Socks to prevent blisters

Discussion in 'Shoes and Apparel' started by iceman_dl6, Jun 1, 2013.

  1. iceman_dl6

    iceman_dl6 Semi-Pro

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    Hi all,

    I have been struggling with blisters in the outside of the small toes esp since it is hot. Any sock suggestions?

    Thanks!
     
    #1
  2. Rozroz

    Rozroz G.O.A.T.

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    NOT Thorlos.
    i started using the Thorlos as 2nd sock, wearing a thin sock as 1st.
    much better.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2013
    #2
  3. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    That sounds more like a shoe problem. You need to look for a better fit.
     
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  4. iceman_dl6

    iceman_dl6 Semi-Pro

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    Don't think so, i don't have this problem in the winter. I'm sure it's the Nike cotton crew socks that are the culprit.
     
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  5. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

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    Wear two pairs.
     
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  6. tennisfu

    tennisfu Rookie

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    Double up. You could also tape your toes if you want. Its a bit uncomfortable but works well.
     
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  7. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    Thorlos are the best, you only need to wear one pair. They last 10-20 times longer then the others and are worth the extra cost.
     
    #7
  8. Rozroz

    Rozroz G.O.A.T.

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    completely disagree. they may hold longer, but they are too "woolly" and i can feel myself sweat and slip in them. 2 socks are best IMO.
     
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  9. NJ1

    NJ1 Professional

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    This thread shows how everyone has their own preferences with regards to socks. I do not like Thorlos or wearing double socks, as I find neither option offers breathability nor feel.

    My favorite socks are the hard to find Nike tennis socks which are 80% cotton but very thick yet well vented along the top. After those, I really like the more synthetic but equally breathable Nike Dri-Fit half cushion sold by TW. I used to get blisters too but wearing either of these socks means my feet are far happier.

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Nike_Dri-Fit_Crew_Socks_3-Pack_Wh_Gy_LG/descpageMANIKE-NMDFCRWG.html
     
    #9
  10. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

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    Its not rocket science....If you are really having problems...

    1. Rub petrolleum jelly into your feet (Chang did this)

    2. Put on socks

    3. Put on another pair (almost all pros wear 2 pairs)

    4. Finish with third pair of thin nylon/polyester dress socks

    When you are out playing change your socks once in a while.
     
    #10
  11. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Nope, I find Thorlos to be the WORST! They are so slippery inside and out that they make my feet slide inside the sock and the sock slide inside the shoe both of which lead to lots of toe jamming and black-and-blue toes. Ouch! Thorlos also make your feet very hot due to being very thick and made of acrylic. Once I switched away from Thorlos to socks made mostly of cotton, my toe jamming problems went away. Thorlos also don't last long as areas near the toes start wearing away and thinning out quickly.
     
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  12. NJ1

    NJ1 Professional

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    Source? Sounds like you just made this up. Federer wears two pairs, but just off the top of my head I can tell you that Nadal, Murray and Tipsarevic wear just one pair.
     
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  13. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

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    Chang, Courier, Agassi, Corretja, Moya, Sampras, Rafter etc. etc.

    I watch a lot of old matches from my library. Watch them on the chang-overs. Rafter would sweat through shoes and have to go to a dry pair all the time. I have no clue about the newer players you just mentioned. They probably all have there feet tape nowadays.

    Really...its pretty common in all sports though.

    Long distance runner use duct tape to protect there feet from blisters. It works for tennis too. I used to get blood blisters the size of half dollars on the balls of my feet in the summer on hardcourts. I little duct tape fixed that. Athletic tape can work but doesnt hold up as well one its soaked through.

    Dont you guys take extra socks and shoes to the court?
     
    #13
  14. TennisLovaLova

    TennisLovaLova Hall of Fame

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    for tennis and running I use dri fit socks , but I also put some talc or micoderm powder in the shoes, to keep the feet dry.

    and also, before wearing the socks, I always apply some vaseline where I used to have blisters
    I've been doing this for the past few years, now I have calluses there, so I only do this as a preventive method I guess and I dont have blisters any more, except maybe sometimes on the heel
     
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  15. Geology_Rocks!

    Geology_Rocks! Semi-Pro

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    I only use Thorlos and never had this foot sliding problem, also never had a black/blue toe in my life.

    I only have blisters when I use cotton.
     
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  16. NJ1

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    Interesting to hear. That's an accomplished list of players no doubt. I'm just not sure how common it is anymore though, as I can't think of anyone but Federer in the current top pro-field.

    For what it's worth, out of the seven or eight guys (small sample size, I know) I play with regularly, nobody double socks either.

    I tried duct tape once when I had a bad blister but found it came off (I like Mueller athletic tape better) , likely due to me having very sweaty feet. I never change shoes or socks during a match though, and my feet seem more resilient now and combined with the current shoe/sock setup don't blister anymore (if I had to play three hour matches on consecutive days it would likely be different).

    As I said earlier, there's no right or wrong way as foot happiness is very subjective.
     
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  17. Tennis Truth

    Tennis Truth Rookie

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    When cotton is wet it can be abrasive.

    I wear two pairs of socks. Thorlos's as a first layer, with cotton on top of that. This works the best for me. I never get blisters or excessive rubbing.

    I have tried two pairs of cotton, but it rubs too much.

    I'll admit there is little to no breathability, but I'm willing to sacrafice that for an otherwise comfortable setup.
     
    #17
  18. miraq

    miraq New User

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    Hmmm... Interesting variety of solutions! My shoe brand selection process used to be very difficult due to blisters with almost any brand, now it seems any brand is fine, with no blisters. I use the two sock method, one thin polypropylene first, cotton or cotton poly blend on top, no blisters! Inner sock just slips around against the outer, works for tennis and running.
     
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  19. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

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    Once you play enough and your feet become a big callus blisters ussually are not a regular issue.

    Be careful with calluses too though. I let one go to far once and brused a bone in my foot! I had to take a scalpul and sandpaper and thin them out a bit.

    The biggest threat is wet feet on hot, hot hard courts. When you can fry an egg on the court surface you need to keep your feet dry. Change your socks and if necessary your shoes once in a while.

    We need to start a bag thread so some of you guys know to keep the right stuff in your bag for stuff like this. KY or Petroleum Jelly is also something you need to keep in there. Not for some kinky sex thing but for on court treatment for various things.
     
    #19
  20. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    That's almost unheard of for a serious tennis player. Maybe it's different on clay since you slide into your shots instead of stopping abruptly like on hardcourts so your shoe grips the court and stops but your foot keep moving so your toes jam into the front of the inside of the shoe.
     
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  21. mikeler

    mikeler Moderator

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    Nope, my toe still jams sometimes even when I slide into my shot.
     
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  22. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

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    The old solution for this is to have a shoe half a size bigger and wear more socks. Keeping your laces tight help as well.

    I have had it as well. It sucks. Make sure you keep your toenails nice and short as we. I have seen players complain about this and their big toenail looks like they could use it as a shovel.

    By the way thats another thing you need to keep in your bag.....toenail clippers.
     
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  23. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Actually, I think the solution is the opposite - wear smaller shoes. Bigger shoes just cause more foot movement inside the shoe, which makes it easier for your foot to side around inside the shoe. It also gives your foot more distance to accelerate forward thereby picking up speed until it slams into the front of your shoe. Smaller/tighter shoes minimize your feet from sliding around inside of the shoe.
     
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  24. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

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    Never tried it. I would think they would stretch out but like I said...never tried it. I picked up the larger shoe bit from "Winning Ugly" I think. I think I wore three pais of socks to tighten up the side to side fit. I might have used some thinker insoles as well to elevate my foot a little. Anyways...it worked. I have not had any issues with it in a long time though as I keep my toenail all the way trimmed to the pink.

    I am sure a lot of this depends on the makeup of ones feet. Everybody is a little different. Some people with really long toes strugle with this stuff.

    I guess if its bad enough you could just rip out your toenails :shock:.
     
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  25. NJ1

    NJ1 Professional

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    Going to have to dispute the bolded as being inaccurate backyard physics. Your foot doesn't continue to accelerate past what is caused by the initial stopping force.

    I'm with Magnut, generally a 1/2 size up is better. But of course, there are exceptions and it's all about what works for your feet.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2013
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  26. niktub

    niktub Professional

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    shoes with perfect feet

    perfect fit...
    will allow you to wear one pair of socks.
    V9 tour are perfect for my narrow feet.
     
    #26
  27. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    If your shoes are small and tight and your toes are already touching the front of the shoe when you're standing, when your shoe grips the court and stops abruptly, your toes cannot move forward very much relative to the shoe since the front of the shoe is preventing them from moving forward relative to the shoe. However, if you have a lot of space between your toes and the front of the shoe, when you stop, your foot will accelerate and slide forward relative to the shoe until your toes jam into the front of the shoe and your foot stops (sudden deceleration).

    I never said your foot "continues to accelerate". I said your foot "accelerates". Big difference. "Picking up speed" = "acceleration". Not an increase in the rate of acceleration.

    A tighter shoe is like having a seat belt taut across your body versus having the seat belt 3 feet in front of your body. When you slam head-on into a solid wall, which will cause more damage to your torso? In the 1st case, the taut seat belt will prevent your body from moving forward very much relative to the car. In the 2nd case, nothing is restraining you so your body will accelerate forward from a standstill relative to the car to a high rate of speed until it slams into the seat belt 3 feet in front of you.
     
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  28. NJ1

    NJ1 Professional

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    You said this: "It also gives your foot more distance to accelerate forward thereby picking up speed until it slams into the front of your shoe."

    I said: "Your foot doesn't continue to accelerate past what is caused by the initial stopping force."

    Your foot does not pick up speed (same as continue to accelerate, acceleration is continuous by definition fyi), but you said it did.

    Your foot may still end up hitting the front of a shoe whether it's tight or loose (unless it doesn't reach or if the shoe is part of your foot, which is impossible), but it doesn't hit it harder in the latter. Personal preference is all that matters.

    The car crash analogy, well let's just say it's not the best. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2013
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  29. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    Wash them before you play in them competitively and they won't slip. Trim your toe nails and they wont cut into the material.

    So what sock do you like?
     
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  30. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Huh? "Picking up speed" = an increase in velocity (rate of speed) = "acceleration".

    When your foot goes from a velocity of zero (relative to your shoe) to a velocity of, let's say 20 ft/sec (relative to your shoe), it has obviously "picked up speed" or "accelerated". When your shoes are tight and your toes are already touching the front of your shoe when you're standing, your foot obviously do not have the space to "pick up speed" relative to the shoe, but if you have a lot of space in front of your toes, they do.

    Try this test. Park your car inside your garage so that the front bumper is touching the back wall of your garage. Now get into your car and floor it. Then back up your car to the end of your driveway and then floor it again towards the back wall inside your garage. Which scenario do you think will cause more damage to the front of your car?
     
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  31. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    My Thorlo socks have gone through many washings and they are still extremely slippery. It is due to the mostly acrylic material used and to the thickness, which causes the sock to "shear" on itself when you abruptly stop.

    I prefer socks that are mostly made of cotton. One example are tennis socks made by Nike that were sold a few years ago.
     
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  32. NJ1

    NJ1 Professional

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    You seem to like car analogies so try this:

    a)You drive your car for 0.1 mile at 30mph and then hit a wall.

    b)You drive your car for 300 miles at 30mph and then hit a wall.

    Force into the wall is the same. But the car scenarios are silly so it's best to move on from them (that said, your last one is better than the seat belt one which is in no way comparable to toe jamming for myriad reasons.)

    Your shoes are not part of your feet. If your feet touch the end of your shoes due to a hard stop they hit the end of the shoe with the same force as if they'd travelled 1/2 inch and hit the end. They don't "speed up". This is what I said in my first post; the force comes from the stop.

    But the whole point is moot though, people size up so their toes do NOT touch the end during stops. That's the point of doing so.

    By the way, Like you I also like the mostly cotton Nike tennis socks.

    We can disagree on the rest, it's all good. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2013
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  33. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    My own observations:

    Thorlos are made from soft acrylic yarn that will not compress anywhere near as much as cotton does when it gets soaked with perspiration.

    Thorlo tennis socks are extra thick along the forefoot and heel to provide extra cushioning, and resist the wear seen in inexpensive socks.

    Thorlo tennis socks are thinner along the top of the foot to allow for ventilation and evaporation.

    Many will have to go up a half size in their shoe to accomadate the thickness of level three Thorlo socks.


    The laces on tennis shoes need to be quite tight to keep the foot/sock from slipping inside the shoe.

    They always need to be re-tightened after a short warmup, as the foot/sock shifts inside the shoe, and even acrylic yarns will compress a bit with sweat.

    Toenails have to be cut very short in tennis players to prevent black toes.
     
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  34. Tennisguy3000

    Tennisguy3000 Semi-Pro

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    #34
  35. mikeler

    mikeler Moderator

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    Pretty much my experience but the socks do need to be thrown out every few months because they wear down.
     
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  36. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Sorry but bad analogy because not both cars are moving at 30mph. The car that traveled 300 miles is moving at 30mph but the car that barely traveled at all is hardly moving at all, i.e., ~ zero mph. That would be the correct analogy.

    Like I said earlier, when your foot starts off already touching the front of your shoe, there is no distance to allow your foot to increase its velocity relative to the shoe. Your foot starts at a velocity of zero relative to the shoe, and since there is no space for your foot to move, the terminal velocity of your foot (when your toes hit the front of your shoe) relative to the shoe is also close to zero. Thus, your foot has almost no momentum (p=mv) relative to the shoe. However, if there is a lot of space between your toes and the front of your shoe, that distance allows your foot to accelerate forward relative to the shoe when your shoe stops suddenly since your foot goes from an initial velocity of zero relative to your shoe to some finite positive terminal velocity when your toes hit the front of your shoe. And when an object goes from an initial velocity of zero to a finite positive velocity, it has accelerated. This positive momentum of your foot slamming into the front of your shoe will cause damage to your toes.

    So a better analogy would be:

    1. Car is initially at a standstill but is already touching the wall so it hits the wall at a velocity of ~ 0 mph.

    2. Car is initially at a standstill but then it accelerates towards the wall which is 500 ft away until it reaches a terminal velocity of 60 mph when it hits the wall.

    Which scenario would cause more damage to the front of your car?

    You do understand that the longer the runway, the faster your velocity is at the end of the runway when you're accelerating, right? Just like if you floor the gas pedal of your car, you may be traveling at only 20 mph after 100 ft but will reach 100 mph after a 1/4 mile, right? :)
     
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  37. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    Given the materials shoes are made of there is always room for a nasty collision between foot and shoe however close the foot is to the wall.

    Isn't the best situation one where the width is snug but there is length such that the foot can move but not touch the wall of the shoe, or at least minimize touching.

    Resolution 4 with its elfin fit was probably designed along these lines.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2013
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  38. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    This is what running warehouse writes:


    Once you have your new shoes on, check the following to ensure your new shoes fit properly:

    The heel should fit snugly with no slippage.
    The mid-foot - the area under the arch and over your instep - should fit comfortably snug but not too tight.
    The toe-box should have enough room to wiggle your toes.
    Because feet swell during a run, allow a thumbnail's width between the length of your longest toe and the end of the shoe.
    Moving from the ankle forward, the material of shoe around your foot should go from fitted, to relaxed, to loose around the toes. The material should not be taut around the ball of the foot. If it is taut, then you need a wider shoe.
     
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  39. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    Good analysis! My experiences also. Consistency is a big part of winning tennis. I don't like to think about my equipment while I'm playing, too many other things to be thinking about like tactics and strategy. Thorlos are consistent and top quality. I know if I need to buy a pair on the road, they are ubiquitous and can be found at any running store and most tennis and sporting good stores. I used to wear two pairs of the Costco Heads that were cheap and thick when new but after a few washings thinned out. My coach who was on the Pro Tour turned me onto them and said I would only need to wear one pair. (I think Hewit would wear three pair at a time, I don't know which brand).

    If I don't cut my nails, they will act as a saw on the toe but that's my fault. I get them mended and they are good to go again. There may be better (but not by much) but can you find them easily on the road or in the club pro-shop when you forget yours just before you need to play a tournament match? You can put Ferraris on your feet but the Dodges will get you cross-country, (although they are both owned by the same company, Fiat, although I don't think I would want to drive a Fiat 500 Abarth cross country either, a Jeep Wrangler would be first choice and they're owned by Chrysler/Fiat too--but I digress--socks?).
     
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  40. NJ1

    NJ1 Professional

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    The rates are fixed. Amazing you cannot see that, but not surprising. For your sake I hope you're being deliberately obtuse, though I pity you if your car cannot get to well over 30mph in a tenth of a mile.

    I tried the let's agree to disagree thing and I've humored you enough. With more than 36,000 posts it's clear you won't admit you struggle to comprehend things, or even that you wrote the things you wrote. You'll come back with more drivel, which applies in no way, that you goggled to try and sound smart.

    Final time: 1) larger shoes mean your foot DOESN'T touches the end. 2) your foot does not "pick up speed" inside your shoe. It's not a car, it does not have an engine and an accelerator pushing it along. The only energy is from the stop and that is the same regardless of having 2" of space in the shoe or 1/4 inch. Just like a thrown ball doesn't pick up speed past the point of release; this is incredibly simple stuff.

    I'm going to move on from you and this blackhole you create on the internet, but I will just remind you that you brought up a body hitting a seatbelt as an example of a foot hitting the front of a shoe. Embarrassing. In no way can the two be compared. Spend less time on online forums, it's really no way to live, and go work on buying a better car. ;)
     
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  41. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    "a tenth of a mile"? I said ZERO miles. Your car is already touching the wall, i.e., there is zero distance between your car and the wall. Thus, it has no space to speed up.

    Yet, you can't seem to comprehend that when a object starts at a standstill and then reaches a finite terminal velocity, that it has in fact, accelerated. Oh, and I certainly don't need Google to sound smart. I learned my physics long before Google ever existed. And I don't think the laws of physics have changed.

    1)Unless you tie your shoes incredibly tight, your foot will keep sliding inside your shoe until it is stopped by the front of your shoe (ignoring frictional forces). Don't you remember Newton's 1st Law of Motion? An object in motion will remain in motion unless acted upon by a force?

    2) Your foot absolutely picks up speed inside the shoe. When your foot starts at a standstill relative to your shoe (velocity = 0) and then moves at a finite positive velocity, by definition, it has picked up speed (accelerated). If it takes 2 inches for your foot to reach its maximum velocity, at between 0 to 2 inches your foot is moving at less than maximum velocity. Thus, the more space you have to travel between 0 and 2 inches, the greater the terminal velocity at impact. And the greater the terminal velocity, the greater the momentum your foot has when it slams into the front of your shoe.

    What does throwing a ball have to do with it? Wrong analogy.

    Very similar scenarios. Both have an object that starts at a velocity of zero relative to its "housing" and then it suddenly accelerates to some finite positive velocity until another force acts upon it to stop it (either the seat belt or the front of your shoe).
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2013
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  42. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Running is completely different from tennis. You don't stop suddenly and abruptly when you go running as you do in tennis. That's when toe jamming occurs in tennis - when your shoe grips the court but your foot inside the shoe keeps moving.

    I understand Nadal wears two sizes smaller than his normal shoe size to minimize this problem.
     
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  43. NJ1

    NJ1 Professional

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    This, like everything you wrote above, is complete rubbish. You must be a great engineer (not being able to read, thinking your toes hit the end on sized up shoes, thinking the seat belt analogy is a good one!). But I must not take your precious last word, as I already feel like a bully given that this place is such a huge part of your life. Breakpoint, you may be unsuccessful in the real world but you are the...

    [​IMG]
     
    #43
  44. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    #44
  45. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    I'm certainly not the only one as it's quite common.

     
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  46. NJ1

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    You are priceless. So twisted you'll claim a 10 is 3 sizes smaller than an 11.5. That would be 3 HALF sizes, brains. But, like your other theories, the point is moot as it is NOT true. Nadal himself has long laughed at this fallacy.

    As for the ONE person you dug up that agrees with sizing down, good job. As I've said ad nauseam, certain things work for certain people and they should wear what is best for them. Better luck next time on that "engineer's" test where they ask if you should build on a) sand or b)rock. Now go outside and get some much-needed fresh air.

    I really am done with you now, as "you cannot be serious." :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2013
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  47. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

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    I would ecourage anyone out there to try a shoe three sizes small and not get blisters. I cant even get my foot in a shoe three sizes small.

    You fellas are some freaky footed tennis players!
     
    #47
  48. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Um...is not 11.5 a shoe size? Is not 11 a shoe size? Is not 10.5 a shoe size? Is not 10 a shoe size? Yes? Then, YES, size 10 is THREE sizes smaller than size 11.5!

    I wear size 10.5. When I "go down a size", I go down to size 10, NOT to size 9.5! When I "go up a size", I go up to size 11, NOT to size 11.5! You sound as if you've never bought shoes before or at least anything other than your exact size every time.

    Oh, and if you do a search, you'll find plenty of people who jam their toes with bigger shoes than with smaller shoes. Minimizing your foot's movement inside your shoes is what prevents toe jamming. If your foot has no room to slide forward, they cannot gain the momentum to slam violently into the front of your shoe.
     
    #48
  49. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2007
    Messages:
    3,463
    I might be late to this party but I think .5 is half a size, not a whole size. If I was in a shoe store and a shoe felt tight, I would tell the salesperson, "Let's try half a size larger, not a size larger. Just my 2 cents, not taking sides since I haven't read all of it, been in my own ******* match at a health forum.
     
    #49
  50. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    2,737
    I think we all know what Breakpoint meant by 3 sizes. Obvioussly your not going to wear a size 7 if you usually wear a size 10. An 8.5 would be hard enough. Honestly...I wear 10.5. I dont think I can get my foot in a 9. I dont really want to try either. You guys are foot fettish freaks. Just cut your toenails short for gods sake. Tape some little Barbie pillows on them if you have to.
     
    #50

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