Rule clarification: I hit my partner with my first serve

Correct me if I'm wrong please. Serving on the ad side in a doubles match, my first serve nailed my partner in the ear ~ I was totally embarrassed and apologized the rest of the night. Anyways, the opposing team tried to claim a point. Since the ball did not clear the net before striking my opponent I say it was a fault just as I hit the ball into the net. After my partner recovered and was back on his feet, it is my second serve. Was I wrong?
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
I think to lose the point you have to be hit by a ball that is in play. Say a point is in progress, and the ball rebounds off of the side wall and strikes me. I don't lose the point because the point ended when it hit a permanent fixture, before it hit me. Since the serve didn't cross the net and land in the correct service box, the point never started and it is a fault, not loss of point.

Now, I have also heard some people say that if the serve hits the net and then strikes the receiver's partner before the bounce the receiving team loses the point. I believe that is incorrect, but some people will try to take that point. My understanding is that once the ball strikes the net, there is no live point possible regardless of where it lands, so no loss of point. I believe it would be a first serve regardless of where the receiver's partner was standing because there is no way to know where it would have landed had it not struck the receiver's partner, so it cannot be called a fault.

Is that right?
 

kevrol

Hall of Fame
Now, I have also heard some people say that if the serve hits the net and then strikes the receiver's partner before the bounce the receiving team loses the point. I believe that is incorrect, but some people will try to take that point. My understanding is that once the ball strikes the net, there is no live point possible regardless of where it lands, so no loss of point. I believe it would be a first serve regardless of where the receiver's partner was standing because there is no way to know where it would have landed had it not struck the receiver's partner, so it cannot be called a fault.

Is that right?
It would be a 1st serve if it occured on a 1st serve. 2nd serve if on a 2nd serve. I believe.
 

blablavla

Legend
I think to lose the point you have to be hit by a ball that is in play. Say a point is in progress, and the ball rebounds off of the side wall and strikes me. I don't lose the point because the point ended when it hit a permanent fixture, before it hit me. Since the serve didn't cross the net and land in the correct service box, the point never started and it is a fault, not loss of point.

Now, I have also heard some people say that if the serve hits the net and then strikes the receiver's partner before the bounce the receiving team loses the point. I believe that is incorrect, but some people will try to take that point. My understanding is that once the ball strikes the net, there is no live point possible regardless of where it lands, so no loss of point. I believe it would be a first serve regardless of where the receiver's partner was standing because there is no way to know where it would have landed had it not struck the receiver's partner, so it cannot be called a fault.

Is that right?
I think if the receiver player / team touches the ball on service before the ball touches the ground -> they lose the point, even if it happened on 1st serve
 
Now, I have also heard some people say that if the serve hits the net and then strikes the receiver's partner before the bounce the receiving team loses the point. I believe that is incorrect, but some people will try to take that point.
Is that right?
In another thread it was said: If the ball hits the net and then touches an opposing player, regardless whether it is first or second serve and whether it would go out or not, it is a let. The server gets another serve. If the ball touches the opposing player's clothing, body or racquet without hitting the net first, regardless of the trajectory, it is a point for the serving team if the touch occurs before the bounce.
 

badmice2

Semi-Pro
The ball hit your partner and didnt cross the net, point is dead and should be a second serve - that's it.

Only time you win the point by hitting someone off a serve is if the ball crosses the net and hits the opposing player(s) prior to the ball touching the ground - the ball does not have to be in, and if doubles it can be any player.
 

Flootoo

Rookie
Now, I have also heard some people say that if the serve hits the net and then strikes the receiver's partner before the bounce the receiving team loses the point. I believe that is incorrect, but some people will try to take that point. My understanding is that once the ball strikes the net, there is no live point possible regardless of where it lands, so no loss of point. I believe it would be a first serve regardless of where the receiver's partner was standing because there is no way to know where it would have landed had it not struck the receiver's partner, so it cannot be called a fault.

Is that right?
I'd say if it hits the net, then hits the receiver's partner, it has gone so far off target that it can only be called a fault. How close to the T is the receiver's partner?
 

McLovin

Legend
I'd say if it hits the net, then hits the receiver's partner, it has gone so far off target that it can only be called a fault. How close to the T is the receiver's partner?
Doesn't matter, if the opponent interferes w/ the serve after it hits the net, its a let. The thought process is you don't know if a huge gust of wind might come by and blow the ball back into the service box, and by making contact with the ball, your opponent has removed that possibility.

Also, consider the alternative: Doubles match point against the sever. Second serve hits the net & pops up. The receiver's partner leans into the box & lets the ball land on him/her before it lands in. By your rule, its a fault. Match over.
 
Last edited:

Flootoo

Rookie
Doesn't matter, if the opponent interferes w/ the serve after it hits the net, its a let. The thought process is you don't know if a huge gust of wind might come by and blow the ball back into the service box, and by making contact with the ball, your opponent has removed that possibility.

Also, consider the alternative: Doubles match point against the sever. Second serve hits the net & pops up. The receiver's partner leans into the box & lets the ball land on him/her before it lands in. By your rule, its a fault. Match over.
So a ball that was meant to be going cross-court, ends up going down the line instead, and instead of landing inside the service box, is so off-target that it hits a person standing up at the edge?
And a monstrous freak gust of wind could have blown up out of nowhere and back on target?
The first part of this story is bad enough, but the second part is pure fantasy.

As for the second scenario, where Mr Fantastic has to resort to such cheap tricks to win a match....
 

McLovin

Legend
So a ball that was meant to be going cross-court, ends up going down the line instead, and instead of landing inside the service box, is so off-target that it hits a person standing up at the edge?
And a monstrous freak gust of wind could have blown up out of nowhere and back on target?
The first part of this story is bad enough, but the second part is pure fantasy.
But you're missing the point: In sports the rules cannot be subjective. You cannot question 'well, was the ball going to land in or wasn't it?', because now you're opening it up to the interpretation of the umpire.

It is entirely possible that a serve can clip the net, pop up in the air, and under normal circumstances, land 1ft wide of the center line. But, on an extremely windy day (and I will direct you to last year's semi at the French between Djokovic and Theim, or the 2004 US between Federer and Agassi), that floater *could* be pushed back into the service box. But if the receivers partner interferes with it, you'll never know.

What is your thought on the rule that if a player gets hit by an overhead when they're 10 ft behind the baseline, they lose the point? The shot was clearly not going in.
 
Last edited:

Flootoo

Rookie
But you're missing the point: In sports the rules cannot be subjective. You cannot question 'well, was the ball going to land in or wasn't it?', because now you're opening it up to the interpretation of the umpire.

It is entirely possible that a serve can clip the net, pop up in the air, and under normal circumstances, land 1ft wide of the center line. But, on an extremely windy day (and I will direct you to last year's semi at the French between Djokovic and Theim, or the 2004 US between Federer and Agassi), that floater *could* be pushed back into the service box. But if the receivers partner interferes with it, you'll never know.

What is your thought on the rule that if a player gets hit by an overhead when they're 10 ft behind the baseline, they lose the point? The shot was clearly not going in.
Yeah I know you're right, I just thought it was funny to imagine that scenario.
I wish I was focused and athletic enough to dodge/catch ANY ball, let alone one that changed direction suddenly. Most days, I'm content with returning two shots in a row.
 

time_fly

Hall of Fame
Somewhat related: my opponent hit his first serve on the fly straight at my face last night. I was the receiver, not the net guy. Without thinking, I caught it. His point ...
 

zaskar1

Semi-Pro
Correct me if I'm wrong please. Serving on the ad side in a doubles match, my first serve nailed my partner in the ear ~ I was totally embarrassed and apologized the rest of the night. Anyways, the opposing team tried to claim a point. Since the ball did not clear the net before striking my opponent I say it was a fault just as I hit the ball into the net. After my partner recovered and was back on his feet, it is my second serve. Was I wrong?
its just a fault, but i think your partner wont play up if it happens again
dont feel bad, i think all of us have done this
z
 
Top