Shoes are so good now.

Ultra 2

Professional
When I first got the Air Trainer 1 in 88, I thought those were awesome. Course they lasted a couple of weeks on the court.. durable rubber outsoles came a few years later though.
 

Tar Heel Tennis

Professional
I wear Stan Smiths all the time as a casual shoe. I can’t imagine playing in them.
You don't know what you're missing. I have a pair that I occasionally wear on a Har-Tru court. I love the light weight and comfort. Though I wouldn't recommend wearing them on a hard court. I wore a pair of Nike Fingertrap Max shoes this morning - I was delighted when my opponent declared how demoralizing it was to see that I was beating him wearing untied shoes!
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
In the 70s I bought a pair of Patricks - at one point I started feeling pain in my heels, checked them and there were nails/brads sticking up through the insole. They looked nice though.
 

bertrevert

Hall of Fame
So today's kicks give you better, er, kicks?

Yeah nah we like to complain, just let us (internet forum who could we possibly offend), in that long-running
thread about the decline of proper cushioning but I guess you reckon there's an... incline?
 

JW10S

Hall of Fame
When I first started playing tennis everyone, even the pros, wore canvas tennis shoes. Converse Skid-Grip and Dunlop Volleys were the most common. They had little support, little cushioning, wore out quickly, got soaking wet with sweat so you'd have to bring a few pairs when playing tournament matches. I don't know how I avoided major injury wearing those shoes. When Adidas came out with the Robert Haillets (which later became the Stan Smiths) I remember people were amazed, 'leather tennis shoes?!' But leather shoes, while better, needed to be broken in before match play and were sometimes a little heavy. I remember reading how Bjorn Borg would have his coach wear his Diadoras to break them in for Borg. Now you can get shoes that are light, supportive, comfortable, durable and you can wear many of them right out of the box. But I wouldn't mind getting a pair of Skid-Grips or Volleys just for old times sake...
 
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tennis4me

Hall of Fame
Shoes are getting better, but they're also getting considerably more expensive, plus some brands like Adidas no longer offers the 6mo warranty. Prices should be lower with warranty removed
 
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tennis4me

Hall of Fame
No big apparel brand offers 6 months warranty on all their models, and I agree that the tennis shoes have become overly expensive for what they are.

:cool:
Asics still does on some of their high end models. Adidas, I believe, completely removed their 6mo warranty on all models.

Luckily, I don't have the urge to buy the latest models.
 

Winners or Errors

Hall of Fame
I had a pair of Asahi (I think) with gum rubber soles - those didn't last long on court. I remember getting the first Reebok court shoes as well. What I really remember about those days is how, as a teenager, I was begging for shoes because I'd literally rip through the toes in a month at the most. I'm sure it drove my parents nuts.
 
I’ve been playing tennis in $60 Adidas Rockadia Trailrunners for a decade. My knees thanked me for it, and I haven’t looked back.
 

robbo1970

Hall of Fame
I think the overall pricing on a lot of sports equipment these days has got way out of control. If the general opinion is to try and encourage kids from all backgrounds to take up sport and to remove any elitism, the top sports brands are not doing a very good job to help that cause.

The prices of racquets has got ridiculous. Most regular players generally like to have two of the same racquet (sometimes more), but with current prices, that's not a lot of change from $450. Generally, most of us like to have a spare pair of shoes too.

Now if we consider the finances that a promising youngster will have, how are they supposed to afford to just participate.

With regards to shoes though, I think there are some really good options in the 'club player' ranges these days, that are closer to being more sensibly priced. I've tried the Adidas Game Court and they were good. Currently I'm using a pair of Asics Game Point. They are about the cheapest club player model Asics made and I cannot fault the durability or comfort. I use mine on hard courts and the tread is showing little signs of wear.

I have tried some of the higher end models and to be honest, I wasn't that impressed. If I could offer any advice, I would always suggest trying some of the club/recreational models. I have tried Adidas, Asics and Lotto and all versions felt better than more expensive models.
 

bertrevert

Hall of Fame
Whaaaaaaaaaaaaat the..........??? These work? What surfaces?

Price - if you buy the latest you aren't paying for materials, you are paying for R&D (and marketing and so on). Nothing wrong with that. Pay for progress. However the point of the other thread I mentioned (decline of proper cushioning) was that we aren't even making much progress, indeed may be going backwards. Yes tennis shoes are better than the 90's but are they any better in the last 10 years? No they're not I think is the takeaway from that thread...

Ps. what the point of comparison to the 90s? Pretty sure I wouldn't want drive one of my 90s cars anymore either...
 
Whaaaaaaaaaaaaat the..........??? These work? What surfaces?

Price - if you buy the latest you aren't paying for materials, you are paying for R&D (and marketing and so on). Nothing wrong with that. Pay for progress. However the point of the other thread I mentioned (decline of proper cushioning) was that we aren't even making much progress, indeed may be going backwards. Yes tennis shoes are better than the 90's but are they any better in the last 10 years? No they're not I think is the takeaway from that thread...

Ps. what the point of comparison to the 90s? Pretty sure I wouldn't want drive one of my 90s cars anymore either...
I use them on both hard court and clay.

I discovered long ago that running shoes in general have much better cushioning than tennis shoes. I started wearing the Rockadias to recover from knee tendinitis.

I also discovered that, parodoxically, I am less likely to suffer ankle roll injury when I regularly wear running shoes instead of tennis shoes. Running shoes have a soft edge, while tennis shoes have a hard edge for ‘better stability.’ But that doesn’t take into account that playing tennis in running shoes strengthens the stabilizer muscles on the sides of my ankles and keeps the stabilizer nerves sensing and firing properly.

When I wear tennis shoes, those ankle muscles atrophy and put me at risk. Once you start to go over that hard edge, your ankle is toast. But the soft edge of running shoes gives you a chance to sense and recover.

The Rockadias come in a few colors with no marking soles. I like the neon yellow.
 

tennis4me

Hall of Fame
I use them on both hard court and clay.

I discovered long ago that running shoes in general have much better cushioning than tennis shoes. I started wearing the Rockadias to recover from knee tendinitis.

I also discovered that, parodoxically, I am less likely to suffer ankle roll injury when I regularly wear running shoes instead of tennis shoes. Running shoes have a soft edge, while tennis shoes have a hard edge for ‘better stability.’ But that doesn’t take into account that playing tennis in running shoes strengthens the stabilizer muscles on the sides of my ankles and keeps the stabilizer nerves sensing and firing properly.

When I wear tennis shoes, those ankle muscles atrophy and put me at risk. Once you start to go over that hard edge, your ankle is toast. But the soft edge of running shoes gives you a chance to sense and recover.

The Rockadias come in a few colors with no marking soles. I like the neon yellow.
The deep ridges on the rubber sole doesn't give you problem? The sole is usually not as flat on the ground because they have gaps between the rubber that touches the court.

Hmm. Interesting use of running shoes. I know they have better cushion - a lot better usually. I'm assuming your shoes is non-marking?
 
The deep ridges on the rubber sole doesn't give you problem? The sole is usually not as flat on the ground because they have gaps between the rubber that touches the court.

Hmm. Interesting use of running shoes. I know they have better cushion - a lot better usually. I'm assuming your shoes is non-marking?
They come in nonmarking sole colors like yellow or red.
 

CiscoPC600

Professional
Is there a consensus top 3 or 5 shoes? I haven't ventured away from Asics after getting back into the sports and having a few friends recommend Gel Resolution and Solution Speed FF. They're comfy with no break in period. The Speed FFs aren't as comfy but they are lighter. I'm open to trying other shoes though.
 

Jouke

Semi-Pro
Is there a consensus top 3 or 5 shoes? I haven't ventured away from Asics after getting back into the sports and having a few friends recommend Gel Resolution and Solution Speed FF. They're comfy with no break in period. The Speed FFs aren't as comfy but they are lighter. I'm open to trying other shoes though.
I disagree on the no break in period. I love my asics but they need about 5-10 hours to break in.
 

r2473

G.O.A.T.
I just wait until the price drops. No way I'm spending over 100 on shoes I'll wear out in 3 months.
$50 always been my limit.

For 5+ years, I was able to get a new pair every 3 months from TW with the warranty. I seriously spent $50 total on shoes for 5+ years.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
I use them on both hard court and clay.

I discovered long ago that running shoes in general have much better cushioning than tennis shoes. I started wearing the Rockadias to recover from knee tendinitis.

I also discovered that, parodoxically, I am less likely to suffer ankle roll injury when I regularly wear running shoes instead of tennis shoes. Running shoes have a soft edge, while tennis shoes have a hard edge for ‘better stability.’ But that doesn’t take into account that playing tennis in running shoes strengthens the stabilizer muscles on the sides of my ankles and keeps the stabilizer nerves sensing and firing properly.

When I wear tennis shoes, those ankle muscles atrophy and put me at risk. Once you start to go over that hard edge, your ankle is toast. But the soft edge of running shoes gives you a chance to sense and recover.

The Rockadias come in a few colors with no marking soles. I like the neon yellow.
No club with clay courts I play at would let you step on the court in those. You would rip them up with that tread.
 

galain

Hall of Fame
When I first started playing tennis everyone, even the pros, wore canvas tennis shoes. Converse Skid-Grip and Dunlop Volleys were the most common. They had little support, little cushioning, wore out quickly, got soaking wet with sweat so you'd have to bring a few pairs when playing tournament matches. I don't know how I avoided major injury wearing those shoes. When Adidas came out with the Robert Haillets (which later became the Stan Smiths) I remember people were amazed, 'leather tennis shoes?!' But leather shoes, while better, needed to be broken in before match play and were sometimes a little heavy. I remember reading how Bjorn Borg would have his coach wear his Diadoras to break them in for Borg. Now you can get shoes that are light, supportive, comfortable, durable and you can wear many of them right out of the box. But I wouldn't mind getting a pair of Skid-Grips or Volleys just for old times sake...
Sadly, Dunlop no longer makes the Volley. The company were bought out a few years back and produced what they called the "Volley International". It was terrible in comparison to the original Volley - very narrow, an insole that would fly up and bite your achilles tendon and a sole that wore out in about a week. Now they have the Volley Heritage - which some customer service rep told me was THE original Volley, back from the dead. But it was wasn't. Couldn't get my foot into it.

I know the Volley was an old style canvas shoe, but it had a place in my heart and I still think it was a very good clay court shoe. Even members of the Aussie Davis Cup team wore them for a clay court tie not all the long ago when they were still available.
 

mctennis

Hall of Fame
I remember those Chang pump shoes. My son wanted a pair of those so much. They were more than I made in a weeks pay. No way was I going to buy them for my son to wear. He never did get a pair of them, even after he had a job.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
Shoes are ridiculously overpriced now. Who the hell is paying these prices? Is everyone crazy?
agreed
and now they including the 6month warranty on most shoes to try to justify the $150+ price tags
the companies are banking on the fact that most people do not turn them in before the 6month time frame,,
its pricing game BS!!
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
agreed
and now they including the 6month warranty on most shoes to try to justify the $150+ price tags
the companies are banking on the fact that most people do not turn them in before the 6month time frame,,
its pricing game BS!!
Seriously, Ubersonic 3 is available under $55. Just keep searching
 

armandogomes

New User
and now they including the 6month warranty on most shoes to try to justify the $150+ price tags
the companies are banking on the fact that most people do not turn them in before the 6month time frame,,
I like the 6-month warranty, given that after 4 to 5 weeks, they are ready to be replaced. Getting "pricier" 100$/€ models with warranty is the same as getting two pairs at 50$/€ but with better quality (allegedly).
 
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