Simona Halep admitted to hospital with dehydration after the Australian Open final

Aussie Darcy

Bionic Poster
Well this is a really bad look for the Australian Open. Simona Halep suffered extreme dehydration following her 2.5 hour final loss on Saturday night and was admitted to hospital for 4+ hours. She was released Sunday morning.

The heat policy was initiated by Australian Open organisers for the women’s final, with both Halep and Wozniacki enjoying a 10-minute break between the second and third sets.

“I needed it for the breathing, for the head because I had headache during the match,” Halep revealed post-match.

“Is a good rule when you feel that you need it.”

The mercury reached more than 30 degrees in Melbourne on Saturday.

The heat policy has also been initiated for the men’s final between Roger Federer and Marin Cilic after temperatures soared at Melbourne Park on Sunday.


I think it's interesting that the women had to play with the roof open in the same heat as what the men are playing in right now and yet they get a closed roof. Something to ponder.


http://www.news.com.au/sport/tennis...i/news-story/6396a58ba3cc6223deda2b682c096212
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
Their heat rule is rather black and white, and the wet bulb reading was above the limit an hour before the final, so they followed policy.

Well this is a really bad look for the Australian Open. Simona Halep suffered extreme dehydration following her 2.5 hour final loss on Saturday night and was admitted to hospital for 4+ hours. She was released Sunday morning.




I think it's interesting that the women had to play with the roof open in the same heat as what the men are playing in right now and yet they get a closed roof. Something to ponder.


http://www.news.com.au/sport/tennis...i/news-story/6396a58ba3cc6223deda2b682c096212
 

Aussie Darcy

Bionic Poster
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Awful.
 

reaper

Legend
I don't really think it's foreseeable that someone would have the issues Halep apparently had from a night match. Very high temperatures are usually caused by reflected heat from the sun which isn't a factor at night. If it's 35 degrees at night, presumably that's the temperature the match is played in, if it's 35 degrees during the day the on court temperature might be 50 degrees.
 
D

Deleted member 756486

Guest
Aaaaand, inevitably, after Aussie Darcy makes a post about the WTA, it HAD to involve comparisons (actually s*****g on) with the ATP or the general disadvantages of women compared to men in today's society.

We get it, you are a feminist to the bones, but can you not turn every thread in a hating competition?

You are giving a bad name to the cause of equality.

:cool:
Feminism=/=equality
 
Same as Chung's foot pic. Just something to take the sting out, psychologically. There is no way an elite sportsman should allow themselves to reach this level of dehydration. It speaks volumes of the professionalism involved.

Some people dehydrate a lot easier than others-she probably doesn't get any sun in Romania.
 

VaporDude95

Banned
Aaaaand, inevitably, after Aussie Darcy makes a post about the WTA, it HAD to involve comparisons (actually s*****g on) with the ATP or the general disadvantages of women compared to men in today's society.

We get it, you are a feminist to the bones, but can you not turn every thread in a hating competition?

You are giving a bad name to the cause of equality.

:cool:

You’re never gonna get logical thought from a feminist. Don’t bother lol
 

smoledman

G.O.A.T.
Disgraceful conduct by AO officials, not closing the roof for the womens' final. Poor Simona having to endure that + spend 4 hours at the hospital afterwards. Inhuman treatment on par with being in a Gitmo camp.
 

Kalin

Legend
Jokes aside, playing in the heat isn't fun.

But Simona did't help her cause by playing in all those marathon matches before the final. There's a reason Fed is still flying after all those years; he keeps his matches short. Even the final was barely over 3 hours, and this for a tense five-setter.
 

Mr Feeny

Hall of Fame
Well this is a really bad look for the Australian Open. Simona Halep suffered extreme dehydration following her 2.5 hour final loss on Saturday night and was admitted to hospital for 4+ hours. She was released Sunday morning.




I think it's interesting that the women had to play with the roof open in the same heat as what the men are playing in right now and yet they get a closed roof. Something to ponder.


http://www.news.com.au/sport/tennis...i/news-story/6396a58ba3cc6223deda2b682c096212

Didn't pass the wet bulb test. If it's too complicated, let me know and I'll slow down and explain it a little better.
There's nothing insidious in play here. The wet bulb test was passed before the men's final and therefore the roof was closed.

Nobody is out there targeting women. Please stop. And Yes, we know what you'e hinting at.
 
Jokes aside, playing in the heat isn't fun.

But Simona did't help her cause by playing in all those marathon matches before the final. There's a reason Fed is still flying after all those years; he keeps his matches short. Even the final was barely over 3 hours, and this for a tense five-setter.

Always felt this is a big part of why Murray has not won more slams-Fed, Nadal & Novak winning most of their matches in 3 or 4 sets, while Murray kept having to come back from 2 sets down to win in 5 or just going the distance.
 

Mr Feeny

Hall of Fame
Having said that, I'd agree 5hat the ATP and WTP must recalibrate. If a finalist is in that type of condition after a match, then this 'test isn't rigid enough. The standards have to be lowered for closing the roof.

Playing in the heat isn' conducive to a great match anyways. Who wants to watch both participants drained of energy and playing their B games.
 

Aussie Darcy

Bionic Poster
Didn't pass the wet bulb test. If it's too complicated, let me know and I'll slow down and explain it a little better.
There's nothing insidious in play here. The wet bulb test was passed before the men's final and therefore the roof was closed.

Nobody is out there targeting women. Please stop. And Yes, we know what you'e hinting at.
Perhaps having the wet bulb test as the final indicator should be reevaluated considering Novak/Monfils had to play in 40+ heat whilst Cilic/Fed was less than that...
 

reaper

Legend
Having said that, I'd agree 5hat the ATP and WTP must recalibrate. If a finalist is in that type of condition after a match, then this 'test isn't rigid enough. The standards have to be lowered for closing the roof.

Playing in the heat isn' conducive to a great match anyways. Who wants to watch both participants drained of energy and playing their B games.

Were the conditions as oppressive during the women's final as during her earlier match that went to 15-13 in the 3rd? (From memory that day was particularly hot). It's unlikely the conditions the women's final were played under were particularly oppressive so as to cause Halep's condition. More likely to me is the cumulative toll of playing several long matches, and perhaps over training between them...although I don't know what her routine between matches was.
 

Mr Feeny

Hall of Fame
Were the conditions as oppressive during the women's final as during her earlier match that went to 15-13 in the 3rd? (From memory that day was particularly hot). It's unlikely the conditions the women's final were played under were particularly oppressive so as to cause Halep's condition. More likely to me is the cumulative toll of playing several long matches, and perhaps over training between them...although I don't know what her routine between matches was.

Entirely possible. I'd have no way of knowing. You might well be right.
 

smoledman

G.O.A.T.
Having said that, I'd agree 5hat the ATP and WTP must recalibrate. If a finalist is in that type of condition after a match, then this 'test isn't rigid enough. The standards have to be lowered for closing the roof.

Playing in the heat isn' conducive to a great match anyways. Who wants to watch both participants drained of energy and playing their B games.

You bet 2019 AO will have some serious changes on the heat rule after what happened. Also curse the gods who made it 40C!
 

Kalin

Legend
I'm sure Wozniacki could get a few bulbs wet too :oops::oops:

Yeah, I know quite a few people who'd like to meet her under a closed roof :)

But back to tennis, yeah, there comes a time when it's too hot for a quality match and this year the AO seemed to have too many of these days. Tennis isn't football or soccer where playing under the elements is a part of the game; plus, in those sports you can always catch a breather. Seldom so in tennis.

With the weather patterns going crazy worldwide they might have to rethink many policies. After all, why build all those super expensive roofs if you don't use them.
 

reaper

Legend
Entirely possible. I'd have no way of knowing. You might well be right.

The whole wet bulb thing is BS. Would you rather play in blazing sun between 2PM and 5PM on a day when it's 39 degrees and the surface temperature of the court is 60 degrees, or on a warm night of 35 degrees (at the start of the match, but progressively cooling) where there's a bit of humidity in the air that elevates the wet bulb, but where the surface temperature of the court is 35 because there's no sun on it? The only reason they rely on the wet bulb is that it can produce an "objective" reading. Unfortunately the objective reading doesn't correspond to the oppressiveness of the conditions, so serves no purpose.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
I think their concern is the fact that taking everybody off the outside courts in the first week for the duration of a heat wave would set the tournament back a lot.

Yeah, I know quite a few people who'd like to meet her under a closed roof :)

But back to tennis, yeah, there comes a time when it's too hot for a quality match and this year the AO seemed to have too many of these days. Tennis isn't football or soccer where playing under the elements is a part of the game; plus, in those sports you can always catch a breather. Seldom so in tennis.

With the weather patterns going crazy worldwide they might have to rethink many policies. After all, why build all those super expensive roofs if you don't use them.
 

Aussie Darcy

Bionic Poster
Yeah, I know quite a few people who'd like to meet her under a closed roof :)

But back to tennis, yeah, there comes a time when it's too hot for a quality match and this year the AO seemed to have too many of these days. Tennis isn't football or soccer where playing under the elements is a part of the game; plus, in those sports you can always catch a breather. Seldom so in tennis.

With the weather patterns going crazy worldwide they might have to rethink many policies. After all, why build all those super expensive roofs if you don't use them.
I'm sure the policy will be definitely looked at.

What perplexed me is when did the wet bulb temperature become a thing? Schools across Australia use normal temperature as a guideline for closing schools (usually 40 degrees). I believe the Gabba here in Brisbane have a rule about events at a certain temperature and the Brisbane International tennis I thought used normal temperature as well. Had never heard wet bulb temperature be used much before this.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
I think they can take the players off the court if it hits 40, but yes the wet bulb thing weights humidity quite a lot, whereas Melbourne heat waves are a dry heat.

Their extreme heat policy is designed so that play is stopped as least as possible given that not everyone can play under the roof for most of the tournament.

The whole wet bulb thing is BS. Would you rather play in blazing sun between 2PM and 5PM on a day when it's 39 degrees and the surface temperature of the court is 60 degrees, or on a warm night of 35 degrees (at the start of the match, but progressively cooling) where there's a bit of humidity in the air that elevates the wet bulb, but where the surface temperature of the court is 35 because there's no sun on it? The only reason they rely on the wet bulb is that it can produce an "objective" reading. Unfortunately the objective reading doesn't correspond to the oppressiveness of the conditions, so serves no purpose.
 

Mr Feeny

Hall of Fame
The whole wet bulb thing is BS. Would you rather play in blazing sun between 2PM and 5PM on a day when it's 39 degrees and the surface temperature of the court is 60 degrees, or on a warm night of 35 degrees (at the start of the match, but progressively cooling) where there's a bit of humidity in the air that elevates the wet bulb, but where the surface temperature of the court is 35 because there's no sun on it? The only reason they rely on the wet bulb is that it can produce an "objective" reading. Unfortunately the objective reading doesn't correspond to the oppressiveness of the conditions, so serves no purpose.

It' always worse in the daytime because of the sun, but if we were to compare conditions during consecutive nights, during which it's 39 degrees and dry on the first night, and 37 and extremely humid on the second, you'd prefer conditions on the first night.

I'm not sure it's as easy as that. As you say, the whole bulb test might be BS. How do we know that conditions that pass the test are worse than certain others which don't (playing under intense sunlight as you gave as an example.)

I don' know. You might be right.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
The wet bulb is quite a good measure, even if it has difficulties, because it weighs various factors.

The interesting thing is that the wet bulb measurement they use is a daytime measure so thermal comfort does change with nightfall.

So they bascially took the last daytime measurement of 32.7 and kept the roof shut on the basis of this value at that point in time.

Sports Medicine Australia categorises 35 degrees and 30.0 wet bulb measurement as extreme.

For TA it is 40 and 32.5. That's arguable too high, but SMA standards would seriously impact the tournament.

I'm sure the policy will be definitely looked at.

What perplexed me is when did the wet bulb temperature become a thing? Schools across Australia use normal temperature as a guideline for closing schools (usually 40 degrees). I believe the Gabba here in Brisbane have a rule about events at a certain temperature and the Brisbane International tennis I thought used normal temperature as well. Had never heard wet bulb temperature be used much before this.
 

reaper

Legend
It' always worse in the daytime because of the sun, but if we were to compare conditions during consecutive nights, during which it's 39 degrees and dry on the first night, and 37 and extremely humid on the second, you'd prefer conditions on the first night.

I'm not sure it's as easy as that. As you say, the whole bulb test might be BS. How do we know that conditions that pass the test are worse than certain others which don't (playing under intense sunlight as you gave as an example.)

I don' know. You might be right.

The problem with what they're doing is that they're measuring air temperature...possibly in a different part of Melbourne. What they probably should be doing is measuring the temperature of the concrete they're playing on...which reflects heat and massively alters the playing conditions. If the surface temperature of the ground gets above (say) 60 degrees (from memory the ground was very hot) you stop playing. It's not just the air temperature or the wet bulb that's the determinant of the oppressiveness of the conditions.
 
C

Chadillac

Guest
Do tournament orgainzors really think fans and players like 110f? Its more about "being" able to closing the roof than actually closing it (20mins is a specitcal, garage door tech anyone??)

They were saving money on AC like the french does making players play in the rain. They host this tourney for profit, not sport
 

Mr Feeny

Hall of Fame
The problem with what they're doing is that they're measuring air temperature...possibly in a different part of Melbourne. What they probably should be doing is measuring the temperature of the concrete they're playing on...which reflects heat and massively alters the playing conditions. If the surface temperature of the ground gets above (say) 60 degrees (from memory the ground was very hot) you stop playing. It's not just the air temperature or the wet bulb that's the determinant of the oppressiveness of the conditions.

Agree with That, although humidity wouldn't affect surface temp, would it? And it could be stifling.
 

Aussie Darcy

Bionic Poster
The wet bulb is quite a good measure, even if it have difficulties, because it weighs various factors.

The interesting thing is that the wet bulb measurement they use is a daytime measure so thermal comfort does change with nightfall.

So they bascially took the last daytime measurement of 32.7 and kept the roof shut on the basis of that point in time.

Sports Medicine Australia categorises 35 degrees and 30.0 wet bulb measurement as extreme.

For TA it is 40 and 32.5.
Well it is an interesting measurement but in comparison to things like the Djokovic/Monfils match, it's just strange.

What I mean is, ok yes the wet bulb temp was higher but you look at the actual temperature and the conditions and there's just questions over if it's the right policy to have. Perhaps they should have the wet bulb temp rule and then also say "or, if the temperature goes over 40 degrees at the park, players get a 15 minute break" or something along those lines.
 

reaper

Legend
Agree with That, although humidity wouldn't affect surface temp, would it? And it could be stifling.

Probably not...all I know is that given a choice of playing in 40 degrees on grass or hard court, you'd play on grass because it's nowhere near as hot. The tournament officials are pretending there's something magical about 40 degrees that means it's hazardous. It is in one set of conditions but not in another...and that relates to the ground you're standing on and whether the sun is beating down on it.
 

Tommy Haas

Hall of Fame
Does the web bulb test which determines if the roof should be closed use different levels for the men and women? There's an obvious physicality difference between the two sexes, hence the best of 3 versus the best of 5 sets played. It would make sense to have a lower bar for roof closure or even suspend play for women than men.
 

reaper

Legend
Does the web bulb test which determines if the roof should be closed use different levels for the men and women? There's an obvious physicality difference between the two sexes, hence the best of 3 versus the best of 5 sets played. It would make sense to have a lower bar for roof closure or even suspend play for women than men.

There's actually very little difference between men and women in terms of endurance. Much less than power, so no difference in the conditions. The poor little girls weren't wilting like Monfils or Del Potro on the very hot day.
 
What is the weather like in Australia in February? Perhaps they could move the tournament a bit later-late February into March maybe?
 
There's actually very little difference between men and women in terms of endurance. Much less than power, so no difference in the conditions. The poor little girls weren't wilting like Monfils or Del Potro on the very hot day.

Maybe some of them are on their time of the month-causing hot flushes.
 

reaper

Legend
What is the weather like in Australia in February? Perhaps they could move the tournament a bit later-late February into March maybe?

Maybe, but the prominence of the tournament on the Australian sporting landscape comes largely from it being held in the holiday period....which is January. Not saying it couldn't work in terms of crowds and broadcasting revenue, but it may not.
 

metsman

G.O.A.T.
Perhaps having the wet bulb test as the final indicator should be reevaluated considering Novak/Monfils had to play in 40+ heat whilst Cilic/Fed was less than that...
If you're ever in the US, go play, or even just go outside, in say Arizona or California and then in Florida and then let me know what should be reevaluated.

Humidity is a far larger factor in how difficult it is to play than heat. The metric can probably be improved, but Novak/Monfils playing in hotter temperatures is irrelevant. You'd rather play in dryer heat over humidity 20 times out of 10.
 

reaper

Legend
If you're ever in the US, go play, or even just go outside, in say Arizona or California and then in Florida and then let me know what should be reevaluated.

Humidity is a far larger factor in how difficult it is to play than heat. The metric can probably be improved, but Novak/Monfils playing in hotter temperatures is irrelevant. You'd rather play in dryer heat over humidity 20 times out of 10.

I think he lives in Brisbane? No need to leave his own city to find out about humidity.
 
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