so ceramic means fiberglass ?

PistolPete23

Professional
so ceramic means fiberglass ?
The stress-bearing material in fiberglass composites is SiO2, which is categorized as a ceramic in the most technical sense. But colloquially, and in the materials engineering world, it's almost never referred to as a ceramic because glass is so commonplace. Ceramics is a broad category of materials that are usually touted for their extremely high strengths (higher than metals), but in their bulk form they're also much more brittle than metals (yes, a material can be both strong and brittle). Some common examples of engineering ceramics are alumina (Al2O3), titanium carbide (TiC), and zirconia (ZrO2).
 
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dje31

Professional
Reminds me of when pretty much all MFRs were putting Titanium in the composite mix...always wondered just how much, and suspected next to none. Kind of like Graphene.

Funnily enough, and showing how cycles repeat themselves, next season's alpine skis are putting Ti back in the mix. Watch for Ti to make a big comeback in racquets...just a matter of time.
 

yonexRx32

Semi-Pro
Reminds me of when pretty much all MFRs were putting Titanium in the composite mix...always wondered just how much, and suspected next to none. Kind of like Graphene.

Funnily enough, and showing how cycles repeat themselves, next season's alpine skis are putting Ti back in the mix. Watch for Ti to make a big comeback in racquets...just a matter of time.
What form of Ti? Ti carbide, Ti oxide, metallic Ti? What are we talking about?
 

PistolPete23

Professional
What form of Ti? Ti carbide, Ti oxide, metallic Ti? What are we talking about?
Hard to say, you really have to check the patents. Since it was a trend at the time and not really functional, I wouldn’t be surprised if some manufacturers were creative in how they incorporated the Ti. For example, titanium oxide is often added to paints.

When Head did it in the late 90s, marketing the tech as "The Power of Light," they showed a carbon fiber decal at the throat with silver colored Ti fibers woven in. I used to think it was a legitimate part of the layup but knowledgeable people on this forum assured me that it was just a sticker for cosmetics :rolleyes:. Incidentally, Ti is actually "heavier" than carbon fiber, so you know it was completely a marketing gimmick.
 
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