Shot of the year?

#8
AT 13:37, Querrey is serving in the third set 4-5 0-15. Then Simon hits a crazy shot.
This how it's done (strip off the http:// and tack on &t=13m37s or &t=817)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=IowDZRTVZiY&t=13m37s
www.youtube.com/watch?v=IowDZRTVZiY&t=817


or add :817 using the Media command


Not too shabby, but Gilles has nothing on this classic from his countrywoman, Mary Pierce:



Nothing to do with this thread... but it came up right after I found the Mary Pierce clip:

 
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#12
For me, Nadal's drop shot against Djoker on MP at Wimbledon. Sure, there were flashier, far more difficult shots in 2018, but none at such an important moment and none as surprising or as perfectly executed. At 6:50:

Probably, given the stakes, the shot of 2018, and didn't it come right after Novak's passing shot at 7-7 in the breaker. Amazing match and sequence!
 
#15
“What is Holland ?”

“What do you mean what is it. It’s a country right next to Belgium.”

“No that’s The Netherlands.”

“Holland is The Netherlands.”

“Then who are the Dutch ?”

:laughing:
Gotta laugh at myself as well. Even tho' I know a fair amount about Western (& Northern) Euro geography/history, I have always found all this to be rather perplexing. Well, at least I know that Danes are from Denmark -- and their language & pastries are Danish. Quite a bit of outstanding badminton (& some tennis) there. And a lot of them hang out and have shops in Solvang, Calif.
 
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#16
The whole interaction though. The whole scene.

George puts down the newspaper and prompted I guess by something he read he pops Jerry with the “what is Holland?” And Jerry does those two long blinks staring at him with a WTF expression and with that ridiculous mustache. And when later George says “then what are the Dutch ?” Jerry just ignores him and moves on to the next absurdity where we learn what the deal with the mustaches is, “to take a vacation from ourselves.” :-D
 
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#17
The whole interaction though. The whole scene.

George puts down the newspaper and prompted I guess by something he read he pops Jerry with the “what is Holland?” And Jerry does those two long blinks staring at him with a WTF expression and with that ridiculous mustache. And when later George says “then what are the Dutch ?” Jerry just ignores him and moves on to the next absurdity where we learn what the deal with the mustaches is, “to take a vacation from ourselves.” :-D
Blooper/outtake version of the scene (w/o the porn star comment)



Ok, one last irrelevant video I came across during my search for the Mary Pierce vid. Sorry, OP. Who is this player/actress with Rog?

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#18
@plays tennis

And now we return you to our regularly scheduled thread topic: creative shot-making. French tennis has quite a history of flair & creative shot-making. This is reflected with players such as: Suzanne Lenglen, René Lacoste (& the other Four Musketeers), Yannick Noah, Henri Leconte, Mary Pierce, Jo-Willie Tsonga, Fabrice Santoro, Richard Gasquet, Gael Monfils, Gilles Simon & others.

THE ART OF FRENCH TENNIS

Submitted for your entertainment: Jo-W Tsonga & more Gilles Simon



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#19
Gotta laugh at myself as well. Even tho' I know a fair amount about Western (& Northern) geography/history, I have always found all this to be rather perplexing. Well, at least I know that Danes are from Denmark -- and their language & pastries are Danish. Quite a bit of outstanding badminton (& some tennis) there. And a lot of them hang out and have shops in Solvang, Calif.
Danish pastries are actually Austrian in origin due to the delicacy being introduced to Danish shoppers by immigrant Austrian bakers during the mid-19th century.
 
#20
Danish pastries are actually Austrian in origin due to the delicacy being introduced to Danish shoppers by immigrant Austrian bakers during the mid-19th century.
This I did not know. It seems that Danishes have been Danish for less than 2 centuries. Introduced to Denmark in the 1840-50s by Austrian bakers (from Vienna) during an extended period of time when Danish bakery workers had gone on strike. In Denmark, Danish pastries are often known as Viennese treats or Vienna Bread. But never heard this reference in Solvang bakeries. This brings to mind the stuff sold/known as Hawaiian Sweet Bread. It's really Portuguese sweet bread that's been sold as "Hawaiian" by King's Bakery since the mid 20th century. After WWII, Hawaii become very popular as a vacation spot and the "go to" place. It became highly marketable. Even the Hawaiian ukulele is really Portuguese.
 
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#21
This I did not know. It seems that Danishes have been Danish for less than 2 centuries. Introduced to Denmark in the 1840-50s by Austrian bakers (from Vienna) during an extended period of time when Danish bakery workers had gone on strike. In Denmark, Danish pastries are often known as Viennese treats or Vienna Bread. This brings to mind the stuff sold/known as Hawaiian Sweet Bread. It's really Portuguese sweet bread that's been sold as "Hawaiian" by King's Bakery since the mid 20th century. After WWII, Hawaii become very popular as a vacation spot and the "go to" place. It became highly marketable. Even then Hawaiian ukulele is really Portuguese.
And SPAM became a Hawaiian favorite due to the US Army/Marines reliance on the canned meat (SPiced hAM) to feed the troops stationed there during WW2 before shipped to Pacific Theater battle zones. Average per capita consumption in The Aloha State is five cans per year!
 
#22
This I did not know. It seems that Danishes have been Danish for less than 2 centuries. Introduced to Denmark in the 1840-50s by Austrian bakers (from Vienna) during an extended period of time when Danish bakery workers had gone on strike. In Denmark, Danish pastries are often known as Viennese treats or Vienna Bread. But never heard this reference in Solvang bakeries. This brings to mind the stuff sold/known as Hawaiian Sweet Bread. It's really Portuguese sweet bread that's been sold as "Hawaiian" by King's Bakery since the mid 20th century. After WWII, Hawaii become very popular as a vacation spot and the "go to" place. It became highly marketable. Even then Hawaiian ukulele is really Portuguese.
Hopefully, the Austrian Danishes are fresh, or there would be something rotten in Denmark.
 
#23
And SPAM became a Hawaiian favorite due to the US Army/Marines reliance on the canned meat (SPiced hAM) to feed the troops stationed there during WW2 before shipped to Pacific Theater battle zones. Average per capita consumption in The Aloha State is five cans per year!
If @r2473 had grown up in "The Islands", he's undoubtedly be a spam junkie rather than being hooked on bacon.
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#25
Danish pastries are actually Austrian in origin due to the delicacy being introduced to Danish shoppers by immigrant Austrian bakers during the mid-19th century.
This I did not know. It seems that Danishes have been Danish for less than 2 centuries. Introduced to Denmark in the 1840-50s by Austrian bakers (from Vienna) during an extended period of time when Danish bakery workers had gone on strike. In Denmark, Danish pastries are often known as Viennese treats or Vienna Bread. But never heard this reference in Solvang bakeries. This brings to mind the stuff sold/known as Hawaiian Sweet Bread. It's really Portuguese sweet bread that's been sold as "Hawaiian" by King's Bakery since the mid 20th century. After WWII, Hawaii become very popular as a vacation spot and the "go to" place. It became highly marketable. Even then Hawaiian ukulele is really Portuguese.




Wait a second . . . I misread the thread title . . . thought it was "Shots of wienerbrød."
 
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