Set in ways and self taught - hopeless?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by saltyzoo, Sep 22, 2004.

  1. saltyzoo

    saltyzoo New User

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    I'm a 3.0 player that has come in and out of the sport over the last 20 years. I've had no training at all and have a very unique style. I don't think my style is that far from the norm, but it's definitely just what feels right to me and nothing more. The problem is I basically haven't improved in 20 years.... I'm playing the same game (other than better consistency) than I did 20 years ago (with less energy) ;)

    Will lessons do me any good at all considering that I've done things the way I have for so long?

    PS> Very nice forum. I've enjoyed reading so far!
     
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  2. thehustler

    thehustler Rookie

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    It depends. Do you want to get better or do you want to stay at the 3.0 level? Personally I'm at the 4.0 level after playing for little over a year and my goal is to be at the 5.0 level within a year or two. Best thing to do is set a goal for yourself and make sure you can reach your goal. I had a few private lessons and the rest is self taught, I'm sure I can improve on things and when I have the money I will take lessons again, but I figure I'm doing good for only playing for one year. If you want to get better you will. It all comes down to what do you want and how far are you willing to go. Good luck.
     
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  3. skuludo

    skuludo Professional

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    Whether you have a coach or not, each time you set foot on the court you need to have a purpose. Ask yourself how are you going to get to the next level? Do you need a better forehand, backhand, serve, volley, smash, topspin serve, etc? Then ask yourself what you arn't doing in your forehand or any other strokes. If you know what you lack in your strokes you can work on them. You do the exact same thing when you play a set as well.
     
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  4. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    4.0 level after only a year? Holy Cow! 5.0 level within a year or two? Either you have some relaxed standards where you are from or you might be the next Sampras!

    Think you can be a 7.0 within two years? :)

    Man, do I feel lousey. It toook me several years to reach the 5.0 mark. And another several years to get to college!
     
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  5. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Saltyzoo,

    You cant be in and out of the sport and expect to improve. It takes a lot of hard work and dedication to start improving. A coach will help as well as the good books that are out there. But the bottom-line is you have to want to get better and be disiplined enough to be consistently executing your practice sessions, eating right, working out to stay in shape if you want to improve and reach your goals.

    You just have to make up your mind what do you want to be in this sport.
     
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  6. thehustler

    thehustler Rookie

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    BB,

    I hope it's not some relaxed standards around here. I've hit with some guys who are 4.5 - 5.0 and they all say I can easily play at the 4.0 level. I just push myself a lot harder than other people do. I practice when I can, I watch tennis on tv and I come to this board to see what people say. I make sure to repeat something over and over until I get it right before I move on to something else. I still have a lot to learn, but I'm happy with where I am at now. I'd love to be 5.0 within a year or two, hopefully that can happen. 7.0 would be nice and if I had the money for a good coach and so on I'd probably go for it. I figure I've only got one shot at life and I'd rather go for it while I'm young, rather than regretting what could've been when I'm older. I actually don't think it's that hard to do what I've done. It just depends on how bad you want something and what you're willing to do. Now if I took some of that advice you gave, eating right, working out, etc, who knows where I could be.
     
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  7. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    I true 5.0 player is a very accomplished player. They possess all the strokes and can draw up a game plan to help them beat their opponent.

    I have been to clubs where it seemed everyone was a 5.0 player. Even the women were calling themselves 5.0 players and that they were on the "womens" NTRP ratings. I didnt know there was such a thing. Is there?

    Nevertheless these tireless and determined "dinkers" considered themselves 5.0 players only because they could keep the ball in the air, high in the air mind you but in the air. They never considered that they had poor positioning most of the time, lousey backhands, soft forehands, awkward volley positions and had little clue how to play doubles or run plays.

    But they were 5.0. :)
     
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  8. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Well right there tells me you might not be as good as you think. The term "practice when you can" strikes me as odd. For me, it took a lot of practice to reach a true 5.0 level. I got up at 5am, and started my non-racquet court drills, then did weights and/or other exercises. Went to school, then after school drilled for 2 hours, then played matches for another 2 hours. If I wasnt working out in the morning I was drilling with my doubles partner. It took quite a bit of time to become a true 5.0 player.

    For a person that is rising that fast you should be eating right and doing all the right things NOW! A coach would certainly speed things up but to grow that quick without a coach leads me to say again - you either have some very relaxed standards or you are truly the next Sampras. I would highly suggest you tape yourself and send it to Bolliterri Academy and see if they can take you in as their future star. You can complete your high school education at the academy and get loads of tennis in to become a professional tennis player (7.0).

    Tennis and golf have been rated (I forget the source) two of the toughest sports to learn. And if it comes that easy to you - well, we might be seeing you on TV.
     
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  9. thehustler

    thehustler Rookie

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    BB,

    Well I practice when I can because my work takes up a lot of my time. There are some days where I can practice for several hours, and other days where I can only get an hour in. The weather over here has been good recently, but when it is the courts that have lights get full in a hurry. Usually I play a match or two a day and after a while I assess where I'm at and what I need and want to work on to get better. I then practice as often as I can working on exactly what I need to fix until I get it right. Then I use what I've learned in a match and see if it still needs improvement or if I'm happy with where I'm at for the moment.

    Well I do eat 'right' per se, I mean I do eat some junk food once in a while, but I'm not to worried about everything. I have a high metabolism, and yes I know that will slow down one day and I am working on eating better. Once again I don't have relaxed standards, I've been told by far better players what level I'm at and I trust their opinion as I've seen what they can do on a court.

    I may not have the best strokes as someone else, but the thing that separates me from most of my opponents is that I always have a plan for everything. I've read the ratings and 4.5 and above should have a gameplan for each opponent. I tend to scout each opponent as well as I can so I know exactly what to attack when we play. Most players around here don't seem to do that, and too many will tell me exactly what's weak about their play. I'd honestly love to travel around and play other players at my level to see if there are so called 'relaxed standards' out here, but I don't have the time or money to do so.

    As far as tennis being a tough sport to learn I believe it. I grew up on basketball and that will always come first to me. But to me sports seem easy to learn. You just have to want to learn and have to know how far you want to go. Once you know how far you want to go you need to know what to do in order to get to that point. I know I need to work on several things a lot more to get to the 5.0 level and I will work on them in time as I continue to develop my game. Now if someone would gladly pay all my bills for a year or two I'll spend all day at the courts working on my game. But until then I'll practice when I can.
     
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  10. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Well it sounds like you are very athletic and dedicated. I find that extremely respectable. At 5.0, you go to have the strokes and the game plan to go along with it.

    I appreciate your determination, goal setting, game plan breakdowns, and enthusiasm, but when the rubber meets the road, your either truly a 4.0 player or your not. People can watch tennis, play for a couple of hours, have determination and will still not at the leve of play they "say" they are. I am not saying you aren't. In fact, I am starting to think you might be!

    It is funny that you said,
    .

    Right when I read that I just got through eating a Heath Toffee Chocolate bar and was pounding down a Kit Kat bar (white chocolate version)!

    I am working out with a new workout program fromm my friend that was intense this morning. It was a leg workout and for some reason I got extremely hungry several hours later. Looking for something good around here, I couldnt find anything, but noticed those two candy bars (maybe three, but who is counting!). I will have to say sorry to the kids later. :twisted:

    Anyway, I believe you, just keep working toward your goal. Being a working person, 7.0 may be a bit unrealistic. The highest I got was 6.0 and that took an intense amount of work and I wasn't really working a real job.

    Now, since I dont play that much anymore, I have fallen back to about a 5.0 player 5.5 when I am in tennis shape. But I play for fun now, as my days of spending large amounts of energy trying to "get" good are behind me now.

    I played a 4.0 player last night who had a very good forehand. I wanted to get a good workout so I hit 85% of my balls to his forehand and kept the ball close to him (he didnt have good movement) till after the fifth or so ball, then I tried to go to his weakness and or run him to open the court.

    It was fun, he held his own very well. We mostly we played 21.
     
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  11. degreefanlindi

    degreefanlindi Rookie

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    Habits

    I think you CAN change your playing habits if you really try and that's something you strive for. There isn't any reason why athletes should be set in a standard way of playing. After all, coaching is all about improving, right? So sometimes, with the right coach, you may be able to hone your skills, concentrate on new things or even change a major aspect of your game to make it work in a different way. So do not give up and keep trying new things until something works.
     
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  12. thehustler

    thehustler Rookie

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    BB,

    Thanks. My main thing right now that I'm working on is keeping my head still. Since I've been working on that my strokes are cleaner, I hit with more power and I can put the ball anywhere I want. I figure once I get that down cold I'll refine my strokes however I can. I'm now adding a 1hbh, which has been tricky but I'm getting used to it.

    My biggest weapon is my speed. I can get to about any ball that is hit, and if you don't place it right I'm going to get it back and do something with it. I find that when I do this I demoralize so many people that I can just have my way with them. I don't expect to be a 7.0, as I'm too old to get there, I'm only 26, but in sports that's not a good time to be a rookie.

    The hardest thing for me around here is to find someone who is a challenge. Too often I find players who are '3.5-4.0' and I just find something about them and exploit it. I'm not trying to brag, but it is hard to find people around here who are really good. A lot of players that I see are ones who buy pre-strung rackets and just hopelessly swing at the ball or are just major pushers who are just no fun to play against. Occasionally I find a good player, but I never get to play them often enough and it just sucks.

    I do know what you mean though by people thinking they're something they're not. I once belonged to a club here and a lot of the guys were '4.0'. I thought to myself well if you're 4.0 and I beat you with ease then what am I? This was when I was still starting to figure out my game. I think there it was more for social status than anything which is why I left that place.

    I will keep working towards my goal. I'd love to be a coach one day if I so desire, but more just work with mentality, how to stay in a game when you're down, how to demoralize your opponent and so on. The stuff nobody ever talks about or thinks about.

    I like your story at the end. I try to do that to my opponents. Get them going one way and wham throw a curve ball and throw them out of their comfort zone. I try to explain this to my friends but they don't seem to understand or don't want to learn. I guess I'll have to refer them to this board for your advice so they can learn something.
     
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  13. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    The mental game is all about strategic matchups going into the game, changing them and recognizing when to change them in the middle of the game, and analyzing the stats after the game.

    Execution is a whole different story that involves, footwork, footspeed, balance, stamina, conditioning, confidence, determination, technique, risk, playing defensively and or offensively.

    The USPTA is always looking for dedicated and talented coaches, you might want to give them a call sometime.

    You will get it.
     
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  14. saltyzoo

    saltyzoo New User

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    I realize that. When I say in and out I mean that I've periodically taken a year or two off. I've played once a week at least half those 20 years.

    Don't confuse my post for complaining that I haven't improved. I realize why I haven't. I'm just wondering if coaching is really going to make any difference now that I'm so set in my ways. I totally understand that getting out there and playing is the most important part.
     
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  15. Illegal_edge

    Illegal_edge New User

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    I think I am in the same boat as thehustler. I did pick a racquet until two years ago but I am at a 4.5 level rated NTPR. Although on my scale I am a 20.5. J/K. I play everyday and have the privilege of using an indoor court in the winter.
     
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  16. Trey

    Trey Rookie

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    to the orginal poster you can definitely improve even after 20 years with lessons if you want to.

    lessons help me tremendously because it is very difficult to see what you are doing wrong unless someobody who knows what they are doing points it out to you. Of course you have to practice what you learn or else you won't progress.

    My biggest problem is time and money. I can only play twice a week because of my job and family. If I use one time for lessons and the other for playing a match I have no time to practice :x
     
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  17. saltyzoo

    saltyzoo New User

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    I also have time constraint issues, but more than that I'm having trouble finding people to practice with regularly.
     
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  18. Kaptain Karl

    Kaptain Karl Hall Of Fame

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    saltyzoo - A few lessons with a seasoned pro might help. (Really; I mean a pro who is (say) late-30’s or older. The younger pros tend to try to make every student’s strokes just like every other’s.)

    An experienced teaching pro will be able to identify if the “critical components” of your unorthodox style will “serve you” or not. He/she will be able to make recommendations of how to fix those elements which need fixing ... and leave alone those elements which may not really be hurting your game.

    - KK
     
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  19. saltyzoo

    saltyzoo New User

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    Good points. Thanks!
     
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  20. perfmode

    perfmode Hall of Fame

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    Do you play in open or 5.0 leagues or do people just tell you that you are a 5.0? Are you self rated or have you actually played tournaments?

    A 5.0 player should be able to beat a solid 4.0 player @ love and the 4.0 player shouldn't get more than 1 point per game.
     
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  21. splink779

    splink779 Guest

    Improvment is very possible when self-taught. I became obsessed with tennis about 2 months ago and had never played before then. I watched a lot of pro tennis and payed attention, and now I am a 4.0 player. It's jsut knowing what to do, and then doing it.
     
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  22. Trey

    Trey Rookie

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    No offense, but I have never met anybody who could make it from complete beginner to a 4.0 in TWO months!
     
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  23. Chanchai

    Chanchai Semi-Pro

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    Commenting on the discussion between BB and theHustler.

    I do think that in much of Oregon (at least in both Corvallis and Portland), the "considered" level of play is a bit inflated. Not to poke a hole in your boat hustler, I have no idea what level you really are at and you could be right. But after travelling a bit, I feel that in tennis heavy areas like California (I mean really heavy, because I'll admit that areas like Beaverton are heavy in themselves), the standard is a bit different and in a sense, more accurate with expectations. Our 4.0 level players, in my mind, look like 3.5s out of Southern California.

    I guess the system is also fairly dynamic.

    I consider myself a 3.5 while a lot of the 4.0 and 4.5 opponents have said I have the game of a 4.5 but lack the consistency (and footwork) so I'm knocking on the door of a 4.0, and yet they also like to imply that I could be a 5.0 myself very soon if I was fitter. I've only been playing two years, but I know I have my work cut out for me just to be able to play stronger opponents.

    Hard to tell flattery from impression sometimes. But I'll admit it's pleasant if there's a shocked impression. But the goal is not to be complacently happy, it's to improve (and be happy) :) And enjoy of course!

    That said... at least on the standards around here. There is a lot of mix between 3.5 and 4.0 here. There are a lot of supposedly 4.0 level players playing in the 3.5s because either they feel that they really are 3.5 or because they have better odds in the 3.5 brackets. There are a lot of players who are 3.5 level that play in the 4.0 either to improve or because it's a good boost to their ego. The 3.5-4.0 level is a funny area in my experience, but that's where I'm at... 3.5 anyways.

    But at the same time... in the end... it's like something others have said (I think BB as well). If you can compete consistently with the advanced players, win some and lose some, despite your technique (even if it's lousy)--you belong up there.

    But in all honesty... I guess I have a vision of how I want my game to grow, and I work towards that. The ratings aren't really a goal of mine, but I'll be happy with each step forward I make, but I'm certainly not chasing 4.5 or 5.0 or whatever. I'm just trying to improve as best I can and the rating (in theory) should tell me how I'm putting it together in serious match play.

    With all respect to adequate pushers or awkward looking strokes that are at the 4.5 level. I respect where they are and I consider their game legit. But I just don't want to walk down that specific direction in game, so I'll go by my own ideas. Even if my ratings progress is a bit slower than it could be. But that's me, and maybe simply just my pride :)

    -Chanchai

    PS Hustler, simply for fun and hitting around. I'd love to hit the ball around sometime whenever I'm in town. If you're interested, please email me or contact me. No egos, just fun hitting and chatting :) We can also enjoy our improvements. Yours in one year, my improvements in two years.
     
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  24. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

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    Saltyzoo - BB gave you some good advice. I see you have time constraints. My advice is this:
    1. Decide if you can set aside 3X a week for at least an hour to tennis for 3 months. If you can't, quit tennis and try another hobby or pursuit you have time for.
    2. Okay, you can! Get into good physical shape. Then, get a coach over 30 and take about a dozen 1 hour lessons. Play and/or practice at least twice a week during this period of time. This is very critical to do during the time you are being coached. You will ingrain what you are being taught and if you are doing some things wrong the coach can correct them early. After this time, assess how you have improved and if you think it is worth it to you. Then go out there and hustle people to play with. Your coach may have other students you can play. Join a league or a club. And try to play twice a week to maintain your abilities. Down the road, hire a coach every now and them to "tweak" your game or to spot bad habits. Good luck to you.
     
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  25. saltyzoo

    saltyzoo New User

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    Man, you guys are hard core. I'm not going to quit playing tennis just because I haven't improved and I'm not going to quit just because I can't play more than once or twice a week either.

    I play tennis for the exercise and the enjoyment of the game not so I can say I reached x.0 in y years. I couldn't care less what level I'm at as long as I'm having fun and staying fit.

    I'm not expressing frustration. I'm just wondering if it's a waste of time to get coaching since I'm so set in my patterns.

    My biggest concern is that I'll make my game worse trying to do something different and "thinking" too much about what I'm doing.

    I think the advice on getting an older coach that won't try to start over with me is a good idea.
     
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  26. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Sounds like you are at my level. I can't find players to beat me either as I am like 32-5 against 3.5-4.0 level players this year. The 4.5s and 5.0s are off teaching tennis at the clubs and don't have time for casual matches. I am also in very good shape and get to most every ball, but could lose another 10-15 pounds if I was really serious. At 34, my only goals now are to get a 4.5 rating within 2-3 years and maybe start playing 35s and get ranked in the top 10 in the state in my age division.

    Good luck to the Hustler and come play me sometime.
     
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  27. SunDog

    SunDog Rookie

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    Greg,

    I think that it comes down to a choice of getting better OR remaining set in your ways. It is tough to have both - eating your cake and having it too, so to speak.

    I have been playing actively since about 2001 when I was a verified 3.0. Each season, I always play at my rated level and one level above. At the end of last year I finally got bumped to 3.5. This year I won all my 3.5 matches (except for one at the state tourney) and a decent amount of my 4.0 matches.

    My 3.5 team has won the city championship in Knoxville for the last 7 years running (predating my time with them) and has won 9 of the last 12 city titles. That team is full of a bunch of guys that for the most part have very unconventional strokes that they are "set in their ways" about. The majority of them do not have the least bit interest in developing their game by adopting more conventional strokes. Those fellows will be 3.5 forever. They will be successful 3.5s - but that is it.

    My goal is 4.0 before I am 40 (I turn 39 in November). I would not begin to think that I could rise to 4.0 by using the same lame backhand technique that I used when I was verified as a 3.0. Even though this year my backhand was very effective on the 3.5 front - it was suspect in 4.0 land. So I went to a pro and he is now in the process of rebuilding my backhand. And even though it sucks right at this particular momemt in history - I know that if I work hard at it, I will be a better player in the long run with the proper technique.

    My advice is to throw off the shackles of the comfort zone and get unset in your ways if you truely want to improve. Who cares if you go through a brief period where you are struggling? If you make an honest attempt at one aspect at a time, and you get to the point where you think that you are never going to get it, nothing will be stopping you from going back to your old strokes.

    I think that any coach that does not demand that you make an attempt at proper technique (assuming you are physically able to perform said technique) is just interested in liberating you from your money.

    Good luck.
     
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  28. saltyzoo

    saltyzoo New User

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    Good points SunDog.

    But, I don't think you have any idea how ingrained a style can be after using it for 20 years. A 3 year old bad habit is a LOT easier to break than a 20 year bad habit. ;)

    I guess if I can find somebody that will help me work on one thing at a time it shouldn't hurt that badly.
     
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  29. SunDog

    SunDog Rookie

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    That is the spirit! Let us know how you fare.
     
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  30. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    I bet you're very good for a beginner, but I'd also bet you're not a 4.0 yet.
     
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  31. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    3.0 or 3.5 but not 4.0 out of the gate! Sorry Charlie.
     
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  32. splink779

    splink779 Guest

    I know it sounds like a buch of hot air, but I promise I am 4.0. I don't really care if you believe me because the people I play do.
     
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  33. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    I played a guy who was a league playing 4.0 player and had been playing for12 years. I beat him, but I still don't think I'm a 4.0 and I had only 9 months of experience at the time. Go to a professional and let him evaluate you, you'll find your true rating that way.
     
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  34. splink779

    splink779 Guest

    So then what do you, the people on the board, consider to be qualifications for a 4.0 player? I'm using the NTRP guide.
     
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  35. SunDog

    SunDog Rookie

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    The NTRP guide is a nice starting place. Bottom line is that you are what you play (and compete well at). Keep in mind that the computer ratings (for what they are worth) flow down from the USTA national championships. So for the purposes of discussion, if you play organized tennis vs computer rated 4.0 folks and you compete well against them - then you are likely a 4.0 player. If you get blown out or trounce them then move down or up. If you are not competing in tournaments or leagues with other computer rated players then your rating is moot because it cannot be validated.
     
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  36. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Well for most people coaching is about an hour a week unless you can afford more time with a coach. After that hour is over it still boils down to you. You can get some great advice, fix some hitches, and realize things that became habit but isnt helping you improve.

    If you work hard after your coaching you will improve. If you work hard and setup practices to cover the things you're learning after you were coached - you will improve.

    It is really up to you. I didnt think you were complaining and I thought you were very honest about your assessment of yourself. That is a good starting point. However, you can still improve on your own if you have a video camera and some good information to help you evaluate yourself with.

    At first, I had to improve without coaching. Once I got to college level play, I had a "coach". This really helped me improve at a faster rate because I was a self-studier in tennis. So you can do it without a coach, you just have to learn how to be your own coach. Not many people can do that and be objective at the same time.
     
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  37. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Don't worry too much about the number. Play a bunch of different people and see how well you do. Playing the same circle of friends will hold you back and you won't find your true rating that way.
     
    #37
  38. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,883
    If your talking to me I just threw a coin up in the air to see if it was heads or tails. If it was tails I was a 5.0 player. If it was heads, I wasnt a 5.0 player and could be anywhere from a 2.0 to a 3.5 player.

    The next thing I did was watched the pros. If I could imitate a forehand stroke in my living room I was a 5.0 player. If I accidently hit a lamp or knocked down something with my swing I was anywhere from a 2.0 to a 3.5 player.
     
    #38
  39. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    1,823
    Saltyzoo - You'd be wasting your money on a coach, a good one is going to try to get you to change your ways. You are right, a lot of us are hard core and a lot of our advice probably does not pertain to your case. Just hitting the ball around with your friends and enjoying it beats the heck out of sitting on your couch, so enjoy it and don't worry about improving a lot. Improving in tennis is an enormous investment of time and sometimes money, too.
     
    #39
  40. splink779

    splink779 Guest

    I've been playing a lot of different people lately, thats exactly why I think of myself as a 4. I actually don't play that often with my friends anymore because they don't like me beating them.
     
    #40
  41. vin

    vin Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,296
    Saltyzoo, or should I say gregt,

    How's you're reef doing? :wink:

    Cool to see you're a tennis player too.
     
    #41
  42. saltyzoo

    saltyzoo New User

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2004
    Messages:
    26
    Hey there vin. Tank is well. What's your id on the reef boards?
     
    #42
  43. vin

    vin Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,296
    vmiller on reefcentral and rdo. I bought one of the monster UV DIY kits from you just over a year ago. Just emailed you about it a few weeks ago too.
     
    #43
  44. saltyzoo

    saltyzoo New User

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2004
    Messages:
    26
    I thought it was you, but wasn't sure. You did get my response, right?
     
    #44
  45. vin

    vin Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,296
    Yes. Just to be safe I think I am going to paint it when I change the bulb, which will be soon. Do you know anywhere to get the replacement bulbs for cheaper than $110?

    I bet you didn't think you'd be talking about reefing on a tennis board. :D
     
    #45
  46. saltyzoo

    saltyzoo New User

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2004
    Messages:
    26
    I can get the bulb for you cheaper than that.
     
    #46
  47. ferreira

    ferreira Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2004
    Messages:
    129
    I'm relieved to know that there are other mortals on the board!
    It may not apply to all, but doesn't it take an average amateur adult, with considerable dedication, between 7 to 10 years to reach a solid 5.0?
     
    #47
  48. ferreira

    ferreira Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2004
    Messages:
    129
    Perfmode, is that really more or less the norm?
    I'd be happy to know if it is so, because I've managed to average about 1.5 games per set , against my 5.0 partner. But double bagles do show quite frequently.
     
    #48
  49. ferreira

    ferreira Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2004
    Messages:
    129
    Folks,
    do take a look at this section of the ITF website. It gives very detailed explanation for each of 10 levels. There is a section that relates to ratings used in other countries, among which NTRP (USA).
    www.internationaltennisnumber.com
     
    #49
  50. saltyzoo

    saltyzoo New User

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2004
    Messages:
    26
    Thanks everyone for your input. I'm planning on getting some coaching and seeing where it goes.

    In the meanwhile my first league match in almost two years was tonight. And I won 6-3 6-2. :D
     
    #50

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