Rules question?

kevhen

Hall of Fame
During a doubles match, I hit a dropshot, that with the wind, bounced back over to our side of the court. The opponent ran to it and reached over the net, but stopped his swing because he might have hit my partner who was very close to the ball. Does the opposing team have the right to call a hindrance on my partner or does my partner have the right to stand anywhere on our side of the court? We took the point since it was a friendly match but I have never seen this situation before.
 

kevhen

Hall of Fame
Ball bouncing back over

A player is allowed to hit the ball on the opposing side if a ball bounces back over to it. An opponent can even technically run around the net to hit the ball but can not stand inside the lines on your side.

My partner didn't try to distract him but I think was trying to stay close to the ball in case the opponent was able to make contact with it.

It's been awhile since I have hit a shot that has come back over to my side without the opponents hitting it. I used to do this about once a year but has been maybe 3 years since the last time in match play. I think in this case I was on the defense and just trying to keep the ball in play, as I would normally never or rarely would hit a dropshot when playing doubles.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Your point since the guy did not hit it. During a match though, your partner probably would have been hit by the ball or by the racquet of your opponent (hinderance) and your team would have loss the point.

Bag: Your note is not correct. He can reach over and strike the ball if it spins back over the net after coming over the net. He just cannot touch the net.
 

kevhen

Hall of Fame
So if the ball bounces back over and hits my partner before the opponent hits the ball or the ball hits the court, it would be the opponents point? I think I can agree with that. Or least that would definitely be a hinder.
 

kevhen

Hall of Fame
So what if the opponent had swung at the ball and hit my partner? Would that have been a hinder on my partner?
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Yes. OTW, he would have hit the ball. Your partner is not part of the court and anything he does such as hindering the stroke that your opponent can hit by reaching over is illegal and should be called. In match play, I have seen people injured by a swinging racquet because they were too close to the ball.
 

kevhen

Hall of Fame
So we should have played a let as the opponent did ask for a hindrance but since the ball was on our side I thought my partner had a right to stand anywhere on our side of the court. Luckily it was a friendly match!
 

Roy125

Professional
^^^
Wait what? I was under the impression that I can stand anywhere I want to on my side of the court (even if it was in front of the ball). I don't understand how it's a hindrance if I'm just standing there.
 

papa

Hall of Fame
^^^
Wait what? I was under the impression that I can stand anywhere I want to on my side of the court (even if it was in front of the ball). I don't understand how it's a hindrance if I'm just standing there.
Because you have to give way/room for the opponent to hit the ball and you cannot get in their way even if its on your side of the net, as it is in this instance. So, you cannot stand anywhere you like ALL the time - there are other instances where you can create a hindrance also.
 
W

woodrow1029

Guest
My opinion is that if he hit your partner and your partner was there in a normal position and not moving there with the intent to hinder, then it's bad luck. Your partner can be anywhere. I asked one of my friends, a top ITF chair umpire, who also concurs.

If its a friendly match, of course another option is to replay the point if everyone is happy with that. But I don't see any way I would call a hindrance loss of point unless he like three his body or racket deliberately in the opponents way to clearly get in his way of making the shot.

Since he stopped his swing and made no attempt at the ball, then I feel that he has lost his option to ask for a let at all and loses the point.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Saw on TC a point where they show the guy reaching over the net on a back bouncing ball, and just calmly tap it into the net from the other side to end the point.

Now, if by mistake, he had hit back to his own side of the court, does the point continue and is his partner obliged to return the ball, or does the team lose the point for not hitting the ball to the other side (in the usual sense) of the court? I think the latter.
 

papa

Hall of Fame
My opinion is that if he hit your partner and your partner was there in a normal position and not moving there with the intent to hinder, then it's bad luck. Your partner can be anywhere. I asked one of my friends, a top ITF chair umpire, who also concurs.

If its a friendly match, of course another option is to replay the point if everyone is happy with that. But I don't see any way I would call a hindrance loss of point unless he like three his body or racket deliberately in the opponents way to clearly get in his way of making the shot.

Since he stopped his swing and made no attempt at the ball, then I feel that he has lost his option to ask for a let at all and loses the point.
Your opinion might very well be correct but I was under the impression that there are factors to be considered here. However, I am NOT an official as most realize and I might have this incorrect.

I believe that "intent" would be a primary factor here with whether its a let or point awarded because of a hindrance. Preventing a player (opponent) from playing a ball by "intentionally" staying/repositioning themselves so that the opponent cannot get to or play the ball seems to fit into one category. If its "unintentional", I believe it falls into the "let" category and the point should be replayed.

I have seen both situations many times and realize there has to be a judgement made regarding intent. However, I'm not of the opinion that one can just claim they were already positioned and therefore don't have to move. I would think this "somewhat" similar to baseball (at least in some way) to the batter not making any attempt to get out of the way of a pitched ball and thinking they should be awarded first base.

Also, it would seem to me that just because the opponent didn't complete his swing would have little to no bearing on this. For instance if a ball was hit in a manner (like a drop shot or point being discussed) that the opponent felt he was either going to injure (the opposing player) or not be able to make his shot primarily because of the opponents deliberate position, I would think this a hindrance but intent would have to be determined.

Now, the bottom line might very well be that we're both saying the same thing and on any specific instance, we might see it the same way. However, I am NOT schooled/trained specifically in this area. Interesting discussion.
 

goran_ace

Hall of Fame
Now, if by mistake, he had hit back to his own side of the court, does the point continue and is his partner obliged to return the ball, or does the team lose the point for not hitting the ball to the other side (in the usual sense) of the court? I think the latter.
Loses the point. The ball is no longer in play.
 

papa

Hall of Fame
Loses the point. The ball is no longer in play.
Yes, your correct, the ball would have been hit twice by the same same player(s) so the instant the ball touches the point is over. In certain areas wind along with spin can play a significant factor in balls that bounce on the right side and without being touched, end up coming back over the net.

I suppose the exception to this would be if the opponent touches the net prior to the bounce - never have seen this but its possible.
 

mucat

Hall of Fame
I think the opponents has the right to call hindrance on this and you and your partner should lose the point without replay.

1) The opponent cannot really make an attempt without potentially hitting your partner with the racket. So it is reasonable they didn't try to hit the ball.

2) Since they are in position to hit the ball, and it will be a winner, there should be no replay.
 
Saw on TC a point where they show the guy reaching over the net on a back bouncing ball, and just calmly tap it into the net from the other side to end the point.

Now, if by mistake, he had hit back to his own side of the court, does the point continue and is his partner obliged to return the ball, or does the team lose the point for not hitting the ball to the other side (in the usual sense) of the court? I think the latter.
Reminded me of this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNHxaJzUA88
 
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