Sore Achilles Tendons

#6
I have trouble with this as a result of all the sudden accelerations, especially since I serve and volley. Any tips on how to deal with this?
I am convinced insole replacements saved my Achilles years ago, and have used them ever since. I use Sof Sole Airr Orthodic ... it has some cushion in the heel ... will make shoes heavier though.

This one:

https://www.amazon.com/Sof-Sole-Ort...h Performance Shoe Insoles, Men's Size 9-10.5

I have also experimented with slighly raising heel with thin insert under insole (I just cut out heels of original cheap thin insoles and put it under the Sof Soles. I read about this years ago ... the theory is it reduces the flex of foot up, which reduces pull on Achilles. Not sure if that is "a real thing", but felt fine so I stuck with it. At a minimum, a little extra cushion.
 
#7
I am convinced insole replacements saved my Achilles years ago, and have used them ever since. I use Sof Sole Airr Orthodic ... it has some cushion in the heel ... will make shoes heavier though.

This one:

https://www.amazon.com/Sof-Sole-Ort...h Performance Shoe Insoles, Men's Size 9-10.5

I have also experimented with slighly raising heel with thin insert under insole (I just cut out heels of original cheap thin insoles and put it under the Sof Soles. I read about this years ago ... the theory is it reduces the flex of foot up, which reduces pull on Achilles. Not sure if that is "a real thing", but felt fine so I stuck with it. At a minimum, a little extra cushion.
Why don’t you buy just heel cups ?
 
#8
Why don’t you buy just heel cups ?
If you mean instead of Sof Sole insoles, the insoles that come with tennis shoes these days are cr@p.

If you mean instead of cutting out heal from original insoles, I like the fact that the original insoles are a perfect fit ... you don't want them sliding around. Also ... when I read about the insert idea years ago, the idea was you didn't need much adjustment ... i.e. use thin pieces, when is exactly what the original cr@p insoles are. You probably could add more cushioning that way ... but the Sof Soles already have a gel bubble at the heel. In the case of the Achilles ... I also read the raised heel is probably more important than cushioning. If you start with raised cushioning, and it breaks down (goes flatter) than you are back with more foot angle. :eek:
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
#9
If you mean instead of Sof Sole insoles, the insoles that come with tennis shoes these days are cr@p.

If you mean instead of cutting out heal from original insoles, I like the fact that the original insoles are a perfect fit ... you don't want them sliding around. Also ... when I read about the insert idea years ago, the idea was you didn't need much adjustment ... i.e. use thin pieces, when is exactly what the original cr@p insoles are. You probably could add more cushioning that way ... but the Sof Soles already have a gel bubble at the heel. In the case of the Achilles ... I also read the raised heel is probably more important than cushioning. If you start with raised cushioning, and it breaks down (goes flatter) than you are back with more foot angle. :eek:
When I had achilles tendonitis the podiatrist gave me a pr of cork flat heel lifts to use temporarily until my orthotics arrived. Noticed Powerstep insoles have a heel lift. Btw, still have a custom night splint from those days that gave relief after about three weeks.
 
#10
If you mean instead of Sof Sole insoles, the insoles that come with tennis shoes these days are cr@p.

If you mean instead of cutting out heal from original insoles, I like the fact that the original insoles are a perfect fit ... you don't want them sliding around. Also ... when I read about the insert idea years ago, the idea was you didn't need much adjustment ... i.e. use thin pieces, when is exactly what the original cr@p insoles are. You probably could add more cushioning that way ... but the Sof Soles already have a gel bubble at the heel. In the case of the Achilles ... I also read the raised heel is probably more important than cushioning. If you start with raised cushioning, and it breaks down (goes flatter) than you are back with more foot angle. :eek:
I mean she like that:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sorbothane-Heel-Large-Absorbing-Fasciitis/dp/B07FBX5RYV
 
#13
I have trouble with this as a result of all the sudden accelerations, especially since I serve and volley. Any tips on how to deal with this?
In the past I've had off-and-on soreness like you're describing. I think there's probably something to the idea of insoles and aside from the potential benefits of raising the heels just a little bit, I know that I've benefited from improved ankle alignment. If my feet pronate in my shoes too much, that's rough on my achilles.

Insoles can help to get good vertical ankle alignment, but I've also found it with certain shoes. The difference in comfort has been substantial enough for me that I prioritize good ankle alignment above anything along the lines of ample cushioning in a shoe. Even if they're built with a relatively thin sole and ride low-to-the-ground, they feel great if they let my ankles set nice and straight.
 
#14
I've got one. Interestingly, it's easier to balance on one foot in the center of the board than with 2 feet on the outside. I'd imagine surfers and skiiers would find this easy.

To make it more difficult, stand on one foot and attach an elastic band between both ankles and move your foot that's not on the board outward and inward. Or maybe try juggling [preferably not flaming chainsaws]. It works leg muscles you didn't know you had.
 
#15
I've got one. Interestingly, it's easier to balance on one foot in the center of the board than with 2 feet on the outside. I'd imagine surfers and skiiers would find this easy.

To make it more difficult, stand on one foot and attach an elastic band between both ankles and move your foot that's not on the board outward and inward. Or maybe try juggling [preferably not flaming chainsaws]. It works leg muscles you didn't know you had.
 
#21
I've had this problem for the last 6 or 7 years now. I've tried everything. The only thing that has helped even the smallest amount has been that I no longer play on consecutive days. The only good news I have is that I've been told by doctors that people with bad Achilles tendonitis are not necessarily any more likely to tear their Achilles than anyone else.
 
#22
I've had this problem for the last 6 or 7 years now. I've tried everything. The only thing that has helped even the smallest amount has been that I no longer play on consecutive days. The only good news I have is that I've been told by doctors that people with bad Achilles tendonitis are not necessarily any more likely to tear their Achilles than anyone else.
What does "everything" consist of?
 
#23
What does "everything" consist of?
Rest, time off to recover, different shoes, insoles, heel cups, ankle braces, stretching, calf strengthening, massage, massage roller, and even changing my stance on my backhand to name a few things. If I had to pick just a couple things that have seemed to help the most, I'd probably go with the stretching and massage roller. They have not stopped or even lessened the pain, just maybe slowed down further development of it. My Achilles pain is generally somewhere between a 2.5-3.5 out of 10 while playing and much higher the next day. It decreases quite a bit two days after playing and then slowly goes away almost completely over time if I don't play for a while. Comes back immediately on my first time back playing though (even once after giving it a 3 month break). I've learned to just put up with it for the most part, but I just can't play singles two days in a row any more.
 
#24
Rest, time off to recover, different shoes, insoles, heel cups, ankle braces, stretching, calf strengthening, massage, massage roller, and even changing my stance on my backhand to name a few things. If I had to pick just a couple things that have seemed to help the most, I'd probably go with the stretching and massage roller. They have not stopped or even lessened the pain, just maybe slowed down further development of it. My Achilles pain is generally somewhere between a 2.5-3.5 out of 10 while playing and much higher the next day. It decreases quite a bit two days after playing and then slowly goes away almost completely over time if I don't play for a while. Comes back immediately on my first time back playing though (even once after giving it a 3 month break). I've learned to just put up with it for the most part, but I just can't play singles two days in a row any more.
Have you tried foam rolling your calves and hamstrings before you go to the court ... and dynamic stretches at the court? I think if I was feeling Achilles pain ... I would probably roll the foot over a tennis ball before also. It's amazing the knots you find in calves and forearms when you roll them ... that you had no idea were there.
 
#25
Rest, time off to recover, different shoes, insoles, heel cups, ankle braces, stretching, calf strengthening, massage, massage roller, and even changing my stance on my backhand to name a few things. If I had to pick just a couple things that have seemed to help the most, I'd probably go with the stretching and massage roller. They have not stopped or even lessened the pain, just maybe slowed down further development of it. My Achilles pain is generally somewhere between a 2.5-3.5 out of 10 while playing and much higher the next day. It decreases quite a bit two days after playing and then slowly goes away almost completely over time if I don't play for a while. Comes back immediately on my first time back playing though (even once after giving it a 3 month break). I've learned to just put up with it for the most part, but I just can't play singles two days in a row any more.
I noticed that missing from your list was "getting an MRI and talking to a orthopedist and perhaps also a Physical Therapist".
 
#26
If we’re talking about preventing soreness, I think the key is to stretch, both before and after playing, and to keep the calf muscles (and therefore achilles tendon) strong with targeted exercises. Another important thing is to keep the foot muscles strong. People with weak foot/arch muscles are much more likely to hyperextend the achilles because when pushing off all of the stress gets placed on the achilles if you have a weak arch.
 
#28
Have you tried foam rolling your calves and hamstrings before you go to the court ... and dynamic stretches at the court? I think if I was feeling Achilles pain ... I would probably roll the foot over a tennis ball before also. It's amazing the knots you find in calves and forearms when you roll them ... that you had no idea were there.
I use this guy for rolling my calves and it seems like the best thing I've found for slowing down the pain: https://www.amazon.com/Stick-Sprinter-Flexibility-Therapeutic-Potentially/dp/B016ZHDOCC?th=1

I have not tried rolling my feet over a tennis ball... I will have to add that to the repertoire!
 
#29
I use this guy for rolling my calves and it seems like the best thing I've found for slowing down the pain: https://www.amazon.com/Stick-Sprinter-Flexibility-Therapeutic-Potentially/dp/B016ZHDOCC?th=1

I have not tried rolling my feet over a tennis ball... I will have to add that to the repertoire!
I have a stick roller ... use it for forearms and triceps regularly ... since TE 2 years ago.

Started foam rolling calves and hamstrings after hamstring injury (twice).

IMO ... you will get a better calf and hamstring massage with a foam roller because you can use body weight to your advantage. Lots of good foam roller youtube videos.

I just added this one, I want a smooth one with some give (not max firm). I only do one leg at a time ... so short is good. For both legs at same time (foam rolling more awkward than you would guess) ... you need a longer one.

This one:

https://www.amazon.com/Yes4All-Foam...Mwebp_QL65&keywords=foam+roller+yes4all&psc=1

Good luck ... I am now the guy that needs 20 minute tennis prep before I leave the house, and 5-10 minute dynamic stretches at the court only to still play 60 year old tennis. :mad:

I played a guy regularly ... probably mid 40s that had a complete Achilles tear years before. He ran on clay court like he had never had the injury. Another friend popped his warming up in a tournament ... and he came back 100%.
 
#30
I have a stick roller ... use it for forearms and triceps regularly ... since TE 2 years ago.

Started foam rolling calves and hamstrings after hamstring injury (twice).

IMO ... you will get a better calf and hamstring massage with a foam roller because you can use body weight to your advantage. Lots of good foam roller youtube videos.

I just added this one, I want a smooth one with some give (not max firm). I only do one leg at a time ... so short is good. For both legs at same time (foam rolling more awkward than you would guess) ... you need a longer one.

This one:

https://www.amazon.com/Yes4All-Foam...Mwebp_QL65&keywords=foam+roller+yes4all&psc=1

Good luck ... I am now the guy that needs 20 minute tennis prep before I leave the house, and 5-10 minute dynamic stretches at the court only to still play 60 year old tennis. :mad:

I played a guy regularly ... probably mid 40s that had a complete Achilles tear years before. He ran on clay court like he had never had the injury. Another friend popped his warming up in a tournament ... and he came back 100%.
Thanks for all the info! I am curious though: how do you use the stick roller for forearms and triceps? With help from another person?
 
#31
Thanks for all the info! I am curious though: how do you use the stick roller for forearms and triceps? With help from another person?
I stick one end straight down wedged in the top corner of a leather couch (crease between back rest and top corner of couch). Roller is vertical ... just roll my arm horizontal.

You can also just put one end on the edge of table edge, and your arm pressure will keep it in place.

@03:00 below

 
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