Shadow Swinging with wrist weight

hyperthom007

New User
Hi guys, I have thought of this for awhile. Its possible to wear some wrist weights and do some swinging. So what I was thinking was if I do this quite often, will it increase my swing speed? Or will I be risking injury?
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Not a good idea. Possible injury to the arm and it may train your muscle fibers to swing slower rather than faster. I've posted a Sports Science video on this subject in quite a few previous threads.

You might Overload-Underload Training, but this may be difficult to implement. Try shadow swinging a racket that is no more than 10-15% heavier (or 10-15% greater swingweight) than you normal playing racket. (This may tend to throw off your timing a bit). Follow this up with the Underload phase -- shadow swing with a racket that is 10-15% lighter than you normal racket in oder to train your muscle fibers to swing faster. Follow this phase with a lot of shadow swingning and actuall hitting with your normal racket in oder to "find" your timing again.
 

Fedace

Banned
Not a good idea. Possible injury to the arm and it may train your muscle fibers to swing slower rather than faster. I've posted a Sports Science video on this subject in quite a few previous threads.

You might Overload-Underload Training, but this may be difficult to implement. Try shadow swinging a racket that is no more than 10-15% heavier (or 10-15% greater swingweight) than you normal playing racket. (This may tend to throw off your timing a bit). Follow this up with the Underload phase -- shadow swing with a racket that is 10-15% lighter than you normal racket in oder to train your muscle fibers to swing faster. Follow this phase with a lot of shadow swingning and actuall hitting with your normal racket in oder to "find" your timing again.
Then what is the best way to shadow train ??? Many USTA instructors recommend shadow training while you are at the Office or at work and Can't play. They say it definitely helps to maintain your mechanics. Do you shadow train with Nothing in the hand ??? that would feel strange too. Maybe with light weight in your hand ??:confused:
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Some coaches don't advocate shadow training, but just use your normal racket with enough clearance around you so you don't hit anything like furniture or lamps.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
^ Hope you don't do that right before match time. It will throw off your timing for a while. As I mentioned previously, it also trains your muscle fibers to swing a bit slower rather than faster. Altho' your normal racket will feel lighter after swinging the heavier one, It will not result in you swinging your normal racket faster -- this is a myth and an illusion.

Take a look at the Sports Science video that I've provided previously.


.
 
Last edited:

Bungalo Bill

G.O.A.T.
Hi guys, I have thought of this for awhile. Its possible to wear some wrist weights and do some swinging. So what I was thinking was if I do this quite often, will it increase my swing speed? Or will I be risking injury?
There are studies that show by increasing weight and swining with it that it actually slows down your swing. So you need to do your own research and decide. However, the article cpied and pasted below has some good information regarding finding the right weight for what you are trying to do. I am of the camp that it does not increase swing speed even though this article indicates it does.

Should you use weighted implements?

Posted on Jul 10, 2008 under Clubhead speed, Swing speed, Weighted implements |
The use of heavier golf clubs, baseball bats, weighted donuts or rings, weighted balls and other implements is increasing in popularity. These heavier than normal implements can be of benefit in improving your swing or throw but they can also have the opposite effect, they can worsen your swing or throw. The results that you achieve depend upon your level of fitness, skill mastery, when you use the heavier implements, and how much weight is used.

It is important to understand that when you use a heavier implement, it can change your built-in neuromuscular pathway, i.e., the technique that you have developed over the years. When this happens, you will find that you are more erratic in your swing and your accuracy may decrease, especially accuracy of contact.

In order to get positive benefits from using heavier implements, the weight must be such that it will not change your technique of execution. Thus, the key factor is to figure out how much weight is too much and how much is ideal. Understand that when you use the ideal over-weight you will enhance the force developed by the muscles and retain the same technique. This is due mainly to nervous system learning.

When you use the heavier weight with the same technique, the muscles remember the feel of contracting more strongly to overcome the heavier weight. When you then remove the weight and swing (or throw) in the same manner, you will automatically be swinging (or throwing) faster than you were before. This greater speed develops greater force and thus, your power is enhanced without disturbing your technique and accuracy.

However, if you use too much weight, your technique pattern will be disturbed. There will be different nervous system learning or feedback and possibly development of greater strength in the muscles at particular points in the range of motion that interfere with the neuromuscular pattern that you have already developed. Sadly, there have been few studies to determine exactly how much weight is ideal and how much is too much.

It should also be mentioned that the use of lighter than normal weight implements is also beneficial. The alternation of lighter than normal, normal and heavier than normal can be of great benefit, but the key factor to successful use is knowing how much weight should be used.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Excellent feedback, BB (especially cuz it pretty much backs up what I've been saying for a while). It sounds like Dr. Yessis would be an advocate of OU Training. This has been used, with reported success, in baseball training camps as well as for training for some track & field events (javelin, shot put, etc.). For both baseball training and track & field training, I've seen 10-15% overload & underload recommended (never >20%).

Check out my earlier post in another thread. It provides that Sport Science link I mentioned above: tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?p=3510505
.
 

Bungalo Bill

G.O.A.T.
Excellent feedback, BB (especially cuz it pretty much backs up what I've been saying for a while). It sounds like Dr. Yessis would be an advocate of OU Training. This has been used, with reported success, in baseball training camps as well as for training for some track & field events (javelin, shot put, etc.). For both baseball training and track & field training, I've seen 10-15% overload & underload recommended (never >20%).

Check out my earlier post in another thread. It provides that Sport Science link I mentioned above: tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?p=3510505
.
Yes, fo rme it is a bit of common sense. Most people dont realize how involved the stablizing muscles are as compared to the large muscles in their efforts to hit a ball. More weight to many means better. However, when the stablizing muscles disengage because the weight is too heavy and the large muscles need to take over, perhaps at this time, the stroke or swing has a higher chance in changing which could hurt one's game.

I am not a physicist or a sports medicine person, but it just seems like common sense that if you are going to weight up, we need to do it with small weight in order to maintain our form and not alter our technique.

Whether it improves swing speed is another matter all together.
 

user92626

G.O.A.T.
I am not a physicist or a sports medicine person, but it just seems like common sense that if you are going to weight up, we need to do it with small weight in order to maintain our form and not alter our technique.
Isn't it also common sense that no one's gonna put on more weight and start training, say, swinging like squatting flies? Well, hopefully, the OP is smarter than that.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
^ No, it's not really common sense for everyone at all. The OP is talking about using wrist weights -- that would be several pounds (or kilograms). If we limit the added weight (or swingweight) to 15% then we are talking about 1-2 oz, not pounds.

Then what is the best way to shadow train ??? Many USTA instructors recommend shadow training while you are at the Office or at work and Can't play. They say it definitely helps to maintain your mechanics. Do you shadow train with Nothing in the hand ??? that would feel strange too. Maybe with light weight in your hand ??:confused:
I do perform some shadow swings with an empty hand. However, I perform much more shadow swinging with my regular playing racket. Part of what I'm practicing with my shadow swings is keeping my head still with my eyes focused on an imaginary contact point.

As far as light weights go, remember that rackets weigh less than 1 pound (however, the swingweight of a racket could very well be greater than that of a 1 pound weight).
 
Top