Saving deep lobs: I reach the ball, then?

ChimpChimp

Semi-Pro
Chasing from the net, I can often reach the ball, then don't know how to hit with this side stance. Always hit the ball wide to the net post. It is so even when I have enough time to step firm the last step, bend the knees, transfer weight to the opponent's side when hitting. But surely insufficient time to position myself like a regular groundstroke, otherwise it is a groundstroke.

Don't run straightly to the ball -- I remember this. I run to beside the ball, as in this illustration -- running direction, ball a bit beyond right shoulder, body direction, ball flight direction.

Suggestions?
  1. Cut the time of stepping firm, so as to run two steps further back, so that the stance is more like the usual groundstroke? But when hitting my body is moving away from the ball.
  2. Buggy whip?
  3. Practise by rallying groundstroke with this stance (mimic relative positions, without the running part)?
  4. Don't want to learn under crotch.
 

golden chicken

Hall of Fame
Ideally, #1, but not with your body still moving away from the net. That means you have to run harder sooner and for longer so you beat the ball to the spot where you can hit it in front of you more--more in line with your left shoulder.
 

ubercat

Professional
Practice dropping back with one foot to get side on and then doing a long crossover step to gain that first metre quickly.
 

gallen1999

Rookie
On really deep lobs the only thing you can hit are tweeners or this shot

If I can reach it before it drops below my waist, I usually just lob it back.


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S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Chasing from the net, I can often reach the ball, then don't know how to hit with this side stance. Always hit the ball wide to the net post. It is so even when I have enough time to step firm the last step, bend the knees, transfer weight to the opponent's side when hitting. But surely insufficient time to position myself like a regular groundstroke, otherwise it is a groundstroke.

Don't run straightly to the ball -- I remember this. I run to beside the ball, as in this illustration -- running direction, ball a bit beyond right shoulder, body direction, ball flight direction.

Suggestions?
  1. Cut the time of stepping firm, so as to run two steps further back, so that the stance is more like the usual groundstroke? But when hitting my body is moving away from the ball.
  2. Buggy whip?
  3. Practise by rallying groundstroke with this stance (mimic relative positions, without the running part)?
  4. Don't want to learn under crotch.
So let me see if I've got this right: assuming you're a righty, you are running away from the net and towards the back fence. You hit a FH over your shoulder but it angles off towards your Deuce court and outside the net post.

Usually when this happens to me, I was not able to fully catch up with the ball and I was trying to hit back into the court and I just wasn't able to compensate for the bad angle.

- Can you do it standing still? Do some drop feeds simulating the real thing but keep stationary so you can figure out your swing mechanics. Try to overcompensate by hitting wide in the opposite direction [towards your Ad]. Now that you've established a range, try to meet somewhere in the middle.

- Add some motion: start halfway between the SL and BL and toss the ball out towards the back fence. Do so close enough that you only have to run at half speed. Can you still hit out towards the Ad?

- You may also try adjusting your grip. Assuming you're in a Continental, shift halfway to Eastern FH: that will make the racquet face more or less align with the palm of your hand.

- Even more radical is to switch fully to Eastern FH but use the opposite face. Sounds awkward but try it and you'll notice how easy it is to hit back towards your Ad court.
 

ChimpChimp

Semi-Pro
So let me see if I've got this right: assuming you're a righty, you are running away from the net and towards the back fence. You hit a FH over your shoulder but it angles off towards your Deuce court and outside the net post.
Exactly.

- Even more radical is to switch fully to Eastern FH but use the opposite face. Sounds awkward but try it and you'll notice how easy it is to hit back towards your Ad court.
Do you mean the one-handed backhand grip? Fun, I also thought about this after posting. With this grip, with the same body orientation as in the illustration, the racquet faces less to the side, more to the center of the court.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Do you mean the one-handed backhand grip? Fun, I also thought about this after posting. With this grip, with the same body orientation as in the illustration, the racquet faces less to the side, more to the center of the court.
I have a 2HBH so I don't know what a 1HBH grip is except for slice, which is Continental.

I mean an Eastern FH. Normally you hit with the side facing away from your palm. What I'm suggesting for your particular situation is to use the other face because it's pointed more towards the Ad court.
 

Wander

Hall of Fame
I honestly think you just have to practice doing the shot repeatedly until you figure a way to get it consistently back in play. You can't learn it in match play cause it's a relatively rare shot.
 

Off The Wall

Semi-Pro
I am already returning a high ball, but the angle is bad, and depth is also bad.
Your OP described you as trying to hit a forehand stroke. I'm saying: don't. The ball is high, hit it high back. The angle is bad because you are trying to hit a full swing shot. The depth is bad because you are trying to hit a stroke while off balance. Just lob it back. As you play better people, they will follow their lobs to the net and be there for your forehand from behind the baseline.
 

ChimpChimp

Semi-Pro
Your OP described you as trying to hit a forehand stroke. I'm saying: don't. The ball is high, hit it high back. The angle is bad because you are trying to hit a full swing shot. The depth is bad because you are trying to hit a stroke while off balance. Just lob it back. As you play better people, they will follow their lobs to the net and be there for your forehand from behind the baseline.
Sorry I described badly. By high ball I mean I am already trying to return a lob. The contact point is at eye level.
 

Dan Huben

Semi-Pro
Watching an old video of a YouTube teacher recently, he was handling deep lobs, with the same instruction as others. What I noticed what he does versus me (besides everything] is that I tend to run to wear I would catch the fly ball, and then move to adjust the fine positioning, and I run out of time and hit the ball too close and too awkward. What this guy did, and looked really exaggerated, and note he didn't talk about it, was that he ran to a place that was about a yard and 1/2 wide of where the ball was supposed to bounce. He didn't have as much motion after the bounce.

While I'm not fast, it has helped a great deal of not running to the ball but running off the ball.


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Friedman Whip

Professional
Learn the bucharest backfire. Great fun (and safe) shot to hit.
And it can be done a little differently than shown in video. If you get under the ball quick enough you can spin your body around and hit it more like a regular overhead. You can hit it right at a net man and if you can get it to just barely clear the net it still works because they're usually not expecting it and the ball has a lot of topspin and will dip down below net height to make it tough to volley.
 
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Deleted member 23235

Guest
Learn the bucharest backfire. Great fun (and safe) shot to hit.
And it can be done a little differently than shown in video. If you get under the ball quick enough you can spin your body around and hit it more like a regular overhead. You can hit it right at a net man and if you can get it to just barely clear the net it still works because they're usually not expecting it and the ball has a lot of topspin and will dip down below net height to make it tough to volley.
lol i was looking for a vid demo'ing that, thx! didn't realize that that is what it's called. will practice that tomorrow.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Just run back and hit a lob. Trying to hit a winning tweener on a deep lob is a recipe for injury. The bucharest backfire is a good choice in singles but it gets killed in doubles. Hit the lob. High and deep.
 

navigator

Hall of Fame
Just run back and hit a lob. Trying to hit a winning tweener on a deep lob is a recipe for injury. The bucharest backfire is a good choice in singles but it gets killed in doubles. Hit the lob. High and deep.
Also, more often than not, even if you hit the tweener "well"... it just goes right back to your opponent who's at the net and he bunts a volley for a winner. I can hit tweeners pretty decently, but... I can't aim them (most folks - even pros - can't - ok, meltphace can!). So any decent player who hits a lob that goes over his opponent's head is coming to net... and the tweener, 90% of the time, results in an easy volley winner. At least when you hit a lob, you can make your opponent hit a difficult OH. So, the lob has two advantages - it's easier to hit and it generally results in a more difficult shot for your opponent.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Also, more often than not, even if you hit the tweener "well"... it just goes right back to your opponent who's at the net and he bunts a volley for a winner. I can hit tweeners pretty decently, but... I can't aim them (most folks - even pros - can't - ok, meltphace can!). So any decent player who hits a lob that goes over his opponent's head is coming to net... and the tweener, 90% of the time, results in an easy volley winner. At least when you hit a lob, you can make your opponent hit a difficult OH. So, the lob has two advantages - it's easier to hit and it generally results in a more difficult shot for your opponent.
Which is why I'm working on the tweener lob! What could possibly go wrong??
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Admittedly if you can get back there quick enough to be set and under the ball as it bounces, then hit an overhead slice serve.

My strategy is run back, hit a lob, stay back and wait for another lob, than step up under it and hit a serve like slice overhead. Usually wins the point or gets a weak reply my net partner can hammer.
 
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Deleted member 23235

Guest
side note, rather than a tweaner... doing it to the side of you is easier
 
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