Role of an awl

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by Jster, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. Jster

    Jster Rookie

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    Can anyone explain to me the role of the awl in tying off a knot in the video?
    Interested to know, whether it is relevant or not.



    Thanks.
     
    #1
  2. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    The friction of the awl against the string keep tension between the grommet and machine clamp. Also when tying off some time the string will cross over the anchor string, the awl keeps the string in place. I use a wood toothpick works just a good and will not nick string like an awl will.
     
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  3. brooker

    brooker Rookie

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    The stringer pulled the tie-off string manually and then jammed the tie-off string with the anchor string by inserting the awl into the hole. It will lock the tie-off string in the tight place before he ties the knot. I think it is
    similar to use a cam action piler to tighten the tie-off string before tying the knot
     
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  4. CosmosMpower

    CosmosMpower Semi-Pro

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    Just helps keep tension on the string on the outside of the frame so it's not all floppy. I started doing this.
     
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  5. chrisingrassia

    chrisingrassia Professional

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    WTF. Was this guy pulling the tie-off string with tweezers?!?!
    I gotta say, all these needless tools coming into play just to tie off the friggin' knot. Jamming an awl in the grommet hole to "hold" tension is a bad idea IMO, you're crushing the string(s) to create that friction. The top and bottom cross are irrelevant strings to the stringbed, I'm convinced mftr's incorporate them just so there's two useless tie-off Xs. Add a bit of extra tension, tie it off, go play.

    OP -- I use the awl on every racquet with shared grommets to hold the first string in the right place when I pull tension. That's about all I use it for.

    Tweezers.....heh.....

    "No crossovers allowed".....heh.....
     
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  6. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    @chrisingrassis I doubt the awl will hold tension on a string but the sharp point could easily cut the string. Too bad the stringer was not explaining (in English) why he does what he does, but I think a lot of the reason is to hold the string in place to prevent crossover outside the frame. A toothpick does that without the chance of nicking the string. BTW I don't think it tweezers he's using I think it pliers (Ouch!)
     
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  7. CosmosMpower

    CosmosMpower Semi-Pro

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    I think the grommet would collapse before an awl would crush 1.30mm poly that I use. Maybe if you use thin gauge delicate NG but I've not had any issues. And when I say 'Jam' I insert it pretty slowly and just make sure there's tension on the string in the hole.
     
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  8. chrisingrassia

    chrisingrassia Professional

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    I say "crush" loosely. That's what he's using the awl for is to "hold" tension, but that's really not a good idea. All sorts of bad effects could come from it.
     
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  9. ElMagoElGato

    ElMagoElGato Rookie

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    I used to use an awl almost in the same way as the video but now practicing "rocking motion" because the awl didn't hold on some rackets. Probably the material of the grommet was slippery.

    I prefer using an awl to rocking motion. Rocking motion takes much harder work and only results as same or just close. Also, it increases risk to damage a string and ultimately yourself. It always gives you a good and consistent result using an awl.
     
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  10. Tennis_Monk

    Tennis_Monk Hall of Fame

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    I am using awl to get the strings through shared holes when things are tight. Is that not the right usage?
     
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  11. brooker

    brooker Rookie

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    Lubricate the awl before inserting it into the grommet , and do this carefully and gently. It should be fine.

    See this example by drakulie. He deminstrated how to do it right.

     
    #11
  12. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I think it is probably more the string than the grommet. When I push a half toothpick in I usually hammer it in with the flat surface of the awl. If it is not in tight the string will pop it out when you quit pulling on some strings as it tends to relax and pull out.
     
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  13. ElMagoElGato

    ElMagoElGato Rookie

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    I thought I used a toothpick before and failed. But I tried putting it in on a strung racket now and looked good. I'll try this method next time around.
     
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  14. CosmosMpower

    CosmosMpower Semi-Pro

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    I found with thick/stiff polys the rocking motion does not get all the slack out of the outside of the frame but the awl does.
     
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  15. ElMagoElGato

    ElMagoElGato Rookie

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    That's true. Besides, tying off is a lot easier with an awl.
     
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  16. lidoazndiabloboi

    lidoazndiabloboi Professional

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    Wow he really jammed it in hard. I'm going to give him the benefit of the doubt as he is a pro tournament stringer for Yonex, most recently at the 2017 AO. I also come to know a few Japanese stringers and they are very knowledgeable at there craft. There are many ways to string rackets, and as long as the results are good, then there's no problem.
     
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