Shared holes or one-piece only rackets, why?

bruno hau

Semi-Pro
Why do some rackets require one-piece stringing or use shared holes? Any advantages to them? What were they thinking when they made such racket requirements?

I just strung an old Wilson Ultra 2 Largehead (18x19 pattern) which pretty much required me to do a one-piece stringing. Last main finishes at bottom and last 3 bottom mains (9th, 8th, 7th) are shared holes with 6th a non-tying hole. 5th is a tying hole but would leave too long a tail (4” inches) and would no longer be flushed against the frame.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
You either have shared holes or you don’t. When you string your racket 1 or 2 piece you still have shared holes.
 

bruno hau

Semi-Pro
What I am trying to say is because of the shared holes, I can’t use them as tie holes and have to look for the next available tie hole which is too far away.
 
Which ultra racket do you have do you have a picture?
I also have a Yonex vcore with shared holes and it's grommets got teared due to extra stress they face....... Shared holes are worst idea I don't know why companies design them. Is there any particular reason?? And are those grommets really prone to break.

Sad part is that Yonex never produced grommets for those racquets. Now always get them strung like that so far no damage have happened.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Why not? Back in the days of wood, every frame had shared holes. If you think of a better "mousetrap", patent the idea and tnen point them towards it. There have been attempts, but most stringers do not care so long as the racquet can be strung with a minimum of "fuss and bother." Ideas like locking single pieces of string, mounting adapters, etc. were introduced and just as quickly discarded. Shared holes just require some planning. Do that and the job becomes easy. If it bothers you to have deformed grommets, replace them with FITTEX, which is what I do for wrecked tie off grommets. I charge extra for that; use to be $2/hole; now it it up to $5/hole. hehe.
 

struggle

Legend
Wood racquets didn't have grommets. Spacing was a lot closer as well.

Shared holes are generally more "problematic", but not the end of the world.
Seeing as how most popular racquets nowadays don't have such, they do seem unnecessary.
 
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ryushen21

Legend
Why do some rackets require one-piece stringing or use shared holes? Any advantages to them? What were they thinking when they made such racket requirements?

I just strung an old Wilson Ultra 2 Largehead (18x19 pattern) which pretty much required me to do a one-piece stringing. Last main finishes at bottom and last 3 bottom mains (9th, 8th, 7th) are shared holes with 6th a non-tying hole. 5th is a tying hole but would leave too long a tail (4” inches) and would no longer be flushed against the frame.
You said the 5th works as a tie-off location, so make it work?
 
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