Should I Pay?

Should I pay?


  • Total voters
    24

The Green Mile

Bionic Poster
A scenario played out at my Tennis Club today. I was playing in a Club Day, when my strings broke and I only had the one racquet on me (I have a couple more, but usually leave them at home on Club Days). So, I asked a mate I know at the Club if I could borrow one of his racquets. He said yes. A couple matches into the day, I manage to break this racquets strings. I look at it and it's snapped relatively close to the middle of the head. After the game, I tell him what happened and he says I have to pay for some new strings. I question him, and he tells me that he hasn't restrung for about 6 months. And he plays regularly too. I argue this and he storms off. So what should I do? Pay for them? Or not pay for them?
 

SoBad

G.O.A.T.
Agree with the majority sentiment here -- pay him. Making friends is hard enough, but getting rid of people like this can be even harder. Think of it as paying for a life lesson and garbage collection bundled into a special package.
 

tipsa...don'tlikehim!

Talk Tennis Guru
Because I am usually (too) nice I would suggest 50/50 and if the guy wants me to pay all sorry but he is not what I would call "my mate" (it is not like it is big money anyway)
And yeah I know that none of my mate would ask me to pay anyway...
 
D

Deleted member 733170

Guest
With due respect to you it seems you are angry as you perceive there in an injustice. If he was a reasonable guy he might have said, 'don't worry mate' or 'can you chip in 50%?'

I'm sure you would probably do that!?

But in this case you have to pay for them if he asks. I wouldn't get too het up about this and banish him as friend either. We all have friends who are tight a*es!
 

kingcheetah

Hall of Fame
I say pay for the string. If he hadn't had a racquet in the first place you would've been in a rough spot for the day. It's not that much money (Unless it was gut) and if you all are close at all it's better to just deal with it than start some feud or argument.
 

Zielmann

Semi-Pro
IMO, borrower has the responsibility to make sure it is returned in no worse condition than when it was received. This would include offering to pay for restringing it if you break the strings.

Who knows, perhaps if you had returned the racquet with the money for the string job upfront, this guy might have appreciated the sentiment and not even taken the money.
 

HRB

Hall of Fame
Guys had his strings in there for 6 months, and "plays regularly"...why are you hanging out with a wretched pusher??? Pay this fool and then smoke him off the court whenever you can.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
String breaking is not a deliberate action and he wasn't practicing against a ball machine or returning Karlovic serves, just playing at the Club Day, so why is he responsible?
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
Side-topic, if I brought a racquet with a 6-month old stringjob, wouldn't I be all too happy that someone gave me an excuse to have a new stringjob?
 

Mr.Lob

Legend
Your friend should have asked you to pay half for a new string job. You should have offered to pay for the whole amount.
 

sarmpas

Hall of Fame
The decent thing for you to do it pay for it. On the other hand if I lent a racket to a friend and he broke the strings I wouldn't ask him to pay for a restring but that's just me.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
The fact is that upon borrowing the racquet you accept responsibility for returning it in the condition it was given you, like it or not.

This is obviously not possible, but this does not mean you should pay for a new restring in its entirety.

You are really only responsible for the damage caused to a highly used string, not replacing it with a new one.

You should have offered to pay for the labor involved with the restring, but he supplies the string as the string you played with had next to no value.

Or, more simply, you should have gone halves.
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
You have a few more racquets "but usually leave them at home on Club Days." Ummmm, why? Doesn't seem to make much sense, does it? So look at it this way: whatever you pay to belong to the club, a small part of that would have been essentially lost if you hadn't been able to use the club without a racquet. So your friend loaning you a racquet gave you more value for your membership. Pay for the stringing.
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
You did break the string, so you have to pay. I'm also too nice. I wouldn't have it in me to demand the money if I broke a string that was close to death. You have been set up.
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
One can go a little too far with this "you have to return it in the condition your borrowed it" thing. I borrow a friend's car for the afternoon, drive three miles and the transmission goes. $3000 to replace it. Am I expected to foot the entire bill??
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
One can go a little too far with this "you have to return it in the condition your borrowed it" thing. I borrow a friend's car for the afternoon, drive three miles and the transmission goes. $3000 to replace it. Am I expected to foot the entire bill??
Exactly my point.
 
Offer to get the racket strung. Have it restrung with shoe strings. Upon returning it, hold it high above your head while eyeballing him hard. Then let it drop. When it hits the ground, have the music strike up "Here's a quarter, call someone who cares". Kiss each bicep, point to the sky, and yell "Momma only raised gangsters in this house!" Raise your middle finger, turn, and walk away. Ensure your middle finger stays raised as you walk away so that he can observe said finger.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
If you borrow a racket, and it snaps, and its splinters fly and injure you, whose responsibility is it?
 

The Green Mile

Bionic Poster
Well, the overwhelmingly majority thinks I should pay. So I must have been looking at it wrong. He's also one to hold a grudge for a little while. So I'll guess I'll pay him.
 

The Green Mile

Bionic Poster
You have a few more racquets "but usually leave them at home on Club Days." Ummmm, why? Doesn't seem to make much sense, does it? So look at it this way: whatever you pay to belong to the club, a small part of that would have been essentially lost if you hadn't been able to use the club without a racquet. So your friend loaning you a racquet gave you more value for your membership. Pay for the stringing.
Only bring all my racquets when i'm playing in a tournament. If it's just a Club Day, I only bring the one in a single racquet bag.
 

Sysyphus

Talk Tennis Guru
I'd say pay up, reason being that he did do you a favor in the first place, and it's not that expensive. While it's clearly not very generous of your mate, I don't think you gain anything much by taking a hard principled stance, except for a few bucks, but you might disenchant that guy a fair bit. Given how little is at stake, I'd say it's not quite worth it. Had it been a huge sum in question, and he'd acted similarly, then it would definitely be another matter.

Now, I don't quite agree with those that suggest that you need to shun this dude (unless you think his an arse otherwise too), but I wouldn't take any more favors from him, and not get out of my way to give him any either.
 
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The Green Mile

Bionic Poster
I'd say pay up for the reasons that he did do you a favor in the first place, and it's not that expensive. While it's clearly not very generous of your mate, I don't think you gain anything much by taking a hard principled stance, except for a few bucks, but you might disenchant that guy a fair bit. Given how little is at stake, I'd say it's not quite worth it. Had it been a huge sum in question, and he'd acted similarly, then it would definitely be another matter.

Now, I don't quite agree with those that suggest that you need to shun this dude (unless you think his an arse otherwise too), but I wouldn't take any more favors from him, and not get out of my way to give him any either.
Nah, he's all good, I just wasn't expecting it tbh.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
The condition you borrowed it in is a tricky point as you were given something that worked and returned something that didn't, so it makes you liable at some level.

Here you borrowed a car with a transmission that had only three miles left on it, so you are liable for probably about less than 1% of that $3000 bill.

In real life the car's owner would probably be vexatious enough to assert that your driving caused significantly premature breakage.

With regard to the racquet, you could probably get away with paying:

- nothing for the string as it was way beyond its useful life
- very little for the labour of the restring given that it was a cost that would soon arise

With a racquet again you've got the problem that it can be perhaps more convincingly asserted that your playing caused the string to break.

The sums are trivial so paying for the labour is not too big a stretch and it gives him a racquet that functions.

With expensive items, you'd obviously would not want to give in so easily on the point that the cost of repair is mainly their cost to bear.

In short, the person demanding payment for the string is being extremely unreasonable, but presumably in his mind you had a duty to return it in a functioning state.

He should however have made that a condition of the loan.

If I could risk a speculation on psychology: it seems that when something breaks people expect you to chip in because their favour saved you the cost of a rental.

But that misses the point of a favour: it's meant to be a cost-free gift unless you abuse it.

Hence, whatever recompense you make is in the form of a favour.

One can go a little too far with this "you have to return it in the condition your borrowed it" thing. I borrow a friend's car for the afternoon, drive three miles and the transmission goes. $3000 to replace it. Am I expected to foot the entire bill??
 
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SoBad

G.O.A.T.
One can go a little too far with this "you have to return it in the condition your borrowed it" thing. I borrow a friend's car for the afternoon, drive three miles and the transmission goes. $3000 to replace it. Am I expected to foot the entire bill??
I think the lesson here is to be mindful of who you ask for a favor at a time of need.
 

Zielmann

Semi-Pro
One can go a little too far with this "you have to return it in the condition your borrowed it" thing. I borrow a friend's car for the afternoon, drive three miles and the transmission goes. $3000 to replace it. Am I expected to foot the entire bill??
With something like this, it depends on the cause. If you were at fault for the busted transmission (throw it into reverse on the highway, or shift gears without using the clutch in a manual or something of that nature), then yeah, you abused the car and you pay for it. Outside of that, that signifies a problem with the vehicle long before you used it and it would have busted just as quickly had the owner been driving it that day.

That last bit is important. Yes, the strings were 6 months old and most people will consider that the end of the useful life of strings even if you barely play them. But we don't know if the owner of the racquet would have considered it the end of their useful life at that point or not (presumably not, or he'd have restrung it). Maybe he's not a big string breaker and those would have lasted him another few months before breaking or when he deemed it time to replace them.

Were I on the borrower's side here, I'd have offered the money up-front (either handed the cash with the frame, or brought it up and offered to pay for it right away). At the same time, had I lent out the racquet in this situation, I'd have not requested or accepted the money for the restringing.
 

Jay_The_Nomad

Professional
If he was a nice guy, he would say forget about it.

But you should pay up regardless. You borrowed it after all.

And he sure as hell ain't no friend.
 
C

Cenarius

Guest
Don't pay him.You didn't abuse the frame in anyway ,it wasn't even an off center snap and the strings were soo old.It is supose to be a free favor and the guy want to scam you.If you were injured by his stick he wouldn't had payed the money of your recovery.Don't forget your backup again.
 

The Green Mile

Bionic Poster
Don't pay him.You didn't abuse the frame in anyway ,it wasn't even an off center snap and the strings were soo old.It is supose to be a free favor and the guy want to scam you.If you were injured by his stick he wouldn't had payed the money of your recovery.Don't forget your backup again.
It's all sorted now. He was happy with me paying for half.
 

Jay_The_Nomad

Professional
Not sure why people are saying this? Judging him over this one thing is pretty ridiculous imo...
I'm not suggesting to get petty or picky over this.

Just pointing out that such exchanges often speaks of a person's character and I've met such people in my own network. I usually don't bother going out of my way to invest in a relationship with them because I know that if I'm in a pickle they can't be counted on.

Doesn't mean I won't play tennis with them or be cordial. But I won't be inviting them over for dinner lol.

We need to know who we can and cannot count on and invest our time accordingly.
 

millicurie999

Semi-Pro
I'm not suggesting to get petty or picky over this.

Just pointing out that such exchanges often speaks of a person's character and I've met such people in my own network. I usually don't bother going out of my way to invest in a relationship with them because I know that if I'm in a pickle they can't be counted on.

Doesn't mean I won't play tennis with them or be cordial. But I won't be inviting them over for dinner lol.

We need to know who we can and cannot count on and invest our time accordingly.
As someone else said, the civilized thing to do is for the OP to offer to pay, and for his friend to refuse. In that sense, your statement would apply to both parties in question, regarding characters revealed by this incident.
 

CurrenFan

Rookie
A scenario played out at my Tennis Club today. I was playing in a Club Day, when my strings broke and I only had the one racquet on me (I have a couple more, but usually leave them at home on Club Days). So, I asked a mate I know at the Club if I could borrow one of his racquets. He said yes. A couple matches into the day, I manage to break this racquets strings. I look at it and it's snapped relatively close to the middle of the head. After the game, I tell him what happened and he says I have to pay for some new strings. I question him, and he tells me that he hasn't restrung for about 6 months. And he plays regularly too. I argue this and he storms off. So what should I do? Pay for them? Or not pay for them?
What a complete, bloody b*st*rd, loaning you inferior equipment and then thinking you should be responsible for upgrading his sorry junk that couldn't withstand the force of your awesomeness. The nerve of some people! I wouldn't bother trying to talk to the guy ever again.

In fact, you really ought to think about joining a new club...

.....

.... because your former friend has told everyone else at the club what a stingy, ungrateful, lacking-in-class SOB you are...

... And he's 100% correct.

... and you're probably going to have a hard time finding anyone at the club who will even look your way.

Good move - friends and the opinions of others are hardly worth anything these days. Certainly not the cost of a stringjob - heck, that would pay for a half week's worth of beers at the pub, wouldn't it?
 
C

Cenarius

Guest
It's all sorted now. He was happy with me paying for half.
Ok, something in the middle.But if I were you I would never ask for or loan any equipment again.So you have no more this kind of issues.Rember bring to the courts all that you could possibly need.
 
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