Probably worth starting around the 7 minute mark to get the full context.

He attributes this to luxilon (poly strings) and how it changed the game. He even had his doubts about Sampras competing or having a high degree of success because he didn't quite have the movement (of course Roddick would have played or seen and old Sampras who was near retirement.) Roddick stated in another video that he was the 2nd best player on grass for five years (probably an exaggeration), but his grass runs when he was making finals were hardly dominant with generally around 53% points won or less. Fed was an amazing 55 to 56% points won at his Wimby runs and in 2007 he was an astounding 58.4%.o_O He explains that the modern poly game makes passing shots much more effective and so the power players of the past would have had a lot of trouble.

Pretty much we have more very strong evidence that poly was technology that changed the game massively (on par perhaps with the transition from wood to graphite rackets.) Agassi also confirms the impact on his own game in his book. Its not been directly spoken about, but I'm pretty sure players like Blake, Roddick, and Hewitt did not switch to poly until after Australian Open 2004. Clay courters were using it long before this (Kuerton had it as his tech advantage for first RG title) and perhaps Safin much earlier, but I'd contend seeing what Fed was doing down under made it obvious they had to change away from full gut. In the ladies game I don't think Serena Williams switched until Patrick started coaching her, but for the men I don't think anyone was using full gut after 2004.
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
nowhere.jpg
 

Thundergod

Hall of Fame
Well yea obviously if you give him the old equipment he can't hang. If he grew up with the new stuff like these guys, then of course he would be able to beat most of them.

This is like what I hear in basketball where of course the players are more athletic now, but they don't factor in that even up to the early 2000s, the training methods were junk compared to now.
 
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FloridaAG

Hall of Fame
That is actually a relatively minor part of what he said. His main point was that you have to be an elite mover to win a slam at this point in time and a mediocre mover like him could not win a slam now. He also said you have to be a complete player - which he admits he was not
 

daggerman

Hall of Fame
Of course he wouldn't. That's obvious to anyone who doesn't have an agenda. Doesn't mean he wasn't great in his time, or that if he were born 10+ years later he wouldn't have been even better.
 

Devilito

Legend
That is actually a relatively minor part of what he said. His main point was that you have to be an elite mover to win a slam at this point in time and a mediocre mover like him could not win a slam now. He also said you have to be a complete player - which he admits he was not
In the 80s and 90s being a complete player was impossible because every surface was vastly different and required different play styles and strategies and equipment tech didn't bail you out. Carlos is complete in the sense that every surface and tournament today plays relativity the same so the best player at one tournament is pretty much the best player at any tournament. This also makes tennis boring AF IMO
 

mike danny

Bionic Poster
That is actually a relatively minor part of what he said. His main point was that you have to be an elite mover to win a slam at this point in time and a mediocre mover like him could not win a slam now. He also said you have to be a complete player - which he admits he was not
None of the younger players are complete except Carlos and Jannik. Let’s not pretend like the 90’s born are epitomes of completeness.
 

Kralingen

Bionic Poster
We say all that, and yet he went 16-14 in the 5th with a guy who just 5 years ago was able to get to MP at Wimbledon. There is a very long and VERY robust list of players from “bygone generations” holding their own with the NextGen of their day - Nadal/Djokovic to Alcaraz/Sinner/Zverev/Medvedev, Federer to Djokovic/Nadal in the late 2010s, Agassi to Federer in the mid 2000s, Lendl, Mac, and Connors to Pete/Agassi, Borg to Lendl, Rosewall/Laver to Borg, Pancho to Laver…

List goes on and on.

Roddick may be right that the game has evolved with poly strings and that the average player moves more dynamically sliding into shots than 20 years ago… but rest assured, give him a few months to adapt and he’d be right up there in any era.

Humans are far more resilient than we give ourselves credit for.
 
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zvelf

Hall of Fame
In the 80s and 90s being a complete player was impossible because every surface was vastly different and required different play styles and strategies and equipment tech didn't bail you out. Carlos is complete in the sense that every surface and tournament today plays relativity the same so the best player at one tournament is pretty much the best player at any tournament. This also makes tennis boring AF IMO
This is funny because so many people in this forum say nobody but Djokovic knows how to play on grass these days, but if surfaces were really that homogenized, then this complaint has no merit.
 

The Guru

Legend
We say all that, and yet he went 16-14 in the 5th with a guy who just 5 years ago was able to get to MP at Wimbledon. There is a very long and VERY robust list of players from “bygone generations” holding their own with the NextGen of their day - Nadal/Djokovic to Alcaraz/Sinner/Zverev/Medvedev, Federer to Djokovic/Nadal in the late 2010s, Agassi to Federer in the mid 2000s, Lendl, Mac, and Connors to Pete/Agassi, Borg to Lendl, Rosewall/Laver to Borg, Pancho to Laver…

List goes on and on.

Roddick may be right that the game has evolved with poly strings and that the average player moves more dynamically sliding into shots than 20 years ago… but rest assured, give him a few months to adapt and he’d be right up there in any era.

Humans are far more resilient than we give ourselves credit for.
I don't think Roddick is saying he couldn't adjust to today (though he does seem to be saying he doesn't think he was athletic enough by today's standards) I think he was more saying if you just plopped his 2003 self into 2024 his game wouldn't translate so well.
 

GabeT

G.O.A.T.
Roddick has said this, or versions of this, many times

Obviously it’s impossible to know exactly how he would have fared but I think his key point, that players that do well under certain circumstances would not necessarily do well under different ones, is one that is both true and yet ignored by many posters here
 

GabeT

G.O.A.T.
Roddick may be right that the game has evolved with poly strings and that the average player moves more dynamically sliding into shots than 20 years ago… but rest assured, give him a few months to adapt and he’d be right up there in any era.

Humans are far more resilient than we give ourselves credit for.
I don’t think there’s anything to support this. I keep hearing versions of this (Player X from the past would have needed just a few weeks/months to adjust to new conditions) and yet what we do know about pro players is that even small changes like changing the type of racquet used can take years to adapt. Novak has said that tiny changes like adding or taking a few grams off his racquet is a decision that takes a while to make.

changes like the one Roddick describes would require redoing much of his career and training. Borg famously had years to change for, his old racquets and couldn’t do it.
 
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CHillTennis

Hall of Fame
Andy Roddick has exposed himself for being a puppet of the media.

They obviously think that we don't pay attention to the facts.

Because the last time that I checked, Roddick had a 5-4 record against Novak Djokovic.

The same guy that has been kicking the Next Gen's a** for the past 10 years.

So yes Andy, you would have a chance to win a slam in this era.

Even though you're just a paid shill, these days.

It's too bad that you didn't make enough money during your pro career.

I guess you'll have to spend your retirement shilling for the media and making embarrassing videos like the one that you made here.
 
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The Blond Blur

G.O.A.T.
I actually got to catch up with Andy earlier this week for dinner. We get together about once every two weeks or so to discuss how life’s going. We mostly keep it to every day things like how the wife and kids are, how his podcast has been going, and who the GOAT of tennis is etc. On this day we happened to be dining at his favorite restaurant, Josephine House. We had been eating for about 45 minutes, and in that timeframe he had at least 5 cocktails. Andy usually has better self control than that. But this wasn’t the first time he had overdone it on a Tuesday night out on the town. At first he was even more talkative than usual. I know, I know, Andy Roddick talkative? Who would have thought?! But the more he drank the quieter and distant he became. As the night wore on he appeared to become even more closed off, like he wasn’t really present. As I’ve know Andy for many years I was able to pick up on his rather peculiar body language. I tried to address his downtrodden mood multiple times, and he repeatedly rebuffed my concerns. The more I pressed the more agitated he seemed to become. But seeing as I had now seemingly hit a nerve I persisted. At first I suspected it was his food as he had barely touched it.

“It’s not the food. My steak has been cooked to perfection just the way I like it. Well done just like me in my many Wimbledon Fs failures!” He said with a laugh. “In fact I’m going to leave a 5 star Yelp review, and get this, a 20% tip! I bet it’ll make our servers night!” He momentarily lit up, but just as quickly the light in his eyes dimmed. I didn’t have the heart to tell him that 20% had become the industry norm in the last couple of years.

“Well if it’s not the steak, then what is it? Is it work, the kids, Brooklyn? What’s eating at you champ? Because you’re certainty not eating your steak?” I said with an awkward chuckle.

“No, no it’s none of that. Everything’s great. My podcast is the 8th most watched and subscribed podcast in the world. Before you know it I’ll even surpass the Joe Rogan Experience as the best podcast in the world! The kids are happy and healthy. They’re honestly the light of my world, and I couldn’t be more happy and proud to be their father. As far as Brooklyn goes, you know she was on the cover of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition back in the day, right? Let’s just say she’s still got it.” He said with a wry smile and a wink.

“Ok, well if it’s not work or family related what’s got you so down? You really don’t seem like yourself tonight. Usually you’re the one carrying this conversation. Like Federer carried your sorry generation of players for so long!” I said as I gave him a friendly punch on the shoulder.

“Ouch! Hey cut it out!” He cried. “That’s my shoulder that feels like Hamburger Helper that forced me into retirement!”

“Sorry, my bad. I forgot that was your bad shoulder. It’s just been so long since we last played. What’s it been, since 2019 at least? It was definitely pre-pandemic. Man that feels like a lifetime ago. We should get together again real soon and hit some balls for old times sake. Maybe even go a little crazy and play a practice set or two!”

“Yeah about that, that’s kind of what’s been bothering me.”

“What do you mean?” I asked while giving my long time friend a puzzled look.

“It’s just that lately I’ve been thinking. It’s really been gnawing at me actually. I’ve tried to push it deep down in the back of my mind, but I can’t deny it any longer.” Tears started to swell up in his eyes. I was growing ever more concerned for my friend. What was he going to say?

“What?! What is it?! What’s the mattered?!” I yelled almost hysterically.

With tears now cascading down his face he began to muttered in a choked up voice. “I-it’s j-just th-tha-that y-you’re b-be-bet-better th-than m-me a-at t-te-ten-tennis!”

“What?!”

“You’re better than me at tennis, alright!” He growled like only Andy could.

I was confused, bewildered even. Andy was a grand slam champion. The last true great American player even. I was no slouch sure, and my H2H record against him was a respectful 49-50 back in our junior years. But I had decided to pursue a higher education, whereas Andy continued his pursuit to become a professional tennis player. Needless to say I think we both made the right decision. Still though, my closest friend’s confession was the last thing I thought he’d say.

“What do you mean I’m better than you at tennis?!”

“It’s just that, you’re better than me. You name it, FH, BH, slice, ROS, volleying. I still have nightmares about that absolute sitter of a BH volley I that I bottled at 6-5 in the 2nd set in the 09 Wimby F. Don’t even get me started on your movement. They don’t call you @The Blond Blur for nothing! Hell, even your serve is better than mine!”

“Andy, come man, you know that’s not true. You’re just saying that to downplay your achievements because you’re so humble. Plus you’re so used to building up today’s sorry excuse for a field that you’ve gotten into this habit of really selling yourself short.”

“No, I mean it, you’re better than me and I’ve known it for a long time.” In fact part of me is almost glad that you didn’t go pro like me because you would have surpassed me had you continued to play. And who knows, I maybe don’t even become a one time slam champion with you around. I even think you could have taken a Wimby or two from my long time rival Roger Federer. Of course I use the word “rival” factiously.” He said while pantomiming air quotes.

I was stunned, I never would have expected Andy to regurgitate his career’s worth of baggage over our bi-monthly dinner. Curiosity started to get the better of me. I had come too far now. I really wanted to know what Andy thought of today’s field and how I would have performed had I chosen to pursue a life of tennis beyond the juniors.

“Andy, if you’re being for real with me right now man how do you think I would have stacked up against today’s players? You know, assuming I had reached my peak. Factoring in things like injuries of course. What do you think my schlem total would have been?” Andy always liked it when I intentionally mispronounced the word slam.

Andy then downed his 6th cocktail that night. With a loud gulp he cleared his throat. “You ever hear of Project 26?”

“Project 26? No, never what is it? What does it mean?”

Andy then took out his phone and appeared to be typing in a username and password. He spun his phone around and slid it over to me. He had just logged into a site I had never heard of before called “Talk Tennis Warehouse”. I was not prepared for what I saw next. At the top of the page was a circular avatar of the Quaker Oats mascot. I clicked on it and the username FedFosterWallace popped.

“Is this you? Are you supposed to be FedFosterWallace?”

“Well, the Toady cabal calls me Oats, but yeah that’s me.”

“I don’t understand, what does all this mean? What are you trying to tell me?”

Andy stood up, picked up his keys, laid down a crisp 100 dollar bill, and headed for the door.

“Come on.” He said “I’ll tell you all about it over Discord when I sober up.”

- To Be Continued
 
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socallefty

G.O.A.T.
If you’ve been attending tournaments over the decades, you would know that what Roddick is saying is hardly controversial. The shots are higher pace with higher spin at the top level on average and as a result, the movement has to be much faster to be able to play defense and hang in rallies. So, the players are much more athletic.

Also you no longer see players with big weaknesses on one wing or who have very quirky technique or even oddball styles - if you are not a power baseliner who has a good serve and is solid in all aspects, you can’t consistently be in the top 10 anymore. None of this was as true when Roddick was a player or in the three decades I watched pro tennis before that.

Go see tournaments in person like Roddick does and you will have the same opinion as him. Pro tennis on the ATP Tour is unbelievably fast and powerful these days.
 

MeatTornado

Talk Tennis Guru
I actually got to catch up with Andy earlier this week for lunch. We get together about once every two weeks or so to discuss how life’s going. We mostly keep it to every day things like how the wife and kids are, how his podcast had been going, and who the GOAT of tennis is etc. On this day we happened to be dining at his favorite restaurant, Josephine House. We had been eating for about 45 minutes, and in that timeframe he had at least 5 cocktails. Andy usually has better self control, but this wasn’t the first time he had overdone it on a Tuesday night out on the town. At first he was even more talkative than usual. I know, I know, Andy Roddick talkative? Who would have thought?! But the more he drank the quieter and distant he became. As the night wore on he appeared to become even more closed off, like he wasn’t really present. As I’ve know Andy for many years I was able to pick up on his rather peculiar body language. I tried to address his downtrodden mood multiple times, and he repeatedly rebuffed my concerns. The more I pressed the more agitated he seemed to get. But seeing as I had now seemingly hit a nerve I persisted. At first I suspected it was his food as he had barely touched it.

“It’s not the food. My steak has been cooked to perfection just the way I like it. Well done just like me in my many Wimbledon Fs failures!” He said with a laugh. “In fact I’m going to leave a 5 star Yelp review, and get this, a 20% tip! I bet it’ll make our servers night!” He momentarily lit up, but just as quickly his face dimmed. I didn’t have the heart to tell him that 20% had become the industry norm in the last couple of years.

“Well if it’s not the steak, then what is it? Is it work, the kids, Brooklyn? What’s eating at you champ? Because you’re certainty not eating your steak?” I said with an awkward chuckle.

“No, no it’s none of that. Everything’s great. My podcast is the 8th most watched and subscribed podcast in the world. Before you know it I’ll even surpass the Joe Rogan Experience as the best podcast in the world! The kids are happy and healthy. They’re honestly the light of my world, and I couldn’t be more happy and proud to be their father. As far as Brooklyn goes, you know she was on the cover of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition back in the day, right? Let’s just say she’s still got it.” He said with a wry smile and a wink.

“Ok, well if it’s not work or family related what’s got you so down? You really don’t seem like yourself tonight. Usually you’re the one carrying this conversation. Like Federer carried your sorry generation of players for so long!” I said as I gave him a friendly punch on the shoulder.

“Ouch! Hey cut it out!” He cried. “That’s my shoulder that feels like Hamburger Helper that forced me into retirement!”

“Sorry, my bad. I forgot that was your bad shoulder. It’s just been so long since we last played. What’s it been, since 2019 at least? It was definitely pre-pandemic. Man that feels like a lifetime ago. We should get together again real soon and hit some balls for old times sake. Maybe even go a little crazy and play a practice set or two!”

“Yeah about that, that’s kind of what’s been bothering me.”

“What do you mean?” I asked while giving my long time friend a puzzled look.

“It’s just that lately I’ve been thinking. It’s really been gnawing at me actually. I’ve tried to push it deep down in the back on my mind, but I can’t deny it any longer.” Tears started to swell up in his eyes. I was growing ever more concerned for my friend. What was he going to say?

“What?! What is it?! What’s the mattered?!” I yelled almost hysterically.

With tears now cascading down his face he began to muttered in a choked up voice. “I-it’s j-just th-tha-that y-you’re b-be-bet-better th-than m-me a-at t-te-ten-tennis!”

“What?!”

“You’re better than me at tennis, alright!” He growled like only Andy could.

I was confused, bewildered even. Andy was a grand slam champion. The last true great American player even. I was no slouch sure, and my H2H record against him was a respectful 49-50 back in our junior years. But I had decided to pursue a higher education, whereas Andy continued his pursuit to become a professional tennis player. Needless to say I think we both made the right decision. Still though, my closest friend’s confession was the last thing I thought he’d say.

“What do you mean I’m better than you at tennis?!”

“It’s just that, you’re better than me. You name it FH, BH, ROS, movement, volleying. Hell, even your serve is better than mine!”

“Andy, come man, you know that’s not true. You’re just saying that to downplay your achievements because you’re so humble. Plus you’re so used to building up today’s sorry excuse for a field that you’ve gotten into this habit of really selling yourself short.”

“No, I mean it, you’re better than me and I’ve known it for a long time.” In fact part of me is almost glad that you didn’t go pro like me because you would have surpassed me had you continued to play. And who knows, I maybe don’t even become a one time slam champion with you around. I even think you could have taken a Wimby or two from my long time rival Roger Federer. Of course I use the word “rival” factiously.” He said while pantomiming air quotes.

I was stunned, I never would have expected Andy to regurgitate his career’s worth of baggage over our bi-monthly dinner. Curiosity started to get the better of me. I had come too far now. I really wanted to know what Andy thought of today’s field and how I would have performed had I chosen to pursue a life of tennis beyond the juniors.

“Andy, if you’re being for real with me right now man how do you think I would have stacked up against today’s players? You know, assuming I had reached my peak. Factoring in things like injuries of course. What do you think my schlem total would have been?” Andy always likes when I intentionally mispronounce slam.

Andy then down his 6th cocktail that night. With a loud gulp he cleared his throat. “You ever hear of Project 26?”

“Project 26? No, never what is it? What does it mean?”

Andy then took out his phone and appeared to be typing in a username and password. He spun his phone around and slid it over to me. He had just logged into a site I had never heard of before called “Talk Tennis Warehouse”. I was not prepared for what I saw next. At the top of the page was a circular avatar of the Quaker Oats mascot. I clicked on it and the username FedFosterWallace popped.

“Is this you? Are you supposed to be FedFosterWallace?”

“Well, the Toady cabal calls me Oats, but yeah that’s me.”

“I don’t understand, what does all this mean? What are you trying to tell me?”

Andy stood up, picked up his keys, laid down a crisp 100 dollar billed, and headed for the door.

“Come on.” He said I’ll tell you all about it over Discord when I sober up.”

- To Be Continued
That was quite an adventure.
 

GabeT

G.O.A.T.
If you’ve been attending tournaments over the decades, you would know that what Roddick is saying is hardly controversial. The shots are higher pace with higher spin at the top level on average and as a result, the movement has to be much faster to be able to play defense and hang in rallies. So, the players are much more athletic.

Also you no longer see players with big weaknesses on one wing or who have very quirky technique or even oddball styles - if you are not a power baseliner who has a good serve and is solid in all aspects, you can’t consistently be in the top 10 anymore. None of this was as true when Roddick was a player or in the three decades I watched pro tennis before that.

Go see tournaments in person like Roddick does and you will have the same opinion as him. Pro tennis on the ATP Tour is unbelievably fast and powerful these days.
This is why I always ask those that claim they know who would win hypothetical matches to predict real ones. Show us you actually have a working model of tennis levels in your brain.

am still waiting
 

JustMy2Cents

Hall of Fame
I don’t think there’s anything to support this. I keep hearing versions of this (Player X from the past would have needed just a few weeks/months to adjust to new conditions) and yet what we do know about pro players is that even small changes like changing the type of racquet used can take years to adapt. Novak has said that tiny changes like adding or taking a few grams off his racquet is a decision that takes a while to make.

changes like the one Roddick describes would require redoing much of his career and training. Borg famously had years to change for, his old racquets and couldn’t do it.
unlearning takes more time than learning something new.

what people mean when they say old players would adapt is the scenario where that player is put into the new timeline from their career beginning.
if a 6yr old roddick is dropped into whichever timeline, his basic handeye coordination would propel him into top tier
 

weakera

Talk Tennis Guru
Andy is also the most self-deprecating athlete I've ever heard. He thinks every win he had against his own era's competition was nothing short of a miracle.

Forget Med and Zed, he probably doesn't think he could beat Mannarino or Bublik.

Federer really ruined him
 

CHillTennis

Hall of Fame
Andy then took out his phone and appeared to be typing in a username and password. He spun his phone around and slid it over to me. He had just logged into a site I had never heard of before called “Talk Tennis Warehouse”. I was not prepared for what I saw next. At the top of the page was a circular avatar of the Quaker Oats mascot. I clicked on it and the username FedFosterWallace popped.

“Is this you? Are you supposed to be FedFosterWallace?”

“Well, the Toady cabal calls me Oats, but yeah that’s me.”

“I don’t understand, what does all this mean? What are you trying to tell me?”
:-D
 

fedfan24

Hall of Fame
Tennis has evolved so much, that it’s amazing how slowed down versions of Nadal and Djokovic have been able to win 11 slams since 2020 in their mid 30s.

Straight shooters like Nadal, Davydenko tell it as it is. Its usually the shills like Roddick and other tennis media that are literally paid / in their interest to hype the game.
 

The Guru

Legend
I do wonder if he'd still be the same guy today anyway, or if he'd have an unbearable ego if he'd won Wimbledon 2-3 times.
I think people misread this on Roddick's end it takes a lot self-confidence to be so publicly self deprecating and he's usually doing it for the sake of humor. I'm sure Roddick is a confident guy that is tremendously proud of what he achieved and knows that he had a hall of fame career and was an amazing player.
 

Kralingen

Bionic Poster
I don’t think there’s anything to support this. I keep hearing versions of this (Player X from the past would have needed just a few weeks/months to adjust to new conditions) and yet what we do know about pro players is that even small changes like changing the type of racquet used can take years to adapt. Novak has said that tiny changes like adding or taking a few grams off his racquet is a decision that takes a while to make.

changes like the one Roddick describes would require redoing much of his career and training. Borg famously had years to change for, his old racquets and couldn’t do it.
Borg is a terrible example considering he retired for over 8 years before the comeback and made an extremely half hearted comeback. I’m not even really going to address that one because it’s a waste of both of our time. Kimiko Date would be an obvious rebuttal as to why such a thing can be done btw. But I know you’re not interested in actually finding the truth on this, and I’m sure you’ve never even heard of Kimiko Date.
 

Alcawrath

Semi-Pro
Its usually the shills like Roddick and other tennis media that are literally paid / in their interest to hype the game.
:-D who's paying Roddick to hype the game? Judging by TTW reactions he'd be far better off criticizing the current players. Just watch any retired NBA player commentator and you'll see it's far more common for old heads to imagine it was tougher back in the day.

Also, listen to his podcast in it's entirety. He says that Fed, Rafa, and Djoko would be just fine in the current field because they can move at an elite level. He was questioning the success of less complete players like himself in the current era.
 

GabeT

G.O.A.T.
Borg is a terrible example considering he retired for over 8 years before the comeback. I’m not even really going to address that one because it’s a waste of both of our time. Kimiko Date would be an obvious rebuttal as to why such a thing can be done btw. But I know you’re not interested in actually finding the truth on this, and I’m sure you’ve never even heard of Kimiko Date.
I’ve no idea what you think you “rebutted”. You have tendency to make all kinds of declarations that have little bearing with reality. And they tend to show in those few circumstances when you actually try to predict real matches and outcomes.

It’s a fact that players, once they grow up under certain circumstances, find it very hard to change how they play or train or the tech they use. This was true for Borg but also for Federer (who many posters here claim should have changed the size of his racquet long before he did) Novak and DelPo (who at one point had only two racquets to play with because he couldn’t find the exact model he was used to). And that’s just off the top of my head, I’m sure there’s loads more

So the idea that a time traveling Roddick would simply need a few months to change the tech he played with and the training and would simply adapt is ludicrous
 

MeatTornado

Talk Tennis Guru
I think people misread this on Roddick's end it takes a lot self-confidence to be so publicly self deprecating and he's usually doing it for the sake of humor. I'm sure Roddick is a confident guy that is tremendously proud of what he achieved and knows that he had a hall of fame career and was an amazing player.
It's definitely for humor, but it's also gotten so consistent that I think he's actually started to believe it. I will say the confidence does come out when he's talking to/about fans or other media members, he'll definitely play the "I was #1, I know what I'm talking about" card. But when talking to or about other players he immediately acts like an idiot who doesn't know anything.

This is also the same guy that threw out all his trophies besides his US Open, so I don't know how proud he really is about what he achieved. Whenever talking about his career he seems pretty defined as someone who didn't win the things he wanted to.
 

Kralingen

Bionic Poster
I’ve no idea what you think you “rebutted”. You have tendency to make all kinds of declarations that have little bearing with reality. And they tend to show in those few circumstances when you actually try to predict real matches and outcomes.

It’s a fact that players, once they grow up under certain circumstances, find it very hard to change how they play or train or the tech they use. This was true for Borg but also for Federer (who many posters here claim should have changed the size of his racquet long before he did) Novak and DelPo (who at one point had only two racquets to play with because he couldn’t find the exact model he was used to). And that’s just off the top of my head, I’m sure there’s loads more

So the idea that a time traveling Roddick would simply need a few months to change the tech he played with and the training and would simply adapt is ludicrous
I’ll wait for you to google Kimiko Date, wait a bit longer for you to skim her Wikipedia page, then we can have a conversation
 

weakera

Talk Tennis Guru
I do wonder if he'd still be the same guy today anyway, or if he'd have an unbearable ego if he'd won Wimbledon 2-3 times.

He'd be a totally different person. That interview he does with Roger (I think there's only one like this, in-studio) is embarrassing. He's mentally neutered.
 

MeatTornado

Talk Tennis Guru
He'd be a totally different person. That interview he does with Roger (I think there's only one like this, in-studio) is embarrassing. He's mentally neutered.
I only wonder if he'd still have a big inferiority complex from still not living up to the previous American standard, particularly after Pete raised the bar so high.
 

weakera

Talk Tennis Guru
I only wonder if he'd still have a big inferiority complex from still not living up to the previous American standard, particularly after Pete raised the bar so high.

Given where tennis then headed I don't think it's fair to hold Roddick to that standard, I really think all he needed was that 09 Wimbledon to die happy.
 

GabeT

G.O.A.T.
I’ll wait for you to google Kimiko Date, wait a bit longer for you to skim her Wikipedia page, then we can have a conversation
You think that by repeating the same nonsense over and over you’ve made a point?

Forget about me and what I think. Listen to the pros. They are telling me you that no, major changes in training and tech is not something you simply need a few months to adapt to. Much much smaller changes can require years.

And we need to add that even if they “adapted”, meaning they felt comfortable playing in the new conditions, it doesn’t mean they would do as well as they did under the old conditions. Even for the Big 3, who are probably the three best players in the history of the sport, we know that while they played if you changed even conditions they were used to (surface, heat, humidity, indoor vs outdoor) it would have a huge impact on their chances

The reality is that players that do well do so because they found conditions that suited them. There is no certainty that they would do equally well under new circumstances. If all the surfaces were clay or like the AO or grass there probably wouldn’t even be a Big 3
 

TheFifthSet

Legend
It’s really tiresome to have these same convos over and over again with most-everyone talking past each other. So I’ll just link my favourite post on this broader topic, by @Kralingen:

I'm sitting in my car in the Wake Forest football stadium parking lot, waiting for the rain to stop, because I stupidly bought Winston-Salem 250 tickets for the one night in the entire North Carolinian summer when it decides to rain.

I swear if Coric plays like a mug when this rain finally stops I'm going to lose it. I'll give this a shot.

OK, so obviously Tsitsipas is not even close to a flawless player or someone who can be consistently relied upon to beat most players even in 2023 imo. His high spin-rate poly style (like Thiem's) may have some rare benefits when it's on, but his BH also has some clear drawbacks, especially on return. He has to rely on timing his strokes perfectly to avoid shanks and loopy shots, and concedes court positioning as a result, when he plays closer to the baseline, he can be rushed quite easily off both wings.

And the way that Novak so summarily demolishes him even now does not bode well for his prospects a decade ago. Even Murray, who literally has a metal hip that severely impacts his movement and ability to rotate into shots, is able to push him to the absolute limit. It is stupefying to suggest that Stefanos is ever going to be the undisputed best player in the world in really any scenario, to me.

What I think is more likely, though, is that using a time machine, Tsitsipas may initially beat some of the guys from 03 who hadn't seen his style before, but as with anything, they would adapt, figure out his weaknesses, use some of his techniques, and eventually usurp him and beat him regularly.

I generally think that sports, and athletics in general, are incredibly reactive pursuits. And reactivity is really how the game evolves. Someone starts doing something new, the opponents have to catch up, the level raises. And specifically in tennis, technology (both strings, racquets, surfaces, shoes, and general nutrition/training) causes new variables in the game forcing players to react. So this is why you might say on an absolute level 2023's top players are the best ever (I disagree, I don't think they're much better than 15 years ago - maybe 25 to 30 years ago, but that is mainly technology)

To make this short. You can draw such an obvious through-line for each level of player throughout history that I think much of this is just about the circumstances players have imposed on them. I don't truly believe any top players are that much better than others, just subject to different circumstances. Tilden beat Budge, who beat Gonzales, who beat Laver, who beat Borg, who beat Lendl, who beat Sampras and Agassi, who beat Federer, who beat Djokovic, who is now beating Alcaraz. Albert Pujols just hit 30 home runs at nearly age 45. LeBron James who played against Gary Payton and Karl ****ing Malone is still the best player on the floor in certain playoff games vs. Jokic, Tatum, Anthony Edwards, etc.

I think that 2023 players are allowed to do things that were not possible 20 years ago. For example Lleyton Hewitt played in 03 but he didn't slide on HCs and also wasn't using poly back then. However, even after suffering serious hip injuries, Hewitt was still out moving top players in the early 2010s, Federer among them. So it suggests to me that these players are not better movers, they specifically train to slide and play on surfaces and with shoes deliberately engineered for that exact purpose. And we saw old guys like Hewitt in 2013 upset prime “evolved” Del Potro in Flushing using this new movement principle even if it wasn’t a staple of his 00-05 movement.

It’s like Jason Kidd learning to become an elite 3 point shooter at the end of his career, and taking down the Heatles in 2011 despite being well past his best. Not going to ding guys for not emphasizing things that were either not possible or not practiced when they played. The other thing is, Tim Duncan could absolutely shut down Simmons in 2003... He was able to protect the rim at an elite level even with no hips and knees in 2014 against LeBron freaking James.

Fair and sober-minded take. I’ll co-sign what’s in it. Saves me the essay, and don’t really want to engage with Roddick’s performative humility.
 
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SonnyT

Legend
Andy Roddick has exposed himself for being a puppet of the media.

They obviously think that we don't pay attention to the facts.

Because the last time that I checked, Roddick had a 5-4 record against Novak Djokovic.

The same guy that has been kicking the Next Gen's a** for the past 10 years.

So yes Andy, you would have a chance to win a slam in this era.

Even though you're just a paid shill, these days.

It's too bad that you didn't make enough money during your pro career.

I guess you'll have to spend your retirement shilling for the media and making embarrassing videos like the one that you made here.
Roddick wouldn't have any chances against Alcaraz or Sinner, just like he had no chance against Federer.

The last time Roddick defeated Djokovic was 2010. Djokovic really started dominating in '11.
 

Terenigma

G.O.A.T.
Roddick stating he couldn't beat the top players could apply to literally any generation of tennis. I like the guy but... yeah... Let's not get ahead of ourselves.
 

TheFifthSet

Legend
For every Andy Roddick there is a Nikolay Daveydenko, Juan Martin Del Potro, Toni Nadal, and even Rafael Nadal who say the opposite. If we’re going to listen to pros we should listen to more than one voice, no?

Yeah, there’s the rub: you very frequently have two separate pros with diametrically opposed views on the same subject. What then? Strident agnosticism is the only option here?
 
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