Small, Simple fixes

This is a thread for tiny fixes to big problems.

Here’s my journey:
I hurt my wrist turning over a piece of furniture 2.5 years ago. It hurt to hit a forehand for a year and I wore a brace for 1.5 years while I played. During that time I just wanted to survive on my forehand side. For the past year my forehand degraded to the point of embarrassment, and I’ve been obsessing about everything from swing path, to preparation, to Rick Macci videos, Feel Tennis etc etc.

This week I found the solution and it is so simple. During takeback right before the foreword swing, I had my wrist laid back straight. But, there needed to be an angle like this


That small change naturally gave me the inside out (slot) swingpath, allowed me to release the racquet head into the ball, increased topspin, gave shape to the stroke, and has me encouraged about the forehand for the first time in 2.5 years.

Hoping this can help somebody out there. Does anyone else have a similar tiny fix to a big problem?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

5263

G.O.A.T.
so
This is a thread for tiny fixes to big problems.

Here’s my journey:
I hurt my wrist turning over a piece of furniture 2.5 years ago. It hurt to hit a forehand for a year and I wore a brace for 1.5 years while I played. During that time I just wanted to survive on my forehand side. For the past year my forehand degraded to the point of embarrassment, and I’ve been obsessing about everything from swing path, to preparation, to Rick Macci videos, Feel Tennis etc etc.

This week I found the solution and it is so simple. During takeback right before the foreword swing, I had my wrist laid back straight. But, there needed to be an angle like this


That small change naturally gave me the inside out (slot) swingpath, allowed me to release the racquet head into the ball, increased topspin, gave shape to the stroke, and has me encouraged about the forehand for the first time in 2.5 years.

Hoping this can help somebody out there. Does anyone else have a similar tiny fix to a big problem?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
sounds like you learned how to hit the slot properly.....good job and this is one of the most common problems I see out there
 

Kevo

Legend
Congratulations on your success, but I'm not so sure that ulnar deviation is a thing on the forehand. I've never needed to tell anyone I've ever coached to bend their wrist like that. It makes me wonder if there isn't something else going on that you don't realize.

In any case, if it's working for you then keep it up. It's possible that there is a reason specific to your situation that makes it work. I have had a student before that broke his wrist well before he started playing tennis, and we had to modify some things a bit on his serve especially. His wrist alignment was different than the norm.
 
Congratulations on your success, but I'm not so sure that ulnar deviation is a thing on the forehand. I've never needed to tell anyone I've ever coached to bend their wrist like that. It makes me wonder if there isn't something else going on that you don't realize.
Prior to the injury my forehand was my strongest stroke and I controlled the middle of the court with it. I think I guarded that wrist so much during and after the injury that I stayed too tight and forgot how to relax through the swing. The only forehands I hit well over the last year have been the difficult ones where I am stretched. I think old muscle memory took over under stress and the good stuff came out. I’m now using this checkpoint to trick myself back into nice, relaxed technique.
 

Curious

Legend
This is a thread for tiny fixes to big problems.

Here’s my journey:
I hurt my wrist turning over a piece of furniture 2.5 years ago. It hurt to hit a forehand for a year and I wore a brace for 1.5 years while I played. During that time I just wanted to survive on my forehand side. For the past year my forehand degraded to the point of embarrassment, and I’ve been obsessing about everything from swing path, to preparation, to Rick Macci videos, Feel Tennis etc etc.

This week I found the solution and it is so simple. During takeback right before the foreword swing, I had my wrist laid back straight. But, there needed to be an angle like this


That small change naturally gave me the inside out (slot) swingpath, allowed me to release the racquet head into the ball, increased topspin, gave shape to the stroke, and has me encouraged about the forehand for the first time in 2.5 years.

Hoping this can help somebody out there. Does anyone else have a similar tiny fix to a big problem?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
As someone who keeps trying new stuff I experimented this exact thing last week as a solution to the chronic problem of not dropping the racket head below the hand.
 
You have and unknown forehand technique and a fix that seems to improved it.

Do you see what you are doing with your wrist in the corresponding ATP strokes? If not, what stroke technique does it apply to? There are very few identified stroke techniques and they are almost always past or present pro players. Do you use a Semi-Western or Eastern Grip like Federer on your forehand. ??

Were you using high speed video to show your wrist when it goes through the range that you believe is important?

Your wrist in the OP picture appears to have Ulna Deviation maybe near the end of wrist joint Ulna Deviation.

Did you have your wrist injury diagnosed? Did it heal properly with minimal changes?
 
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I am a little bit old school. I use an eastern grip. My coaches growing up said my whole game resembled Guy Forget. I have not used high speed video yet.

As for the injury, it was self diagnosed, but was a pretty textbook TFCC injury. I wore the wrist widget for a long time and eventually it healed with no physical limitations or deformity, etc.
 
I am a little bit old school. I use an eastern grip. My coaches growing up said my whole game resembled Guy Forget. I have not used high speed video yet.

As for the injury, it was self diagnosed, but was a pretty textbook TFCC injury. I wore the wrist widget for a long time and eventually it healed with no physical limitations or deformity, etc.
Sounds like a great outcome from a wrist injury that I've read can be very difficult to recovery from.

To me it seems as if the Semi-Western Grip and Eastern Forehand Grip would stress the wrist in very different ways because of the different directions that the hand and strings face and the angle of the racket shaft to the palm.

Federer has an excellent forehand with a straight elbow and an Eastern Forehand Grip. Suggest that you find a model ATP forehand(s) with your grip and see what technique(s) they are using. You need high speed video to observe the wrist.

If you were to impact the ball with the wrist in ulnar deviation (UD), as shown in your OP picture, there is not much more ulnar deviation to go. The TFCC area might be compressed with more UD. ? I guess that you set it there as described in the OP and it improves your forehand and is not stressful by the time of impact. The video sounds interesting.

Maybe Federer is using your wrist angle? See 12 second and advance single frame through. Ulnar deviation would show better from another camera angle.
On Youtube use the period/comma keys to single frame.

It looks as if the wrist goes into relaxed ulnar deviation when the racket lags. View full screen. Speculating, maybe you were preventing Ulnar Deviation so as not to put pressure on your TFCC injury. ? That is one part of your forehand to compare in detail in videos if your forehand has Federer's technique.

 
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This is a thread for tiny fixes to big problems.

Here’s my journey:
I hurt my wrist turning over a piece of furniture 2.5 years ago. It hurt to hit a forehand for a year and I wore a brace for 1.5 years while I played. During that time I just wanted to survive on my forehand side. For the past year my forehand degraded to the point of embarrassment, and I’ve been obsessing about everything from swing path, to preparation, to Rick Macci videos, Feel Tennis etc etc.

This week I found the solution and it is so simple. During takeback right before the foreword swing, I had my wrist laid back straight. But, there needed to be an angle like this


That small change naturally gave me the inside out (slot) swingpath, allowed me to release the racquet head into the ball, increased topspin, gave shape to the stroke, and has me encouraged about the forehand for the first time in 2.5 years.

Hoping this can help somebody out there. Does anyone else have a similar tiny fix to a big problem?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Are u a lefty?
how was your wrist before? can u make a picture of that to? i may have the same problem...
 
Are u a lefty?
how was your wrist before? can u make a picture of that to? i may have the same problem...
Yep, I am a lefty and never had issues before. It is basically the same now as it was. If you have a TFCC injury, time is the main thing you need to allow it to heal. There is minimal blood flow to those tissues, so it is a slow process.
I highly recommend the Wrist Widget brace. I wore it 24/7 for a few months and then wore it while I played for over a year after that.
 
Yep, I am a lefty and never had issues before. It is basically the same now as it was. If you have a TFCC injury, time is the main thing you need to allow it to heal. There is minimal blood flow to those tissues, so it is a slow process.
I highly recommend the Wrist Widget brace. I wore it 24/7 for a few months and then wore it while I played for over a year after that.
sorry I meant how your wrist was when it didnt worked. like 90 degrees laid back? and now u just go like 45 degrees?
 
sorry I meant how your wrist was when it didnt worked. like 90 degrees laid back? and now u just go like 45 degrees?
Kind-of. the whole difference is that instead of my wrist being laid straight back (like it would be if I were doing push-ups) I am tilting the racquet tip toward the ulna (pinky side of the forearm) as well. This feels like it pre-loads the racquet face to release into the ball.
 
Kind-of. the whole difference is that instead of my wrist being laid straight back (like it would be if I were doing push-ups) I am tilting the racquet tip toward the ulna (pinky side of the forearm) as well. This feels like it pre-loads the racquet face to release into the ball.
ok, I understand.
when are you doing the tilting towards the pinky? already at the start of the backswing or at the end? or in between?
 
ok, I understand.
when are you doing the tilting towards the pinky? already at the start of the backswing or at the end? or in between?
I think just at the end. I am still in the discovery phase and haven’t worked all of that out yet. It will be a process rebuilding what has been broken for the past 2.5 years. The good news is that I was winning with a broken forehand, so I am excited about what fixing it is going to do for my game.
 
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