Seeking soft (NOT STIFF) string that won't stick out of place in daughter's Burn100LSv4 18x16

TLDR:
I'm looking for a soft and grippy black or orange colored multi that won't stay stuck out of place or break too quickly in my 14-year-old daughter's Burn 100LSv4. This is her first racquet ever (so, she's not already hooked on an expensive X-One Biphase or anything at that price-point, etc.).



Constraint 1: Color.
We are working with only black (or possibly orange) options here people. The strings "must" match the racquet, of course. So... that means no blue Ashaway Dynamite Soft, no natural-colored TF Triax or Gamma Professional, no gold IsoSpeed Energetic, or probably even no red X1BiPhase, etc. Because.

Constraint 2: Softness.
She's only 14, so I'd like to avoid stiff polys (and even the harshest mono nylons) for as long as possible. The racquet she chose is already relatively stiff, so I don't want to build an injury factory for her very first racquet.

Constraint 3: Won't stick out of place.
This racquet is bad for that, apparently. The one she demoed came with brand-new Sensation strung in it and strings were NEVER parallel. I have also heard others complain of this when using slicker strings like Head Velocity with this racquet-- so that makes me wonder if slippier strings like the (probably too stiff anyway) orange Volkl Synthetic Gut or the (probably too stiff anyway, but normally very slick) Babolat Synthetic Gut, or the Prince Premier Control might stick out of place instead of staying parallel. (But I am not a tennis player, so talk me out of eliminating a string if it is wrong to eliminate strings with similar string-to-string coefficients of friction as Velocity and Sensation, just because they are known to stick out of place very very badly with this racquet). I'm speculating, in part, based on some experiences shared in this thread "https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/ind...or-a-multi-on-an-18x16-string-pattern.570956/" and others here as well.

Constraint 4: Durability.
If I'm going with a multi, I'm going no smaller than a 16G here. I'm told the 18x16 Spin Effect is especially hard on multis, but that's exactly where I'm looking right now while she is young and a total beginner. Notice Contraint Number One trumps Constraint Number Four. I know I'm looking at strings that lose tension and fray to a frazzle. I can live with that, but would still like to maximize consistency (by minimizing tension fluctuations) as much as this can possibly be mitigated (given the other three priorities listed above).



I have no experience with strings or tennis in general, I just want to outfit my daughter with a string that will give her a consistent platform upon which she can learn (and not increase chances of injury).

>> Would the $11 (Black) Tecnifibre Multifeel 16/1.30 Solid Core be any "softer" or "less harsh" than the $4.25 (Gold) Prince Original Synthetic Gut 16/1.30 String or the $4.95 Prince Synthetic Gut Duraflex 16/1.30 (in Black or Orange). If so, would the black multifeel lose tension significantly quicker than, say, the Duraflex?

>> Would the $18 (Black) Dunlop Silk lose tension much worse than the grippier $19 (Black) Technifibre NRG2? If she sees the red X1BiPhase in person and likes the look with the orange bumper guard, would that be the way to go because it is so soft and grabby? Does it make sense to look at strings like that for a total beginner, or do the constraints we are dealing with push us into that realm?

>> Would it be better to do 16Ga Black Velocity in the mains with 16Ga Black Babolat SG crosses or16Ga Black Velocity in the crosses with 16Ga Black Babolat SG mains?
 
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MattHeup

New User
All strings will be displaced somewhat upon impact with the ball. Most strings will appear to "stay in place" for a while before gradually sticking more and more as the strings physically stretch, lose tension, and have less force pulling them straight, so to speak. The strings that seem to move less over the course of a session are likely actually moving more, as slicker strings slide back into place from that displacement more easily. Thus, if a string is slicker, it will stay in place more AFTER impact. Strings moving (and "snapping back" due to tension, exerting rotational force on the ball) during impact is a big part of what produces spin. If you want a string to stay in place for a long time, though, you should look for a string that has long-lasting slickness, which is not something I know anything at all about. So I can't give you any specific recommendations there, but in general slicker strings will be better for this, not stickier strings.
 
All strings will be displaced somewhat upon impact with the ball. Most strings will appear to "stay in place" for a while before gradually sticking more and more as the strings physically stretch, lose tension, and have less force pulling them straight, so to speak. The strings that seem to move less over the course of a session are likely actually moving more, as slicker strings slide back into place from that displacement more easily. Thus, if a string is slicker, it will stay in place more AFTER impact. Strings moving (and "snapping back" due to tension, exerting rotational force on the ball) during impact is a big part of what produces spin. If you want a string to stay in place for a long time, though, you should look for a string that has long-lasting slickness, which is not something I know anything at all about. So I can't give you any specific recommendations there, but in general slicker strings will be better for this, not stickier strings.
That's what I thought at first. I was looking into options like Prince Lightning Pro, Prince Premier Control, Head Velocity, Wilson NXT, Wilson Sensation, Babolat Synthetic Gut, and Volkl Synthetic Gut.

But then my daughter's Burn-with-Sensation demo experience, and other comments (in another thread) about Velocity also sticking out of place made me wonder if my hypothesis was backwards for this particular stringed layout for some reason.

Maybe Sensation just lacks "long-lasting slickness."
 
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Return_Ace

Hall of Fame
Not wanting to sound rude or anything, but iirc from the Angell thread, this is your daughter's first racket and she's atm still a beginner?

At which point, i know it's natural to want "the best" for her (although you're obviously able to rationalise no poly, no X1 biphase etc.), I think you're massively over thinking things here.

This isn't going to be her only string job, you aren't buying a reel (i hope not at least) that she's going to have to commit to for the next ~20 or so restrings, and afaik, she may not even have the technique to sufficiently displace strings that they'd get stuck out of place (aside from your experience with Sensation, but i also don't know tension, who strung it - demos are sometimes treated rather lazily; not to mention, the thread you're quoting is about a 4.5 player... very different to a beginner).

If she's truly new to tennis, just give her the basic (in terms of cost) Velocity or old faithful PSGD (or any of your options really) until you think there's an issue with them (be it staying out of place, durability etc.).

But tbh i honestly don't think you'll have an issue with any of your constraints at the level of tennis we're discussing (except maybe strings moving... but to be fair, she's going to have to get used to it, can't be getting restrings every single time strings don't snapback, and it's only going to get worse as her technique develops).

Sorry for being blunt, i love the detail you're putting in for her, but the best thing for her to advance is to play and not necessarily focus on which syn gut / multi she should use :).
 

BlueB

Legend
Everything but poly gets stuck out of position... Let her get into a habit of aligning the strings between the points, it's a great ritual to refocus!

Sensation mains will behave a lot better with a smooth poly cross. You can use something really soft (for a poly), inexpensive and black, like Isospeed Baseline and string it at a lot lower tension than Sensation mains.

Or just string entire bed of the Baseline, at low tension. It will feel softer than many syn guts.
 
Well, here is my suggestion.

1. If you and your daughter are going to seriously pursue tennis, think about buying a basic
stringing machine so you can experiment with different strings/tensions/combinations.

2. Try some Isospeed Professional 17. It is a good, all-round, gut-like string. Unfortunately, it is not black.
It is the color of spaghetti. What I suggest, is to make up a template and color the strings black with stencil coloring- except for a tennis ball sized circle in the center (sweet spot)- orange. Now the colors will match- but more importantly,
as the coloring wears off from ball impact you can track her ball striking by the wear pattern.

Good luck.
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
I think this is another classic "want a soft string" request targeting a spin effect racquet that eats string.

I will bite and say Head Velocity Black 15L.

My under my breath suggestion, especially for a Junior player, is a more flexible 16x19 mid range racquet that is less stiff and will not be as hard on strings. Ultimately, I think she will develop better strokes and rely on proper technique for spin ultimately developed thru good coaching. Moreover, you reference consistent performance thru coaching and I think a change to a less stiff traditional performance racquet will achieve that.
 

Rosstour

Legend
I think this is another classic "want a soft string" request targeting a spin effect racquet that eats string.

I will bite and say Head Velocity Black 15L.

My under my breath suggestion, especially for a Junior player, is a more flexible 16x19 mid range racquet that is less stiff and will not be as hard on strings. Ultimately, I think she will develop better strokes and rely on proper technique for spin ultimately developed thru good coaching. Moreover, you reference consistent performance thru coaching and I think a change to a less stiff traditional performance racquet will achieve that.
Yes...a 13oz stick, 8 or more pts HL is the way to go for a beginning tween.
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
No I am not saying that. However, certainly a stiff spin effect racquet is not appropriate for a 14 year old.

Do you need examples?

I am just pulling these out without research and not knowing how big she is style of play, skill etc. Willson Blade 100L, Wilson Clash 100L, Wilson Prostaff 97L, if she wants to stick with Wilson..... Or perhaps Head.. I hope you get the idea and take it from there. It is not hard.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
[1] 16 Ga Blk Babolat SG
[2] 16 Ga Blk Babolat SG mains and 17 Ga Blk Babolat SG crosses
[3] 16 Ga Blk Head Velocity
[4] 16 Ga Blk Velocity mains and 16 Ga Orange PSGD crosses
[5] 17 Ga Blk Velocity mains and 16 Ga Orange PSGD crosses

These would be my options based on your daughter's criteria. The recommended tension range is 50-60#. For her 1st string job, try 55# or less. My preference would be 52#. I believe that your strings will be plenty soft (~150-160#/in which is multifiber range.) In contrast, I play with strings in the 190-200#/in and so called baseline sluggers are at 220-300 #/in. Option 5 will definetly keep the mains fairly straight. FWIW, if she wants Black mains and Orange crosses, use the Babolat SG in the mains and the Orange PSGD in the crosses. Reminds me of the times I have strung for ladies' team and they had the same type of request for strings in their team colors. :eek:8-B:happydevil:.
 
Lol.

[1] 16 Ga Blk Babolat SG
[2] 16 Ga Blk Babolat SG mains and 17 Ga Blk Babolat SG crosses
[3] 16 Ga Blk Head Velocity
[4] 16 Ga Blk Velocity mains and 16 Ga Orange PSGD crosses
[5] 17 Ga Blk Velocity mains and 16 Ga Orange PSGD crosses

These would be my options based on your daughter's criteria. The recommended tension range is 50-60#. For her 1st string job, try 55# or less. My preference would be 52#. I believe that your strings will be plenty soft (~150-160#/in which is multifiber range.) In contrast, I play with strings in the 190-200#/in and so called baseline sluggers are at 220-300 #/in. Option 5 will definetly keep the mains fairly straight. FWIW, if she wants Black mains and Orange crosses, use the Babolat SG in the mains and the Orange PSGD in the crosses. Reminds me of the times I have strung for ladies' team and they had the same type of request for strings in their team colors. :eek:8-B:happydevil:.
Thanks @esgee48 Would Option 4 keep the mains straighter than 16Ga Blk Velocity mains and 16Ga Orange Volkl Synthetic Gut?

I read that Babolat Synthetic Gut stays slick really long. What about 16Ga Black Velocity in the mains with 16Ga Black Babolat SG crosses?
 
Not wanting to sound rude or anything, but iirc from the Angell thread, this is your daughter's first racket and she's atm still a beginner?

At which point, i know it's natural to want "the best" for her (although you're obviously able to rationalise no poly, no X1 biphase etc.), I think you're massively over thinking things here.

This isn't going to be her only string job, you aren't buying a reel (i hope not at least) that she's going to have to commit to for the next ~20 or so restrings, and afaik, she may not even have the technique to sufficiently displace strings that they'd get stuck out of place (aside from your experience with Sensation, but i also don't know tension, who strung it - demos are sometimes treated rather lazily; not to mention, the thread you're quoting is about a 4.5 player... very different to a beginner).

If she's truly new to tennis, just give her the basic (in terms of cost) Velocity or old faithful PSGD (or any of your options really) until you think there's an issue with them (be it staying out of place, durability etc.).

But tbh i honestly don't think you'll have an issue with any of your constraints at the level of tennis we're discussing (except maybe strings moving... but to be fair, she's going to have to get used to it, can't be getting restrings every single time strings don't snapback, and it's only going to get worse as her technique develops).

Sorry for being blunt, i love the detail you're putting in for her, but the best thing for her to advance is to play and not necessarily focus on which syn gut / multi she should use :).
Not rude at all. If I had a nickel for every time pulled me out of the deep end of things, I could afford to spend all of my time lost in the weeds.

Yes, she's a total beginner (and her Mom and I have never played, nor do we now). My daughter doesn't want to compete at a USTA Circuit Level, but she does want to compete on her high school no-cut team.
 
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esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Lol.
Thanks @esgee48 Would Option 4 keep the mains straighter than 16Ga Blk Velocity mains and 16Ga Orange Volkl Synthetic Gut?

I read that Babolat Synthetic Gut stays slick really long. What about 16Ga Black Velocity in the mains with 16Ga Black Babolat SG crosses?
I do not use Volkl SG, so not sure about their string COF or durability. I go with what I have used myself or in clients.
Good catch. Blk Velocity mains and Blk Bab SG crosses would also be a very good option 3A.
 
I do not use Volkl SG, so not sure about their string COF or durability. I go with what I have used myself or in clients.
Good catch. Blk Velocity mains and Blk Bab SG crosses would also be a very good option 3A.
Thanks @esgee48 The Vokl SG:
Stiffness is 177.7
Tension loss is 9.9
Tension % loss is19.7
String to String is 0.087
and Spin is 5.1
according to the TW database.
 
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Well, here is my suggestion.

1. If you and your daughter are going to seriously pursue tennis, think about buying a basic
stringing machine so you can experiment with different strings/tensions/combinations.
The $20 per string job fees really have me seriously eyeing the stringing machine forum here.

2. Try some Isospeed Professional 17. It is a good, all-round, gut-like string. Unfortunately, it is not black.
It is the color of spaghetti. What I suggest, is to make up a template and color the strings black with stencil coloring- except for a tennis ball sized circle in the center (sweet spot)- orange. Now the colors will match- but more importantly,
as the coloring wears off from ball impact you can track her ball striking by the wear pattern.
Cool idea! That's awesome.
 
I think this is another classic "want a soft string" request targeting a spin effect racquet that eats string.
Yes, sorry to dig up bones. I did read past threads, and only posted again because some strings (like Velocity) weren't out when the last threads I found were first posted.

I will bite and say Head Velocity Black 15L.
Thanks, I will definitely give this a shot.

My under my breath suggestion, especially for a Junior player, is a more flexible 16x19 mid range racquet that is less stiff and will not be as hard on strings. Ultimately, I think she will develop better strokes and rely on proper technique for spin ultimately developed thru good coaching. Moreover, you reference consistent performance thru coaching and I think a change to a less stiff traditional performance racquet will achieve that.
Yeh, her Coach's philosophy was for her first racquet, to let her have something that SHE liked. Once she joins the high school team and swings some of her teammates' racquets, and sees what players from other schools are swinging, everything will change. Until then, she needed something to practice with.

... certainly a stiff spin effect racquet is not appropriate for a 14 year old. I am just pulling these out without research and not knowing how big she is style of play, skill etc. Willson Blade 100L, Wilson Clash 100L, Wilson Prostaff 97L, if she wants to stick with Wilson..... Or perhaps Head.. I hope you get the idea and take it from there. It is not hard.
She is short for her age. Strong, but not hyper-athletic. Her skill level is beginner. She's currently waiting for her first racquet to arrive, so she's not experienced enough to have a "style of play."

She also demoed the Head Radical S 2021, the Babolat Pure Strike Team 3rd Gen, the Wilson Clash 100L, the Head Gravity Lite, the Yonex Vcore 100L, the Head Graphene 360+ Speed S, the Babolat Evo Drive Lite Prestrung, the Prince Textreme Warrior 100T, the Babolat Pure Aero Team 2019, the Babolat Pure Drive Team 2021, and the Yonex Ezone 105... but she did not like any of them. She did like the Wilson Burn LS v4, the Wilson Blade 100L v7, and the Yonex Ezone 100L.
 

golden chicken

Hall of Fame
I strung my wife's Burn 100 with black velocity 16g at 57lbs on my X-2 and she never straightens her strings out. I just popped it out of the bag to have a look and while they aren't perfect, I wouldn't say they're all over the place, either.
 

golden chicken

Hall of Fame
While I'm thinking about it, next string job will probably be at a lower tension for her. Maybe 52ish. I think I blunted the power of the racket a little too much for her stringing at 57.
 

eah123

Semi-Pro
My girl is 13 and has been playing for 4 years. She did orange ball x 1 year and green ball x2 years and has been playing with regular yellow balls for the last year. She is always the best player in her clinic because they don’t really teach strokes in clinics, and I practice with her outside of the clinic at least a couple times a week.

If your girl is a complete beginner, she would benefit greatly from doing a green ball program. Green balls are lighter, softer, bounce less and move slower. With green balls, it really doesn’t matter what kind of string, and you don’t have to restring more than once a year.

With regular yellow balls, I really think the best possible string for beginner to intermediate juniors is Prince SG Duraflex 16. Restringing every 6 months would be perfect.
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
My daughter is not a tournament player. She plays 3rd singles on her no cut high school team. The 1st player is a tournament player and qualified for the state tournament (top 16) in Ohio.

my daughter is 15 and plays in with the group that takes lesson and goes to clinics, etc. She’s an athlete and tennis is her fun sport. I’m a higher level 4.0 player that doesn’t play enough league play to get bumped up to 4.5 but I regularly beat lower level 4.5 players too.

I play Prince Syn Gut w/ Duraflex and I don’t care if they side around. I find it funny when they’re all to one side or there’s large gaps. They break for me in 2-4 hours of play. I’d play poly if my elbow didn’t get tender after a week on the same set. I string myself so it makes no difference to me when I’m paying at most $2/set.

My daughter used Head Hawk Touch 17. That stuff has been in her racquet for over a year. She hits hard but she’s likely not going to break a string. She would be 3.5 player if she played league tennis. It’s a poly and doesn’t slide out of place.

My bet is your daughter, being a beginner, isn’t going to notice her strings for playability. She may notice the initial stiffness, color, and sliding and that’s it. Buy a good looking color and stop overthinking. Make it a poly and use it all year long.
 

g4driver

Hall of Fame
My .02

Ditch the orange and black WIlson Burn 18x16 frame and get your daughter a legit 16x19 frame like @LOBALOT mentioned. Plenty of better options for your daughter. I've strung over 7000 frames in the last 5 years and many for 14 year beginners

A 16x19 Head Speed MP 4 1/8 grip or L1 for $89 USD works. RA 66, 300 gram.. I have personally outfitted dozens of juniors with that frame and Tecnfibre Multifeel Mains / Velocity crosses. If you spend more than $99 on a frame that isn't a 16x19 your not doing your homework. Focus on the right things. Ditch the Burn ULS. Stringing fees and strings for that Burn will soon vastly exceed the price of new 16x19 frame. Head makes a Speed MPA that can be stung either 16x16 or 16x19 with nearly identical specs and that frame is also $89 I believe.

The Burn ULS and frames like them with 18x16 patterns eat strings, including polys. Head Velocity / Cream is the best solution I have found for beginners with that frame, but Cream only comes in one color.. Cream.

Next tell her the truth... if she is concerned about the color of her strings, her focus is misplaced.But there is hope. she will be perfect as a 3.0 lady when she grows up with a Blade 98 and Hyoer G. ;)

If you want what teaching pros use for their beginners, send me a PM. I can't post the link here but you can buy the exact frame or frame I recommend to parents and it is from an authorized seller in North America. $89 and free shipping no tax.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
My 2 cents. If she's a beginner, you won't have to worry about the strings moving for a couple (maybe more) years. For Pete's sake, put some 16 gauge (appropriately colored) synthetic gut in her frame at mid-tension. Do NOT put any poly or poly-derived string in her frame. It'll feel harsh, could hurt her arm and she won't be able as a beginner, to reap any benefit from it.

My daughter is soon to be 31 and is playing league. She plays with a Wilson frame 16 X 19 and is fairly light. I strung it with synthetic gut. My daughter plays 3.0. The strings don't move and she neither knows or cares what it is strung with.
 

g4driver

Hall of Fame
My 2 cents. If she's a beginner, you won't have to worry about the strings moving for a couple (maybe more) years. For Pete's sake, put some 16 gauge (appropriately colored) synthetic gut in her frame at mid-tension. Do NOT put any poly or poly-derived string in her frame. It'll feel harsh, could hurt her arm and she won't be able as a beginner, to reap any benefit from it.

My daughter is soon to be 31 and is playing league. She plays with a Wilson frame 16 X 19 and is fairly light. I strung it with synthetic gut. My daughter plays 3.0. The strings don't move and she neither knows or cares what it is strung with.
@Rabbit ? Did you have a father/daughter movie night and watch Fight Club with her? ;)

 

cameron9713

New User
You may want to give Tourna Black Zone a try. It's a soft, slick poly that I use in my kids racquets. They make it in a 19 gauge so it's as soft as possible. My son has started to snap it pretty quick now but he's hitting the ball almost as hard as me now so I've moved him up to a 17 gauge to help with that.
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
You might also want to consider Ashaway Monogut ZX, either 16 or 17 gauge, both of which are available in black and are comfortable.
 
Really interesting stats on the Nylon/Zyex...

Stiffness (lb/in)Total Tension Loss (lbs)Tension Loss (%)String/String COFSpin Potential
Ashaway MonoGut ZX 16114.3 lb/in23.8lbs47%0.0884.4.
 

g4driver

Hall of Fame
For crying out loud this girl is a beginner.. to the posters who are completely clueless about strings and how long it would take a beginner to break a string, please stop with the poly suggestions.

The OP self admitted he knows little to nothing about tennis or strings in his original post.

There are several highly experienced stringers on this forum then there are plenty of posters on TW have never strung a frame in their life suggesting polys to beginners. Just stop. That is just terrible advice. Advice from random posters who know very little to nothing about strings is the way many people like the OP get their kids hurt. @Rabbit @Wes @am1899 @jwocky@Steve Huff
@jim e
are stringers with credibility. (sorry left these last two guys off the first time)

Taking advice to use a full bed of black poly in beginners 18x16 frame because it matches the frames color is just terrible advice.


Collaborative Effort By Bob Patterson:

When it comes to poly strings, we all need to make sure adult recreational players and juniors know the facts.

I speak to many manufacturers, coaches, and racquet technicians, and the consensus is that recreational adult players and junior players are using the wrong type of string, tension—or both.

Stiff polyester strings are prevalent in the marketplace and dominate the pro tours, but are they suited for the average club or league player? Most in this industry don’t think so.

First, the very benefit of poly strings is their ability to bend and snap back faster than other materials. This snapback enhances spin on the ball. A pro can swing out and get more spin on the ball while generating a heavier shot. You might think that would be the same for your average junior or club player, but it is most definitely not the case. Most players can’t generate enough racquet-head speed to bend stiff poly strings in the first place. If the string doesn't bend, it can’t snap back, and there is little or no spin enhancement. Many recreational players who switch to a poly never adjust their tension.

I’m always amazed to hear of a 3.5 adult or junior using a full poly set-up at high tensions. This is a surefire way for a player to hurt his or her arm.

Second, monofilament poly strings lose their elasticity—or the ability to snap back—much faster than nylon
or other string materials. Since poly strings have a fairly dead feeling to begin with, their decline is less noticeable for recreational players, who tend to not restring as often as they should, which only makes the problem worse.

Not only is poly string wrong for most recreational and junior players, it can be harmful. The stiffer string
coupled with stiffer, lighter racquet creates much more shock to the player when the ball impacts the stringbed. In recent years, we’ve seen arm and wrist injuries sideline many top pros, and these athletes train and take every precaution to prevent injury. If we all know it is a problem, how do we fix it?

It starts with education: inform players about why they should alter their string set-up. It is better for their health and for their game. Manufacturers need to step up, too.

It is easy to market a string their top sponsored player is using, but companies need to make rec players aware that string may not be best for everyone. Then they need to offer a softer, better-suited string.

The bottom line is that we all need to address this issue. Injured players play less, and may stop playing altogether.

And that’s not good for anyone. •

Bob Patterson:
Executive Director of
the U.S. Racquet Stringers Association.
Tennis Industry: Nov/Dec 2017
 
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Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
@g4driver great post and that is exactly why I use an 18 gauge poly in the crosses. I don't even stock 16 gauge poly. If someone wants poly I steer them to the thinnest gauge they'll accept. The thinner a string the more it'll deflect. Club players can get some benefit out of a thin poly, but even then it's not the advantage higher level players get.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Really interesting stats on the Nylon/Zyex...

Stiffness (lb/in)Total Tension Loss (lbs)Tension Loss (%)String/String COFSpin Potential
Ashaway MonoGut ZX 16114.3 lb/in23.8lbs47%0.0884.4.
This is a niche string. It is very fragile when being installed. You cannot string over 60#. You need to be careful tying knots because sharp turns could break the string. It does need a significant manual pre-stretch. If you do not do it, it loses tension too quickly. Best use IME is as a cross where the mains will not destroy the string.
 

UseTheFrame

New User
To the OP: You might have heard this before, but You Are Seriously Overthinking This, HOLY COW!!

Your daughter is a "total BEGINNER", and you have a NINE paragraph specification for string for her new racket that she bought after you guys apparently demo-ed FOURTEEN rackets. You need to dial it down before someone gets hurt. (I am kind of kidding, but will mention that my wife had a father that was obsessed with details of her tennis game/equipment, she ended up quitting tennis for about 20 years until he passed, just now starting to play again and greatly enjoying it).

Get any racket, get any string (except for poly), and let her play with it for 6 months or even a year (ie, a lot!), THEN demo some rackets and MAYBE think about string at that point. Heck, right now probably picking a racket (and string) based on her favorite/desired color alone is probably the best avenue.
 
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