Seniors lounge (over 50) come on in.

Ruark

Semi-Pro
I'm 66 (67 in a couple of months), and just starting with a Pure Aero Tour, after playing with an old middle-80s trampoline 107 for many years. See my post "New Pure Aero Tour" in the Racquets forum.

I prefer playing singles. Nothing personal, just never cared for doubles.

Back then I lived and breathed tennis, played almost 7 days a week in the 3.5 - 4.0 leagues, then life took me away from tennis. I'm just now getting back into it after a 25 year layoff. I have the same leg issues as Hurricane; I just run out of gas, but I'm working on my diet and my cardio and really getting tougher. Lots of water and stretching really helps, too. It's dismaying how stiff you get over the years. I've learned to never, NEVER start playing without getting limbered up first.
 
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nvr2old

Professional
Depends on the person, how they have lived their life and view the world. I've met some amazing people in their 80s and 90s.


You should strive to reach 5.0 by age 60.
Bravo. With age comes wisdom. Life is sometimes hard when one gets old and it takes great courage to carry on. We all get old, or should hope to, as the alternative is not good.
 
https://www.flickr.com/gp/145516804@N08/UDNz37I think we need our own lounge to hang out. Away from all the silly teenager questions....

What frames are you using now in later life? Gone lighter? Have you changed your diet, exercise routine? Favorite wines, bourbons. What has helped your game? What is killing your game? Retired? Retiring soon?
Age:

Double nickels (55) this May.

Frames:

I love trying out different frames/set ups but still play best with my modified Asian K90's (although the PA VS and a vintage Trisys 260 "Bumblebee" are tempting in certain ways) :) All of my frames are tuned to the same spec, so not lighter, just more "free" power with the MP and OS models. Full poly or Kevlar/gut, but at lower tension nowadays.

Diet:

I am fortunate in that I actually PREFER healthy foods and always have-that makes things easier. ;) I pretty much don't touch sugar, outside of Gatorade and I'm looking for a good alternative to that (drinks with protein in them wreck my stomach during play) Basically fish, a little lean meat, and fruits/veggies. I've learned how important it is to hydrate and have drastically reduced (but not completed eliminated-I still love a good mug of Joe!) caffeine. I drink a LOT of water everyday.

Exercise:

I play tennis 3-4 days a week and mostly singles. Although I enjoy set play/competition, over the last several years I've focused primarily on drilling for fitness and tiebreakers to stay sharp with point play. Historically, I took up tennis at age 15 and was recruited for DI play. After a short stint in college I was sidelined between the ages of 19 and 32 by virtue of injury and life circumstances. I'd injured my shoulder lifting weights as a nineteen year old rising sophomore in college and then was absorbed in my studies and professional school for more than a decade thereafter. So the upshot of it all was that I didn't touch a tennis racquet for more than 13 years after that injury. As my life became more sane, I VERY slowly started back in the early 90's with extremely limited hitting. In 1996 I met a former WTA pro. We became great friends and I began hitting/competing with her in tournament play. After she moved away my tennis lapsed again for a time before I Fell BACK in love with the game in the early 2000's. In retrospect my best tennis was still ahead, and I started hitting my stride (really playing regularly) about 5-7 years later, often playing 7 days a week. I've been blessed to be close friends with a couple of different wildly successful DI and pro (former ATP and WTA) coaches and to have access to an incredible facility and lots of very strong players just minutes from my home and office. My office manager was #1 in the 30's in our USTA section when we were younger and was also a successful coach in his own right. My most frequent practice partners (my own age) have been players who were also highly capable, including a guy who still posts a strong winning record in 5.0 play and another who was a former hitting partner for two world #1's. I often hit with the local DI girls as well.

I like other forms of exercise, especially yoga, but don't do it as often as I should. I am trying to become more disciplined in that way. I get a massage every few weeks, and have recently started learning more about mindfulness and meditation.

Favorite drinks:

I don't drink alcohol, at all. I don't like how even just a little affects my body. However I LOVE great scotch and single barrel bourbons, especially with a good cigar. I don't smoke either, but get the appeal of both. Just prefer feeling really healthy to those brief pleasures. :0

Wh'at's helped your game?

Getting smarter, learning how small the margins are in competitive play (i.e. how 'hanging in there' under pressure really pays off.

What's killing your game?

Basically normal aging. Although I managed to avoid surgery on my injured shoulder and really am not limited by it nowadays at all, i've had two torn menisci and while again no surgery I just don't have same fearlessness to run (and stop!) I once enjoyed.

Retirement?

No interest in retiring any time soon as I love my work too much.....maybe gradually working less over the next 15-20 years?

Probably TMI, but there you go. :) BHBH
 
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Vanhalen

Professional
Evening guys. Watched the Cincy finals then went out and hit with my ball machine for a little over an hour. Now having a small chocolate shake....love them and checking my forums: Acoustic guitar forum, Rig talk, The Gear page, Early Retirement Forum, Tennis Warehouse, Cafe Pharma.....and working up the courage to start my expense report..ugh.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
I don't drink alcohol, at all. I don't like how even just a little affects my body. However I LOVE great scotch and single barrel bourbons, especially with a good cigar. I don't smoke either, but get the appeal of both.
You mean you have once had them and liked them but now no longer have them?
 

onehandbh

Legend
Age:

Double nickels (55) this May.

Frames:

I love trying out different frames/set ups but still play best with my modified Asian K90's (although the PA VS and a vintage Trisys 260 "Bumblebee" are tempting in certain ways) :) All of my frames are tuned to the same spec, so not lighter, just more "free" power with the MP and OS models. Full poly or Kevlar/gut, but at lower tension nowadays.

Diet:

I am fortunate in that I actually PREFER healthy foods and always have-that makes things easier. ;) I pretty much don't touch sugar, outside of Gatorade and I'm looking for a good alternative to that (drinks with protein in them wreck my stomach during play) Basically fish, a little lean meat, and fruits/veggies. I've learned how important it is to hydrate and have drastically reduced (but not completed eliminated-I still love a good mug of Joe!) caffeine. I drink a LOT of water everyday.

Exercise:

I play tennis 3-4 days a week and mostly singles. Although I enjoy set play/competition, over the last several years I've focused primarily on drilling for fitness and tiebreakers to stay sharp with point play. Historically, I took up tennis at age 15 and was recruited for DI play. After a short stint in college I was sidelined between the ages of 19 and 32 by virtue of injury and life circumstances. I'd injured my shoulder lifting weights as a nineteen year old rising sophomore in college and then was absorbed in my studies and professional school for more than a decade thereafter. So the upshot of it all was that I didn't touch a tennis racquet for more than 13 years after that injury. As my life became more sane, I VERY slowly started back in the early 90's with extremely limited hitting. In 1996 I met a former WTA pro. We became great friends and I began hitting/competing with her in tournament play. After she moved away my tennis lapsed again for a time before I Fell BACK in love with the game in the early 2000's. In retrospect my best tennis was still ahead, and I started hitting my stride (really playing regularly) about 5-7 years later, often playing 7 days a week. I've been blessed to be close friends with a couple of different wildly successful DI and pro (former ATP and WTA) coaches and to have access to an incredible facility and lots of very strong players just minutes from my home and office. My office manager was #1 in the 30's in our USTA section when we were younger and was also a successful coach in his own right. My most frequent practice partners (my own age) have been players who were also highly capable, including a guy who still posts a strong winning record in 5.0 play and another who was a former hitting partner for two world #1's. I often hit with the local DI girls as well.

I like other forms of exercise, especially yoga, but don't do it as often as I should. I am trying to become more disciplined in that way. I get a massage every few weeks, and have recently started learning more about mindfulness and meditation.

Favorite drinks:

I don't drink alcohol, at all. I don't like how even just a little affects my body. However I LOVE great scotch and single barrel bourbons, especially with a good cigar. I don't smoke either, but get the appeal of both. Just prefer feeling really healthy to those brief pleasures. :0

Wh'at's helped your game?

Getting smarter, learning how small the margins are in competitive play (i.e. how 'hanging in there' under pressure really pays off.

What's killing your game?

Basically normal aging. Although I managed to avoid surgery on my injured shoulder and really am not limited by it nowadays at all, i've had two torn menisci and while again no surgery I just don't have same fearlessness to run (and stop!) I once enjoyed.

Retirement?

No interest in retiring any time soon as I love my work too much.....maybe gradually working less over the next 15-20 years?

Probably TMI, but there you go. :) BHBH
Wow! Thanks for the detailed reply.

Not 50s yet, but one of my goals is to be healthy, happy, and still able to play tennis at a good level and have fun as I get older.
Thus far I have been lucky to be mostly injury-free or at least to have fully recovered from any previous injuries (e.g. basketball ankle injury).

I don't go crazy with my diet, but I usually eat a healthy diet and eat whenever I am hungry and eat until I am full. I eat snacks at night because I don't like to go to sleep on an empty stomach. Only a little alcohol occasionally, no sodas except for an occasional ginger ale.

One area I've slacked off a bit since I haven't been doing as much yoga lately, is stretching and flexibility training.
 
You mean you have once had them and liked them but now no longer have them?
Yes. I drank in small amounts and enjoyed the occasional cigar during my twenties and earl thirties but haven't had either in more than 20 years. I never had a problem with it, I just realized it had adverse effects on my body.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

toby55555

Hall of Fame
57 and playing around 3-4 times a week mostly with much younger players as I'm a handy singles player who took the trouble to develop modern ATP style strokes late in my 'career'. That said I do play in vets singles tournaments, entering all the age groups, 35+ 45+ and 55+
Only doubles I play is league tennis in two different counties one for a small club where I'm a big fish (#2 seed) and one for an Elite club where I know my place (around 30th of 500).
Bought a ball machine last Feb, that is all the aerobic excercise I need other than an Airdyne I use to warm up before setting off.
Play with pro Kennex Q5, any other rackets seem to aggravate my elbow, nothing to do with age as I've been using them as long as I can remember. Wilson NXT comfort but trying NRG2 and rather liking the extra pop, x-one Biphase I found a bit too powerful.
 

Vanhalen

Professional
played a singles match this afternoon, nice dinner and now getting ready for.........



Bachelor in Paradise!!!! Quality tv.
 

Wise one

Hall of Fame
https://www.flickr.com/gp/145516804@N08/UDNz37I think we need our own lounge to hang out. Away from all the silly teenager questions....

What frames are you using now in later life? Gone lighter? Have you changed your diet, exercise routine? Favorite wines, bourbons. What has helped your game? What is killing your game? Retired? Retiring soon?

Age 67 here, currently playing with Donnay Borg Pro wood 4 1/2 Medium (14 oz racquet) strung with 17 gauge VS team.
 

nvr2old

Professional
So, when you find your favorite frame, how many do you stock up on? I am loving the Burn 100 Team. Only $99 so I picked up 4. I figure these will last me for my tennis duration. Flexible, lightweight platform to add some lead if needed. You?

https://www.flickr.com/gp/145516804@N08/T8vS02
I got one originally for my wife who has moved to a Head Tsi6. I really like her Burn 100 Team. Added leather grip and lead at 12 o'clock and it's a bargain.

To answer your question though just 2. For multiple different frames though.
 
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ChaelAZ

Legend
how do you guys deal with playing in low light? ie dusk, indoor lighting, etc,... i find as i get older my eyesight gets worse
At 48, this is a huge issue for me. It is compounded at some of the crappy facilities we have to play at that simply use cheap fluorescent lights. I lose the ball often in dusk, sunset skies, and if courts are really dark I have to close my eyes for about 10 minutes before a match to try to adjust (fer realz). All said, I end up having to be very active with feet because I pick up the ball so late coming in, then compensate for bad positioning as much as possible.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
At 48, this is a huge issue for me. It is compounded at some of the crappy facilities we have to play at that simply use cheap fluorescent lights. I lose the ball often in dusk, sunset skies, and if courts are really dark I have to close my eyes for about 10 minutes before a match to try to adjust (fer realz). All said, I end up having to be very active with feet because I pick up the ball so late coming in, then compensate for bad positioning as much as possible.
i played indoors yesterday, at a nice/newish facility,... and i literatlly can't see the ball til it comes over the net...
need to use glasses (better, but not great, compared to just bright sunlight), but then need to deal with fogging, humidity, etc...
in my twenties... i used to mock in my head, folks that used to complain about lighting... blah, blah, blah - excuses for getting smoked.
now i'm that guy (though i don't complain aloud ... just in here :p)

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/13/health/13brody.html?mcubz=3
i guess another reason seniors prefer waking up early, vs. being out at night.
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
i used to mock in my head, folks that used to complain about lighting... blah, blah, blah - excuses for getting smoked.
now i'm that guy (though i don't complain aloud ... just in here :p)
Same. I have my dominant eye that is having focus issues more than my left eye, causing some really messed-up depth perception issues. Some mornings they are find, but this weekend I whiffed (missed swinging) on 4 balls. They just were not where I thought they were. That...is really frustrating.
 

nvr2old

Professional
I don't have low light vision problems but do wear glasses for the last 16 years. Can't play without them.
 

Vanhalen

Professional
Same. I have my dominant eye that is having focus issues more than my left eye, causing some really messed-up depth perception issues. Some mornings they are find, but this weekend I whiffed (missed swinging) on 4 balls. They just were not where I thought they were. That...is really frustrating.
I had this issue! Back to the optometrist and he realized I needed what was called a prism put in my lenses it made all the difference in the world everything is now sharply focused
 

onehandbh

Legend
For those that struggle with vision at night, do you wear glasses? I wear contacts most of the time and especially at night if I'm driving due to the glare from glasses.
Some of this is my own fault, though bc I haven't had the coating on my glasses redone yet and they are a bit scratched up. Hmm. Maybe I should let them get scratched up even more so I can get some cool anamorphic flares...
 

Bobs tennis

Semi-Pro
Depth perception- This is interesting because I have been feeling I do prep early on strokes but often come thru late. I'm not gauging the depth of ball. I've tried wearing and not wearing glasses, even shortening strokes .
 

mntlblok

Professional
Age 64. Just got bumped back up to 4.5. No local leagues in which to play, but it would mean playing on hard courts if there were, and that ain't gonna happen. Three knee surgeries (one replacement - my only "good" joint) and one shoulder surgery. Wrist is shot and had been working around it, but it's getting worse, too. Dues for tennis just went up to something like 560 per month here, so dropped that club membership and joined another clay court club about 35 minutes away. But, a large percentage of my play/hitting (six or seven days a week) has been with the little wifey, who now has back issues and can barely get out on the court. The golden years. :) Concentrating on my other hobby, underwater photography, which includes regular six hour drives. Working towards dying of gluttony. Love my Miller Lites with a squeeze of lime, but often just make very large, very weak mixes of cheap rum and diet Dr. Pepper and Diet Mountain Dew. Play is down to once or twice per week and the level of play shows. Not fun in any way these days. Still working about three days per week, but not very hard.
 

onehandbh

Legend
Age 64. Just got bumped back up to 4.5. No local leagues in which to play, but it would mean playing on hard courts if there were, and that ain't gonna happen. Three knee surgeries (one replacement - my only "good" joint) and one shoulder surgery. Wrist is shot and had been working around it, but it's getting worse, too. Dues for tennis just went up to something like 560 per month here, so dropped that club membership and joined another clay court club about 35 minutes away. But, a large percentage of my play/hitting (six or seven days a week) has been with the little wifey, who now has back issues and can barely get out on the court. The golden years. :) Concentrating on my other hobby, underwater photography, which includes regular six hour drives. Working towards dying of gluttony. Love my Miller Lites with a squeeze of lime, but often just make very large, very weak mixes of cheap rum and diet Dr. Pepper and Diet Mountain Dew. Play is down to once or twice per week and the level of play shows. Not fun in any way these days. Still working about three days per week, but not very hard.
Wow. 3 knee surgeries. You're doing well to still be able to play at 4.5. Singles and doubles or just doubles?

What caused the knee problems? injuries? wear and tear? What tips would you give to someone to avoid or reduce knee problems and still play lots of tennis?
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
Age 64. Just got bumped back up to 4.5. No local leagues in which to play, but it would mean playing on hard courts if there were, and that ain't gonna happen. Three knee surgeries (one replacement - my only "good" joint) and one shoulder surgery. Wrist is shot and had been working around it, but it's getting worse, too. Dues for tennis just went up to something like 560 per month here, so dropped that club membership and joined another clay court club about 35 minutes away. But, a large percentage of my play/hitting (six or seven days a week) has been with the little wifey, who now has back issues and can barely get out on the court. The golden years. :) Concentrating on my other hobby, underwater photography, which includes regular six hour drives. Working towards dying of gluttony. Love my Miller Lites with a squeeze of lime, but often just make very large, very weak mixes of cheap rum and diet Dr. Pepper and Diet Mountain Dew. Play is down to once or twice per week and the level of play shows. Not fun in any way these days. Still working about three days per week, but not very hard.
64! and still 4.5. impressive.
something for me to aim for :)
 

mntlblok

Professional
Wow. 3 knee surgeries. You're doing well to still be able to play at 4.5. Singles and doubles or just doubles?

What caused the knee problems? injuries? wear and tear? What tips would you give to someone to avoid or reduce knee problems and still play lots of tennis?
Be careful what you ask for. :) Initial knee problem was something called an osteochondral defect - a dead area of bone that worsened pain-wise over the decades. First surgery was to remove the dead chunk of bone from the end of my femur and fill it in with some plaster of Paris and drill a bunch of holes in the red, bloody-looking that was the rest of the end of the femur - which is supposed to be slick and shiny like then end of a chicken leg bone - hyaline cartilage. Ultimately had that knee replaced a couple of years ago. Other knee sustained a torn meniscus that was bad enough that it wouldn't heal and I couldn't play at all - playing at the Southern Senior Hard Courts almost ten years ago. Meniscus trim surgery was pretty successful with that one. I get by with a bit of a limp with that one. No need to bother with that one further, as the fronts of both ankles hurt so much from arthritis that I can no longer run more than a few quick steps.

As for preventing the problems, the dead spot was probably congenital. But, I suspect that I might have kept the knees usable longer had I not been obsessed with trying to dunk a basketball. Must have tried thousands of times. :) *May* have been successful *once* with a really grippy, rubber coated ball outdoors on the playground of Medora Elementary School. :) Could dunk anything that I could palm - like a volley ball. Never quite made it to 5'10" in height. But, I remember seeing old video of Roy Emerson hopping up and down in place, yanking his knees up to his chin, as part of his training. Had the great pleasure of meeting that fine fellow at a "Legends Weekend" here at our club. He has *the* worst knees I've ever seen. Hmmm. . .

Only played doubles in leagues. Not sure you can call it "real" tennis, as I have to slice everything and have to get to the net immediately. Can't hit an offensive forehand volley - other than a drop volley - but can hit an overhead - possibly as good as any I've seen in senior tennis. :) But, even that seems to now be going away as the wrist is getting even worse. :-( When I play 4.0 friends in singles, they don't get many games, but real 4.5 players with some offense don't find my shenanigans overly problematic. They play me from six feet inside the baseline.

As far as playing with knee problems, clay courts *really* help. Learn to not make errors and hustle in spite of the limping. :) Drop shots are fun, especially when mixed with a bit of verbal gamesmanship and insincerity.

Kevin Bryant
Savannah
 
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D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
Be careful what you ask for. :) Initial knee problem was something called an osteochondral defect - a dead area of bone that worsened pain-wise over the decades. First surgery was to remove the dead chunk of bone from the end of my femur and fill it in with some plaster of Paris and drill a bunch of holes in the red, bloody-looking that was the rest of the end of the femur - which is supposed to be slick and shiny like then end of a chicken leg bone - hyaline cartilage. Ultimately had that knee replaced a couple of years ago. Other knee sustained a torn meniscus that was bad enough that it wouldn't heal and I couldn't play at all - playing at the Southern Senior Hard Courts almost ten years ago. Meniscus trim surgery was pretty successful with that one. I get by with a bit of a limp with that one. No need to bother with that one further, as the fronts of both ankles hurt so much from arthritis that I can no longer run more than a few quick steps.

As for preventing the problems, the dead spot was probably congenital. But, I suspect that I might have kept the knees usable longer had I not been obsessed with trying to dunk a basketball. Must have tried thousands of times. :) *May* have been successful *once* with a really grippy, rubber coated ball outdoors on the playground of Medora Elementary School. :) Could dunk anything that I could palm - like a volley ball. Never quite made it to 5'10" in height. But, I remember seeing old video of Roy Emerson hopping up and down in place, yanking his knees up to his chin, as part of his training. Had the great pleasure of meeting that fine fellow at a "Legends Weekend" here at our club. He has *the* worst knees I've ever seen. Hmmm. . .

Only played doubles in leagues. Not sure you can call it "real" tennis, as I have to slice everything and have to get to the net immediately. Can't hit an offensive forehand volley - other than a drop volley - but can hit an overhead - possibly as good as any I've seen in senior tennis. :) But, even that seems to now be going away as the wrist is getting even worse. :) When I play friends 4.0 friends in singles, they don't get many games, but real 4.5 players with some offense don't find my shenanigans overly problematic. They play me from six feet inside the baseline.

As far as playing with knee problems, clay courts *really* help. Learn to not make errors and hustle in spite of the limping. :) Drop shots are fun, especially when mixed with a bit of verbal gamesmanship and insincerity.

Kevin Bryant
Savannah
will definitely need to spend more time on clay, for longevity.
tough to stay away from the hard courts... as all the good/better (younger) players prefer it.
i prefer it too, but need to choose body over game.
 

mntlblok

Professional
will definitely need to spend more time on clay, for longevity.
tough to stay away from the hard courts... as all the good/better (younger) players prefer it.
i prefer it too, but need to choose body over game.
Am constantly amazed at how many good west coast senior players there are in *all* age groups who continue to do just fine, and have to play exclusively on hard courts. Genetics is likely more important than anything else.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
Am constantly amazed at how many good west coast senior players there are in *all* age groups who continue to do just fine, and have to play exclusively on hard courts. Genetics is likely more important than anything else.
could be game style too...
or just playing smart (high and deep, winning by placement, vs. by pure attrition)
and a dose of knowing when to let balls go
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
will definitely need to spend more time on clay, for longevity.
tough to stay away from the hard courts... as all the good/better (younger) players prefer it.
i prefer it too, but need to choose body over game.
I have exponentially dropped in match play the last few years and hate, hate, HATE to look at age as a factor, but those younger players aren't getting younger soooo....gotta face some points of reality given time and effort I can devote to tennis at the moment. Wish we had clay to slow things up a bit and give my body a break, but all we have is hard courts.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
I have exponentially dropped in match play the last few years and hate, hate, HATE to look at age as a factor, but those younger players aren't getting younger soooo....gotta face some points of reality given time and effort I can devote to tennis at the moment. Wish we had clay to slow things up a bit and give my body a break, but all we have is hard courts.
i'm with you.
i will never use age as an excuse (hated it when it was/is done to me).

what i WANT to hear,... (from 20-30 somethings) "you're HOW OLD? I though you were easily my age or a bit older." which i do get from time to time :p

that said, there are alot of things i'm not doing (better diet, restorative work, etc...) that i could be to maximize my current body.
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
i'm with you.
i will never use age as an excuse (hated it when it was/is done to me).

what i WANT to hear,... (from 20-30 somethings) "you're HOW OLD? I though you were easily my age or a bit older." which i do get from time to time :p

that said, there are alot of things i'm not doing (better diet, restorative work, etc...) that i could be to maximize my current body.
Playing with the younger folks I get "No...you move really good FOR YOUR AGE." lol. Annoying little buggers!

But yeah, even with maybe being a little slower, I know much of it is a few off injuries and being a damn desk jockey 8 hours a day, 5 days a week for the last 20+ years. Sitting is the cancer of the 2k century. I take full responsibility for NOT doing my best to maintain and work as hard as I need to. So that's 99% to do with where I am in my game, while 1% is simply being older.

I'll improve again.
 

onehandbh

Legend
As for preventing the problems, the dead spot was probably congenital. But, I suspect that I might have kept the knees usable longer had I not been obsessed with trying to dunk a basketball. Must have tried thousands of times. :) *May* have been successful *once* with a really grippy, rubber coated ball outdoors on the playground of Medora Elementary School. :)
Thank you for your detailed reply. For awhile I was mostly playing basketball instead of tennis. After a random accident from landing on someone's foot and injuring my ankle, I decided to quit playing basketball and return to tennis. I figured basketball is much harder on the body than tennis, and I'd like to be able to be active for my entire life. Never could dunk. Tried a little once but could only grab the rim with a running jump.
 
I am inspired to do better on my diet and alcohol consumption after reading these posts.
Does "better" mean more or less alcohol? I enjoy my beer too.

Age 67 here, currently playing with Donnay Borg Pro wood 4 1/2 Medium (14 oz racquet) strung with 17 gauge VS team.
Dude! Can you even buy those still? How old is that racket? Back in the day I played with wood too, but my rackets always broke at some point.

I'm 58 and back in tennis for the first time in the last 20-25 years. I've been playing a lot for nearly six months now and I'm hitting my backhand better than I ever have. My biggest problem is I've mostly been practicing with a ball machine and beating up a wall, so my footwork is off when I'm playing humans. And, since I'm 58 instead of 28, I can't cover the court like I used to. I could get better, but I bet I'm two strides slower than I was in my prime. It's a challenge to play baseline and play deep enough to handle deep balls with pace and then be able to run down the short balls. If I play on top of the baseline then the deep shots are difficult.

I'll get it figured out once I get some regular hitting partners. That isn't always easy, too. I'll never cover the court the way I used to, but I can work out a better strategy than I'm using now. It may involve more net-rushing and praying!
 
Does "better" mean more or less alcohol? I enjoy my beer too.



Dude! Can you even buy those still? How old is that racket? Back in the day I played with wood too, but my rackets always broke at some point.

I'm 58 and back in tennis for the first time in the last 20-25 years. I've been playing a lot for nearly six months now and I'm hitting my backhand better than I ever have. My biggest problem is I've mostly been practicing with a ball machine and beating up a wall, so my footwork is off when I'm playing humans. And, since I'm 58 instead of 28, I can't cover the court like I used to. I could get better, but I bet I'm two strides slower than I was in my prime. It's a challenge to play baseline and play deep enough to handle deep balls with pace and then be able to run down the short balls. If I play on top of the baseline then the deep shots are difficult.

I'll get it figured out once I get some regular hitting partners. That isn't always easy, too. I'll never cover the court the way I used to, but I can work out a better strategy than I'm using now. It may involve more net-rushing and praying!
Shortening the points is one of the smartest things good senior players must learn to do!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

nvr2old

Professional
Be careful what you ask for. :) Initial knee problem was something called an osteochondral defect - a dead area of bone that worsened pain-wise over the decades. First surgery was to remove the dead chunk of bone from the end of my femur and fill it in with some plaster of Paris and drill a bunch of holes in the red, bloody-looking that was the rest of the end of the femur - which is supposed to be slick and shiny like then end of a chicken leg bone - hyaline cartilage. Ultimately had that knee replaced a couple of years ago. Other knee sustained a torn meniscus that was bad enough that it wouldn't heal and I couldn't play at all - playing at the Southern Senior Hard Courts almost ten years ago. Meniscus trim surgery was pretty successful with that one. I get by with a bit of a limp with that one. No need to bother with that one further, as the fronts of both ankles hurt so much from arthritis that I can no longer run more than a few quick steps.

As for preventing the problems, the dead spot was probably congenital. But, I suspect that I might have kept the knees usable longer had I not been obsessed with trying to dunk a basketball. Must have tried thousands of times. :) *May* have been successful *once* with a really grippy, rubber coated ball outdoors on the playground of Medora Elementary School. :) Could dunk anything that I could palm - like a volley ball. Never quite made it to 5'10" in height. But, I remember seeing old video of Roy Emerson hopping up and down in place, yanking his knees up to his chin, as part of his training. Had the great pleasure of meeting that fine fellow at a "Legends Weekend" here at our club. He has *the* worst knees I've ever seen. Hmmm. . .

Only played doubles in leagues. Not sure you can call it "real" tennis, as I have to slice everything and have to get to the net immediately. Can't hit an offensive forehand volley - other than a drop volley - but can hit an overhead - possibly as good as any I've seen in senior tennis. :) But, even that seems to now be going away as the wrist is getting even worse. :-( When I play 4.0 friends in singles, they don't get many games, but real 4.5 players with some offense don't find my shenanigans overly problematic. They play me from six feet inside the baseline.

As far as playing with knee problems, clay courts *really* help. Learn to not make errors and hustle in spite of the limping. :) Drop shots are fun, especially when mixed with a bit of verbal gamesmanship and insincerity.

Kevin Bryant
Savannah
Well my left knee has really been bothering me since playing last weekend with my wife and also hitting with my ball machine. I originally ruptured my PCL playing baseball about 40 years ago. Didn't have it repaired because at the time it was a huge surgery with no guarantee it would help. Needed to have meniscus trimmed about 35 years ago in that knee due to locking on me. It's been fine ever since although it's always been a bit loose due to no PCL. Been able to snow ski, race motocross, play golf, and ride bikes without problems. I was told that eventually it would hurt due to the trimming of the meniscus and eventual arthritis. Fast forward to this week and it's swollen and stiff and very difficult to walk. I think time has finally caught up with me and the knee. Gonna rest for several days and see if it calms down but not looking forward to not hitting. May try to practice serving but even that motion hurts when I've tried to practice it.
 
Well my left knee has really been bothering me since playing last weekend with my wife and also hitting with my ball machine. I originally ruptured my PCL playing baseball about 40 years ago. Didn't have it repaired because at the time it was a huge surgery with no guarantee it would help. Needed to have meniscus trimmed about 35 years ago in that knee due to locking on me. It's been fine ever since although it's always been a bit loose due to no PCL. Been able to snow ski, race motocross, play golf, and ride bikes without problems. I was told that eventually it would hurt due to the trimming of the meniscus and eventual arthritis. Fast forward to this week and it's swollen and stiff and very difficult to walk. I think time has finally caught up with me and the knee. Gonna rest for several days and see if it calms down but not looking forward to not hitting. May try to practice serving but even that motion hurts when I've tried to practice it.
Three words: six weeks rest. Best, BHBH


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mntlblok

Professional
Well my left knee has really been bothering me since playing last weekend with my wife and also hitting with my ball machine. I originally ruptured my PCL playing baseball about 40 years ago. Didn't have it repaired because at the time it was a huge surgery with no guarantee it would help. Needed to have meniscus trimmed about 35 years ago in that knee due to locking on me. It's been fine ever since although it's always been a bit loose due to no PCL. Been able to snow ski, race motocross, play golf, and ride bikes without problems. I was told that eventually it would hurt due to the trimming of the meniscus and eventual arthritis. Fast forward to this week and it's swollen and stiff and very difficult to walk. I think time has finally caught up with me and the knee. Gonna rest for several days and see if it calms down but not looking forward to not hitting. May try to practice serving but even that motion hurts when I've tried to practice it.
A little rod fits into a slot with knee replacement that does away with the need for PCLs and ACLs. And, you get a nice "metal on really hard plastic" instead of "bone on bone". Highly recommended. :)

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