Sam Groth's opinion on western forehand grips

StringSnapper

Hall of Fame
Wow, that guy is a blimp now!
He was always a massive unit - more of an endomorph naturally I think. Its interesting that he chose tennis as his sport with that body type, it seems tennis is more suited to meso / ectomorphs due to the speed required, most players just get the power from being tall / long limbs / timing
 

tonylg

Legend
He was always a massive unit - more of an endomorph naturally I think. Its interesting that he chose tennis as his sport with that body type, it seems tennis is more suited to meso / ectomorphs due to the speed required, most players just get the power from being tall / long limbs / timing
He is actually a very good Australian Rules Football player.
 

Dan R

Professional
He is actually a very good Australian Rules Football player.
I don't doubt that. I bet he'd be a hell of a linebacker in American Football (or maybe a tight end but he's just a bit small for that position as crazy as that seems).
 

FatHead250

Professional
couldn't find where groth disparaged western grip...
but at 6'4" western probably doesn't make sense...
he probably hasn't had to hit a ball that was over his head since he was 10y old :p
He has a forehand dominant game but he says he hits his backhand better and dislikes his forehand. Typical problem of a western-grip player. They can dominate the playing patterns with their western grip but its so unenjoayble to hit that they hate it. Western Grip isnt for hitting the ball over the head, it's for dominating neutral pace balls. Unfortunately, it becomes utter loopy garbage under high pace and is unenjoable to hit
 

nyta2

Professional
Western grips is the worst grip to have and is what holding many players like Kyrgios and Sock down
if getting to top 10 is considered "held back", i might switch to western :p
He has a forehand dominant game but he says he hits his backhand better and dislikes his forehand. Typical problem of a western-grip player. They can dominate the playing patterns with their western grip but its so unenjoayble to hit that they hate it. Western Grip isnt for hitting the ball over the head, it's for dominating neutral pace balls. Unfortunately, it becomes utter loopy garbage under high pace and is unenjoable to hit
i actually made the switch from near-hawaiian (just past western (almost continental!)) a long time ago... for me was definitely too loopy (never figured out how to flatten it out like sock or nk can, and not as fun to hit as i can now with sw
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
but at 6'4" western probably doesn't make sense...
he probably hasn't had to hit a ball that was over his head since he was 10y old :p
As a rule you don't find many Australian players with western grips, at any level. We grow up mostly on fast, low-bouncing courts - historically grass, more recently synthetic grass.

They've tried to change that a bit over the years, but there's still not a ton of hardcourt around and clay courts remain mostly expensive luxuries.
 

HuusHould

Professional
As a rule you don't find many Australian players with western grips, at any level.
The Aussie professional closest to a full Western, in my recent memory, was Peter Luczak. The full Western is rare for players of any nationality though, with the possible exception of some of the countries renowned for producing claycourt specialists. Maybe you're including semi western as a Western grip? But I'd say the majority of Australian male pros at the moment would use a semi western.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
There are some moderately extreme SW grips out there that seem to work for some. But aside from Nishikori, Kyrgios, Sock and, perhaps, some clay court specialists, not gonna see anything close to a full W grip from the top guys.
 

sredna42

Hall of Fame
What was Hewitt's grip? I thought it was western, or getting there, and he did alright with it, and hit mostly flat too as my coach pointed out.
 

sredna42

Hall of Fame
I sat front row looking right down the T of a lesson he got from match he played with Federer and can tell you that serve was just frightening.
Yeah, I watched him practicing serves from only a few metres away on outside courts at the AO, and the sound when he hit the ball was mental, every bit of his weight he puts through the ball, TV didn't do him justice, he must have been the most solid player on the Atp by far
 

Keendog

Professional
He was always a massive unit - more of an endomorph naturally I think. Its interesting that he chose tennis as his sport with that body type, it seems tennis is more suited to meso / ectomorphs due to the speed required, most players just get the power from being tall / long limbs / timing
You've been watching too much ghostbusters
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
@Shroud
Thomas Muster had an awesome full western forehand.
Muster was a prime example of a clay court specialist that I had mentioned. Never made it past 1R at Wimbledon (but did manage to make the QF round at USO a couple of times). Losing record on grass (7-10) but did win abt 2/3 of his HC matches (144-80). However, he played quite a bit more on clay than he did on HC. And he garnered a win rate of better than 77% on the clay (426-127).
 

tlm

G.O.A.T.
He has a forehand dominant game but he says he hits his backhand better and dislikes his forehand. Typical problem of a western-grip player. They can dominate the playing patterns with their western grip but its so unenjoayble to hit that they hate it. Western Grip isnt for hitting the ball over the head, it's for dominating neutral pace balls. Unfortunately, it becomes utter loopy garbage under high pace and is unenjoable to hit
I use a strong western grip and sometimes Hawaiin and I hit the best with those grips. Will use SW also at times but love the control that a western gives and I have learned how to flatten shots out even with a Hawaiian grip.
It’s probably because of my weird mechanics that I need to use a grip like that, but I have experimented a lot with different grips and western is the way to go for me.
 

HuusHould

Professional
I sat front row looking right down the T of a lesson he got from match he played with Federer and can tell you that serve was just frightening.
Come on, he took a set off him! But the end result was never really in doubt. Ahh that was of course the US Open as opposed to Wimby? He was up a break in at least one set though. An erratic ball toss held it back from being one of the great serves I'd say.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
@Shroud

Muster was a prime example of a clay court specialist that I had mentioned. Never made it past 1R at Wimbledon (but did manage to make the QF round at USO a couple of times). Losing record on grass (7-10) but did win abt 2/3 of his HC matches (144-80). However, he played quite a bit more on clay than he did on HC. And he garnered a win rate of better than 77% on the clay (426-127).
That was when the courts were different and faster. He would be top ten in todays slow court baseline tour
 

Clay lover

Hall of Fame
I tend to avoid these blanket statements like the plague. Full western is not advised for the general tennis population, sure. But different people have different body configurations and it's bound to work for some. Also wouldn't pros be terrible examples to prove this case as I would argue the western grip presence among pros is *higher* than that among amateurs. As for results a win is a win regardless of the surface so I don't know why clay court specialism is even held against westerners - at least it earned them slams. Courier, Bruguera, Berasategui, Moya, Andreev...have used the Western grip just fine on clay.

Even on hard you have someone like Hewitt and Nishi. Djoko and Cilic may not be fully western but their in-between grips still go against the gross generalisation that extreme = undesirable on fast courts.
 
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