Serve consistency...racking my brain could use some help

r2473

G.O.A.T.
Ask yourself whether the most basic characteristics - of the only thing that makes muscles move, the sarcomere - might possibly be important for a tennis stroke?
Ask yourself this. Does Tom Brady work out the detailed physics and biomechanics to enable him to (efficiently and effectively) throw the football into a small window at just the right time with just the right speed and arc?

Who is the better quarterback (or even thrower of the football)? The PhD who can explain the biomechanics and physics involved in throwing a football or Tom Brady, who can barely write his name in the dirt with a stick (just kidding Tom)?

As I said, knowing "the most basic characteristics" is obviously important for you and your ability to execute (the serve). But for many of us, it isn't. That doesn't make one approach right and the other wrong. It just means that we learn in different ways.
 

Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
................ I always think of ISR as an "effect" of proper mechanics, not the cause of proper mechanics. ..........
.............................

If anyone on the forum has said that ISR was the "cause" of "proper mechanics" please quote the post.

I sometimes have internal arguments with myself and then suddenly realize that I have unknowingly created a strawman. Again! I'm trying to stop.....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straw_man
"A straw man is a common form of argument and is an informal fallacy based on giving the impression of refuting an opponent's argument, while actually refuting an argument that was not advanced by that opponent."

My last comment on off topic subjects.....
 
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r2473

G.O.A.T.
If anyone on the forum has said that ISR was the "cause" of "proper mechanics" please quote the post.

I sometimes have internal arguments with myself and then suddenly realize that I have unknowingly created a strawman. Again! I'm trying to stop.....

Wikipedia -
"A straw man is a common form of argument and is an informal fallacy based on giving the impression of refuting an opponent's argument, while actually refuting an argument that was not advanced by that opponent."

My last comment on off topic subjects.....
Apologies. I didn't mean to suggest you had said this.

I realize that you look for ISR as a useful thing to check when evaluating a serve. Lack of ISR indicates fundamental problems with the (serve) technique (which is 100% true). But identifying this doesn't identify what the fundamental problem is (though, you almost always, do go onto point out the fundamental problem(s)).

I like your analysis. It's usually very good (though I do gloss over the discussions of Actin & Myosin forces, for reasons I've explained).
 
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mbm0912

Hall of Fame
Ask yourself this. Does Tom Brady work out the detailed physics and biomechanics to enable him to (efficiently and effectively) throw the football into a small window at just the right time with just the right speed and arc?

Who is the better quarterback (or even thrower of the football)? The PhD who can explain the biomechanics and physics involved in throwing a football or Tom Brady, who can barely write his name in the dirt with a stick (just kidding Tom)?

As I said, knowing "the most basic characteristics" is obviously important for you and your ability to execute (the serve). But for many of us, it isn't. That doesn't make one approach right and the other wrong. It just means that we learn in different ways.
He keeps a printed screenshot of Chas' ISR literature on his arm at all times.
1863yupb1rf0ojpg.jpg
 

r2473

G.O.A.T.
Here's how it's done in 2016.
https://www.wired.com/2015/10/baseball-building-better-nfl-quarterbacks/

Baseball pitching is probably leading the way because of injury issues and available funding.
This makes sense to me.

Weight transfer is the key. Once you figure that out, many other things will happen automatically.

Weight transfer and balance are the foundation to so many sports and sports movements. And not just throwing and swinging. It is the foundation for skiing too

Most people will never be good/efficient with these movements because they don't take the time to build a solid foundation. Instead, they spend their time focusing on details, always trying to find a magic tweak to compensate for their poor base fundamentals. It won't work.
 
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shindemac

Hall of Fame
Balance is really important and unfortunately, often overlooked. It's often thought that balance is only needed for things like snowboarding, gymnastics, ballet, and tight-rope walking, etc., so guys ignore it. I've seen time and time again guys say if i'm not falling over, what does it matter. It's sad when you hear rec players saying that, and then you have a college-level player asking about how their balance is on their shots.

True dat. It's always about the magic cure and the more exotic it is. No one wants to hear about fundamentals, cause i guess it's boring or they don't want to put in the work.

Most rec players and even coaches don't have good balance, so it isn't something easy to see or prove (that it's worthwhile). But if you have good balance, then it's very easy to see when someone is off-balance because your brain has been trained. Some players post videos and are basically swaying like a buoy on the high seas, and not one person mentions it. It gets me dizzy watching it and I almost fear they're gonna fall over (meaning it's something i don't think about).

For concreteness, I was watching a video on the sprinting technique of Usain Bolt, and another former gold medalist was mentioning how balance was crucial to generating more power. Simple things like upright torso and relaxed upper body, just like in tennis. (usually throwing motion in football or baseball is used for comparison). Fundamental, meaning it's a foundation that's used in all sports. (in this case, there are 2 fundamentals: balance and relaxed body)

So yeah, elite athletes are talking about balance. There's an expression i've heard that fits here: "Beginners want to take intermediate classes. Intermediates want to take advanced classes. And what do advanced students want to take? They want to beginner classes."
 
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