Service tip: make your back hollow

I was struggling with my serve. Hadn't a clue what the reason was until I found out I was shrinking forward with my upperboddy. So now I do the opposite: when serving I make arch my back hollow. Works really well for my 1st serve.
 
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Goof

Semi-Pro
I'm not sure what that means. Are you saying to arch your back at some point before swinging up? Or something else?
 

Cawlin

Semi-Pro
I was struggling with my serve. Hadn't a clue what the reason was until I found out I was shrinking forward with my upperboddy. So now I do the opposite: when serving I make my back hollow. Works really well for my 1st serve.
This makes sense, and I suspect that a lot of folks get this tip in various different types of wording... e.g.: Hold your tossing shoulder high and extend straight upwards.

It's all about achieving maximum contact position height and therefore maximizing power and still clearing the net.
 
....................Hold your tossing shoulder high and extend straight upwards.

It's all about achieving maximum contact position height and therefore maximizing power and still clearing the net.
If you want to achieve "maximum contact position height" then every part of your body should be vertical (and that means as seen from all directions).

If you will look at a single picture of a high level serve you will see many angles that are not vertical. Maybe nothing is vertical...?

That is a false belief but a few people actually try to do it.
 

Cawlin

Semi-Pro
If you want to achieve "maximum contact position height" then every part of your body should be vertical (and that means as seen from all directions).

If you will look at a single picture of a high level serve you will see many angles that are not vertical. Maybe nothing is vertical...?

That is a false belief but a few people actually try to do it.
Well the point is that you won't have max power or optimal contact position for serving if your shoulders are hunched over...

The thing is that lots of key things about various mechanics are described to students in many different ways by different coaches - but they're all describing the same sort of thing, just in different terms - if your back is somewhat arched, it's nearly impossible to have your shoulders hunched over... if you're holding your tossing arm high, it's nearly impossible to have your shoulders hunched over, etc.

This isn't really all that technical, and there's no need to overthink it... if you understand the body positions being spoken about, you can see that there are probably half a dozen ways to describe it... for some students one way of describing it will click, for others, a different way will click...
 
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LeeD

Bionic Poster
Arched back can lead to stronger ab crunch which leads to stronger serves which can cause back problems in the long run.
 
For Thoracic Extension see dominickk1985 posts in this thread.

ISR:
frontal Deltoid, pectoralis and lattismus dorsi mostly

pronation:
mostly pronator muscles of the forearm

BTW to get a good ISR you Need to get a good ESR first. The dynamic ESR will cause a Stretch shortening cycle in the IR muscles. Also to get good Maximum racket drop you Need to couple ESR with Extension of the thoracic spine.

https://wassermanstrength.com/high-level-throwing-dont-force-thoracic-extension/

try for yourself. first get racket drop only by ESR but a neutral spine. then couple ESR with thoracic spine Extension (draw the scapula back and "puff the chest"). That thoracic Extension (and ESR) Needs to be increasing dynamically as the hips drive.

See dominick1985's posts in this thread.

From high speed videos, I believe that this is the reality of the misleading advice to 'face your chest up on the serve'. The special brief timing and the reason for this motion are both completely left out of the advice.
 
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sureshs

Bionic Poster
For Thoracic Extension see dominickk1985 posts in this thread.



See dominick1985's posts in this thread.

From high speed videos, I believe that this is the reality of the misleading advice to 'face your chest up on the serve'. The timing is special as well as the reason for this motion and both are completely left out of the advice.
So is the advice right or wrong? Short answer only please.
 
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