See (inside) what John Galt wrote recently...

DeShaun

Banned
..."It is a great all court stick and does everything pretty well. However, it requires a certain skill to take full advantage of it. And I ended up having to realize that while I could hit some amazing great feeling shots with it, I would break down in longer rallies when my footwork would be a little off or my form broke down. In those situations, it is easy to leave a ball short resulting in going from offense to defense very quickly. If I was a 4.5 level player, this would be my stick of choice."

He was discussing the Prestige Pro. I have heard variations on this theme multiple times from myriad people.

My question: would somebody new to tennis, only just beginning to learn his fundamental strokes, be better off avoiding the Prestige line until his strokes were developed? I bought a Prestige thinking that I could grow into it. But lately I've been wondering if I'll ever be able to harness it adequately. The consensus seems to be that these sticks are awfully demanding or exacting, and I was wondering if this feature might be hindering my development.

I have other sticks that I can practice/play matches with, but I want to tame the Prestige. As the same time, I identify with John when he said, "I ended up having to realize that while I could hit some amazing great feeling shots with it, I would break down in longer rallies when my...form broke down. In those situations, it is easy to leave a ball short."
 
Last edited:

t135

Professional
That whole scenario happens to any player, with any racquet, anytime. Bottom line is if the racquet doesn't fit your game, switch to one that does. I know 5.0's that play with the Wilson Profile. You've got to use what works for you.
 

Ross K

Legend
..."It is a great all court stick and does everything pretty well. However, it requires a certain skill to take full advantage of it. And I ended up having to realize that while I could hit some amazing great feeling shots with it, I would break down in longer rallies when my footwork would be a little off or my form broke down. In those situations, it is easy to leave a ball short resulting in going from offense to defense very quickly. If I was a 4.5 level player, this would be my stick of choice."

He was discussing the Prestige Pro. I have heard variations on this theme multiple times from myriad people.

My question: would somebody new to tennis, only just beginning to learn his fundamental strokes, be better off avoiding the Prestige line until his strokes were developed? I bought a Prestige thinking that I could grow into it. But lately I've been wondering if I'll ever be able to harness it adequately. The consensus seems to be that these sticks are awfully demanding or exacting, and I was wondering if this feature might be hindering my development.

I have other sticks that I can practice/play matches with, but I want to tame the Prestige. As the same time, I identify with John when he said, "I ended up having to realize that while I could hit some amazing great feeling shots with it, I would break down in longer rallies when my...form broke down. In those situations, it is easy to leave a ball short."
Wise words from John Galt.

IMO the answer to the red high-lighted is 'yes'.

It certainly applies to me when I (briefly) played the mg Pres mid, to a lesser but still undeniable degree with the PT630, and I'm still assessing if this applies to the YTPP.

Tbh, one more new string-job aside, the indicators and evidence - ie, winning matches :) - seems to suggest that while I love the weighting and balance, quality build, sweet way of swinging, feel, touch, etc aspects of the YTPP, I'm just slightly better suited to a more powerful and lighter frame - like the APD.

The only thing I would mention is, there are indeed other so called 'player's frames' that you might find suits you better than the YTPP (for example, I played pretty good with the C10 Pro and N95) - so you might not have to go down the tweener route per ce.... but i don't know if I should be telling you that!:roll:


R.
 

olliess

Semi-Pro
My question: would somebody new to tennis, only just beginning to learn his fundamental strokes, be better off avoiding the Prestige line until his strokes were developed?...The consensus seems to be that these sticks are awfully demanding or exacting, and I was wondering if this feature might be hindering my development.
I think I would not recommend the Prestige to a beginner just learning strokes. It isn't that you aren't "allowed" to, but it just takes quite a lot of footwork and stroke development before you can effectly handle a wide variety of shots that you will encounter in actual game play (as opposed to friendly rallying). IMHO Tennis is hard enough already without "artificially" creating a challenge for yourself like "playing up to X racquet."

Also, having a lighter racquet that requires less "stroke effort" lets you learn from an earlier stage what you can do with a tennis ball -- especially how the ball behaves with topspin -- and how that affects the playing of points.

Now if you have a coach who is helping you to develop proper form in the long term and prefers you learn on a player's stick, then it's a whole different ballgame, and I say go for it!
 

DavaiMarat

Professional
I play with the prestige mid. Probably one of the most demanding if not the most demanding frame out there. There's two philosophies out there. Suffer now or suffer later. I switched from a wide body to the mid early in my tennis years because it was the hardest racquets to play with. Yes at the beginning I took some lumps, it probably cost me some matches but hitting with it made me technically sound in all aspects. I couldn't hit late, I couldn't bunt the ball, I had to have sound footwork, I couldn't arm the serve and my eye hand coordination have to spot on. Yes, there are still some days I look at those PD or APD users and wonder why I should have to work so hard. Then again, I look at all it made me do and become, and those thoughts go away.

Theres a certain automatic respect you get from true players when you pull one of those prestiges out of your bag. It's like you earn your tennis the hard way and there's no gimmicks, just skill and full clean strokes because let's face it, you can't hit the ball any other way with a prestige.

Your choice mon ami.
 

DeShaun

Banned
Thank you, everyone. Your replies are appreciated.

I have been practicing my stokes while hitting with better players for the past two weeks. Over this period I have been using only my Prince exo graphite 93. I restrung the YTPP w/Bab VS, and the weather here in Seattle has been so wet. Given that I play outdoors exclusively, the TYPP hasn't seen the light of day since the new string job. Based on what you know about the graphite 93, can you think of any reason why strokes learned on it might not translate well to the TYPP? Are these rackets similar enough that a stroke learned on the Prince should not be too difficult to replicate on the Prestige? Or is the Prestige just way more obstinate and unwieldy than the Prince? Thanks
 
Last edited:

origmarm

Hall of Fame
The short answer to the Prestige for beginner question is no basically.

I think you can make the case for thinner beam, reasonable head frames but not really the higher end of those lines. I particularly like the MP Radical and the 6.1 95 Team for athletic beginners for that reason for example. Some of the feel and control with a bit of forgiveness. I used to like some of the older Prince Triple Threat racquets (Hornet I think) for the same reason.

Orig
 

HitItHarder

Semi-Pro
..."It is a great all court stick and does everything pretty well. However, it requires a certain skill to take full advantage of it. And I ended up having to realize that while I could hit some amazing great feeling shots with it, I would break down in longer rallies when my footwork would be a little off or my form broke down. In those situations, it is easy to leave a ball short resulting in going from offense to defense very quickly. If I was a 4.5 level player, this would be my stick of choice."
Who is John Galt?
I was wondering the same thing about who John Galt was too. Especially since the quote mentioned by the OP was word for word from one of my previous posts comparing the Prestige Pro and the Extreme Pro. See below.

The racquets play very differently as mentioned above.

The Extreme Pro is a stiff racquet with a very open string pattern and a solid swing weight. It excells at spin and has a lot power as well. You can do well with medium strokes and letting the racquet work for you. Although I think the racquet really excells when you swing out on the ball and allow all that spin you generate bring the ball down. It is definately what I would call a baseliner racquet. However, did I mention it is stiff. Not the most arm friendly of the Head racquets.

The Prestige Pro is an outstanding players stick. Lower powered and it has good control. Also, it is more arm friendly. Shots seem a little flatter and it is a great serving stick. But, as with all Prestiges, it requires solid form and full strokes to really take advange of it. Of all the racquets I have ever hit with, this is probably my favorite. It is a great all court stick and does everything pretty well. However, it requires a certain skill to take full advantage of it. And I ended up having to realize that while I could hit some amazing great feeling shots with it, I would break down in longer rallies when my footwork would be a little off or my form broke down. In those situations, it is easy to leave a ball short resulting in going from offense to defense very quickly. If I was a 4.5 level player, this would be my stick of choice. I'm not, so I will stick with my tweeners.

I dumped the Extreme Pro too. To stiff for my liking, but it was more user friendly. So I guess it just comes down to what you are looking for in a stick as to which you may like better.
 

DeShaun

Banned
I was wondering the same thing about who John Galt was too. Especially since the quote mentioned by the OP was word for word from one of my previous posts comparing the Prestige Pro and the Extreme Pro. See below.
Sorry. I must have attributed wrongly, unintentionally mistaken Galt for you, the true source.
 

Ross K

Legend
I was wondering the same thing about who John Galt was too. Especially since the quote mentioned by the OP was word for word from one of my previous posts comparing the Prestige Pro and the Extreme Pro. See below.
Originally Posted by HitItHarder
The racquets play very differently as mentioned above.

The Extreme Pro is a stiff racquet with a very open string pattern and a solid swing weight. It excells at spin and has a lot power as well. You can do well with medium strokes and letting the racquet work for you. Although I think the racquet really excells when you swing out on the ball and allow all that spin you generate bring the ball down. It is definately what I would call a baseliner racquet. However, did I mention it is stiff. Not the most arm friendly of the Head racquets.

The Prestige Pro is an outstanding players stick. Lower powered and it has good control. Also, it is more arm friendly. Shots seem a little flatter and it is a great serving stick. But, as with all Prestiges, it requires solid form and full strokes to really take advange of it. Of all the racquets I have ever hit with, this is probably my favorite. It is a great all court stick and does everything pretty well. However, it requires a certain skill to take full advantage of it. And I ended up having to realize that while I could hit some amazing great feeling shots with it, I would break down in longer rallies when my footwork would be a little off or my form broke down. In those situations, it is easy to leave a ball short resulting in going from offense to defense very quickly. If I was a 4.5 level player, this would be my stick of choice. I'm not, so I will stick with my tweeners.

I dumped the Extreme Pro too. To stiff for my liking, but it was more user friendly. So I guess it just comes down to what you are looking for in a stick as to which you may like better.
Hey Hit - yes, I thought it looked familiar... isn't that from the 'Diary of a Racketaholic' thread? Anyhow, just to say, I think your remarks re the YTPP, and the comparison between the YTPP and YTEP (I've played the MGEP), is absolutely spot on... you've definitely nailed what the YTPP is all about imo.

R.
 
Top