Spin Classes for tennis fitness

stethemint

New User
I was just wondering how beneficial spin classes would be for tennis fitness? They run everyday in my gym for free and I'm considering doing it everyday ( I think they are 30 min sessions ). There is also HIIT classes but I've seen them and they look pretty terrible like for old women. What is everybody's recommendations for conditioning training for a top level tennis player?
 

chic

Rookie
Just sat in on a spin class at the Y with my mom over Thanksgiving (she's become a big spin person the past year). Definitely a great leg and cardio workout, and low impact which is probably a good thing for any tennis player.

Upsides: good cardio, building leg muscles, helping develop quicker feet

Downsides: being on a bike is very stable so not working any stabilizer/ balancing muscles.

I would say try it out for a week!
 

stethemint

New User
Just sat in on a spin class at the Y with my mom over Thanksgiving (she's become a big spin person the past year). Definitely a great leg and cardio workout, and low impact which is probably a good thing for any tennis player.

Upsides: good cardio, building leg muscles, helping develop quicker feet

Downsides: being on a bike is very stable so not working any stabilizer/ balancing muscles.

I would say try it out for a week!
Thanks for that.

I’d say the best thing to do is to mix it up do you think? A bit of everything ?
 

chic

Rookie
Thanks for that.

I’d say the best thing to do is to mix it up do you think? A bit of everything ?
No reason not to do it most days of it's not hurting you imo, but listen to your body. I'm a "spry" 25yo male and overwork has given me some nagging plantar fasciitis, risks only get higher as you get older.

Just depends what you feel you need to get out of it?

If the main goal is fitness why not add spin in everyday if you've got time; mixing up different workouts will just lessen the gains.

If you start to feel your abs/ lower back/ hips aren't up to tennis, might be time to look into yoga or HIIT where the stabilization is more focused.
 

stethemint

New User
No reason not to do it most days of it's not hurting you imo, but listen to your body. I'm a "spry" 25yo male and overwork has given me some nagging plantar fasciitis, risks only get higher as you get older.

Just depends what you feel you need to get out of it?

If the main goal is fitness why not add spin in everyday if you've got time; mixing up different workouts will just lessen the gains.

If you start to feel your abs/ lower back/ hips aren't up to tennis, might be time to look into yoga or HIIT where the stabilization is more focused.
I lift weights most days 5x a week usually if I did spin after those weight sessions I think I could be sorted for strength and conditioning ? Maybe some on court speed stuff couldn’t hurt either
 

chic

Rookie
If we wanna talk what's absolutely the best for a tennis player:

Probably some focused leg, lower back, ab and shoulder driven weights routine, with a healthy dose of HIIT style workout, lots of court Sprint drills, and some yoga to top it off. Then lots of tennis on top.

But no non-pro has the time in the day to do all of that. So what's best is what you can find the time to consistently fit in. Classes are good because the community helps motivate you to go on days where you don't have the drive.
 

chic

Rookie
I lift weights most days 5x a week usually if I did spin after those weight sessions I think I could be sorted for strength and conditioning ? Maybe some on court speed stuff couldn’t hurt either
Yeah of you're already doing weights and add in spin I think thatd be a great all around workout.

Might also consider throwing a theraband in your gym bag and mixing in some rotator cuff workouts to your routine
 

stethemint

New User
If we wanna talk what's absolutely the best for a tennis player:

Probably some focused leg, lower back, ab and shoulder driven weights routine, with a healthy dose of HIIT style workout, lots of court Sprint drills, and some yoga to top it off. Then lots of tennis on top.

But no non-pro has the time in the day to do all of that. So what's best is what you can find the time to consistently fit in. Classes are good because the community helps motivate you to go on days where you don't have the drive.
You’d be surprised how much you can fit in per day even as a non pro so I’m gonna do as much as I can. My weights program usually hits every muscle group so it’ll be all good for that department.

Yeah I mean on court sprints and stuff can be incorporated after a few practise sessions for 20 mins or so. Doesn’t seem like much but it adds up!

Yeah I think I’ll mix it up from going to spin and HIIT classes in my gym. I’m a little worried they’re a bit useless tho as the majority of people going to them is middle aged women :/
 

blablavla

Hall of Fame
I was just wondering how beneficial spin classes would be for tennis fitness? They run everyday in my gym for free and I'm considering doing it everyday ( I think they are 30 min sessions ). There is also HIIT classes but I've seen them and they look pretty terrible like for old women. What is everybody's recommendations for conditioning training for a top level tennis player?
there were rumors that in earlier days Nadal would spin some 60-90 minutes before match, and obviously the tour tried to copy that, but it didn't work for most of those who tried to copy.
 

stethemint

New User
there were rumors that in earlier days Nadal would spin some 60-90 minutes before match, and obviously the tour tried to copy that, but it didn't work for most of those who tried to copy.
I still have my suspicions about nadal when he was young and up and coming
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
I was just wondering how beneficial spin classes would be for tennis fitness? They run everyday in my gym for free and I'm considering doing it everyday ( I think they are 30 min sessions ). There is also HIIT classes but I've seen them and they look pretty terrible like for old women. What is everybody's recommendations for conditioning training for a top level tennis player?
I haven't tried spin classes yet, but I ride a bicycle to contribute to my tennis fitness - I'm 53, I teach at a small club in the summers and also coach high school teams in the spring and fall. If I ride my bike two or three times a week, my overall endurance is significantly better and I also have zero grumpy-ness in my legs, especially my knees.

All sorts of things are good for helping with our on-court performance, but riding the bike has been my fountain of youth. I think that a big upside of pedaling is that it doesn't add any extra pounding to the legs. Highly recommend trying the spin workout.
 
There is also HIIT classes but I've seen them and they look pretty terrible like for old women.
If so, it's because the level of fitness of the participants is not that high, not that HIIT itself is flawed.

And you can always make any exercise more difficult by doing more reps, allowing less time for recovery, adding weight or resistance, etc.

Take the simple burpee for example: instead of a little hop at the beginning, you could do a plyometric jump onto and off of a box and then do a one-armed pushup with both feet on an exercise ball for instability rather than on the floor.

Follow along with some of the HIIT videos on YouTube and see what you think.

 

stethemint

New User
If so, it's because the level of fitness of the participants is not that high, not that HIIT itself is flawed.

And you can always make any exercise more difficult by doing more reps, allowing less time for recovery, adding weight or resistance, etc.

Take the simple burpee for example: instead of a little hop at the beginning, you could do a plyometric jump onto and off of a box and then do a one-armed pushup with both feet on an exercise ball for instability rather than on the floor.

Follow along with some of the HIIT videos on YouTube and see what you think.

Thansks for that! Is it possible to do HIIT classes off youtube or would you need equipment and stuff to make it better like in my gym for example?
 
Thansks for that! Is it possible to do HIIT classes off youtube or would you need equipment and stuff to make it better like in my gym for example?
A yoga mat would help if you're doing HIIT on a hard surface. Sometimes I do it indoors on carpet and then I don't even need a mat.

I follow YT videos; I'm too lazy to go to a gym. :D
 

chic

Rookie
Depends on the HIIT but most are bodyweight or utilize a single set of dumbbells. The harder part of doing them outside of a class is keeping yourself honest on rest intervals :p

The one big thing in favor of spin over most of these alternates is that it will really work your footspeed more than anything except maybe an agility ladder. I can say after going into the class, the target demographic may be middle aged women, but it can definitely scale to anyone and I was quite warn out (granted the one I went to was a 90 minute endurance ride, but honestly 30 min would probably be more difficult not less).
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I went to look into the Spin Class Room at my club and it was locked and I was disappointed as I wanted to try out the equipment. It appears that they are only used for the classes. Then I want to hit tennis balls.

I've been looking at VO2Max and how to increase it and I found that cyclists have the highest VO2Max numbers. Runners are a close second. I suspect that cycling is excellent for cardio as you can get a sufficient workout with minimal joint damage. The bicycles in the spin class are $2,500 models while the ones in the cardio area are quite a bit different (they aren't very good).

Rowing is a good workout too but it's hard to get into.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
How accurate is this online VO2 max calculator?


Seems like it only cares about age, waistline and resting heartrate.
I was able to get it to work and the score I got is the same as the score from my Garmin. So it could be accurate. It asks quite a few questions and I would guess that max heart rate is a big factor.
 
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onehandbh

Legend
I was able to get it to work and the score I got is the same as the score from my Garmin. So it could be accurate. It asks quite a few questions and I would guess that max heart rate is a bug factor.
I don’t know my max heart rate so I only entered age, waist and resting heartrate.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I don’t know my max heart rate so I only entered age, waist and resting heartrate.
It's VO2Max so I would think that max heartrate would be pretty important. My watch tracks heartrate, and, when I run on the treadmill, my phone sits on the treadmill console so that I can see my heartrate as I'm running. If I'm running on an indoor track, I do check my heartrate from time to time. When running outside, my watch doesn't display heartrate by default but I look at the range after the run. I can go back and look at resting and high heartrate for the past 15 months (when I got the watch). These wearables are amazing.

My fitness dropped sharply from 2017. My VO2Max 15 months ago was 30 and it's 41 today. But my fitness level right now is quite a bit lower than it was in 2017 in terms of my running performance and this translates directly to tennis. So I'm looking at various approaches to get that fitness back and will be doing more intervals in the future. Steady-state cardio is more comfortable and enjoyable (with music and podcasts) but the science indicates that intervals are more efficient. I'm looking at spinning as well - if I can get access to good equipment. I'm looking at rowing too but I don't think that I can get the workouts that I can with running or spinning.
 
I don’t know my max heart rate so I only entered age, waist and resting heartrate.
Sprint up a hill and then measure it with a timer. I suggest using a shorter time frame for the measurement, say, 20 seconds vs the standard 60 because, if you are in excellent shape, your heart rate will come down rapidly and the longer you measure it, the further away from your max heart rate you'll get. But you want to use a long enough time period to catch beats around the edges of your time frame.

Another interesting stat is how long it takes for your heart rate to return to resting. I'm not sure if this can be correlated with VO2max or even VO2median.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Sprint up a hill and then measure it with a timer. I suggest using a shorter time frame for the measurement, say, 20 seconds vs the standard 60 because, if you are in excellent shape, your heart rate will come down rapidly and the longer you measure it, the further away from your max heart rate you'll get. But you want to use a long enough time period to catch beats around the edges of your time frame.

Another interesting stat is how long it takes for your heart rate to return to resting. I'm not sure if this can be correlated with VO2max or even VO2median.
This stuff is far easier with an electronic device. Measuring your pulse after you've just worked out hard is a pain and typically inaccurate.
 

onehandbh

Legend
It's VO2Max so I would think that max heartrate would be pretty important. My watch tracks heartrate, and, when I run on the treadmill, my phone sits on the treadmill console so that I can see my heartrate as I'm running. If I'm running on an indoor track, I do check my heartrate from time to time. When running outside, my watch doesn't display heartrate by default but I look at the range after the run. I can go back and look at resting and high heartrate for the past 15 months (when I got the watch). These wearables are amazing.
That website autofills in some number for people like me that have no idea what our max heartrate is.
I mostly play doubles, which is not very tiring to me, but I do a weight training workout that gets my heartrate up a little bit.
 

maleyoyo

Professional
My Garmin device tells me I burn at least 800 calories after one hour of spinning in class.
That's the only indicator you need to know.
 

atatu

Hall of Fame
I did pilates this morning, as usual I was the only guy there, but I do feel it helps my tennis a lot.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Any inexpensive electronic timers you can recommend?
I was thinking more of fitness trackers which track your heartrate all the time.

Let's say that you run up that hill to exhaustion. You're more likely to want to put your hands on something and bend over panting instead of taking out your phone, starting a timer, and then trying to find your pulse.
 

blablavla

Hall of Fame
It's VO2Max so I would think that max heartrate would be pretty important. My watch tracks heartrate, and, when I run on the treadmill, my phone sits on the treadmill console so that I can see my heartrate as I'm running. If I'm running on an indoor track, I do check my heartrate from time to time. When running outside, my watch doesn't display heartrate by default but I look at the range after the run. I can go back and look at resting and high heartrate for the past 15 months (when I got the watch). These wearables are amazing.

My fitness dropped sharply from 2017. My VO2Max 15 months ago was 30 and it's 41 today. But my fitness level right now is quite a bit lower than it was in 2017 in terms of my running performance and this translates directly to tennis. So I'm looking at various approaches to get that fitness back and will be doing more intervals in the future. Steady-state cardio is more comfortable and enjoyable (with music and podcasts) but the science indicates that intervals are more efficient. I'm looking at spinning as well - if I can get access to good equipment. I'm looking at rowing too but I don't think that I can get the workouts that I can with running or spinning.
My Polar device doesn't need maxHR for VO2Max estimation.
There is a test called, Fitness test.
It essentially asks you to lay down in during approx. 4 minutes and then gives you VO2Max.

So resting HR could work as well.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
My Polar device doesn't need maxHR for VO2Max estimation.
There is a test called, Fitness test.
It essentially asks you to lay down in during approx. 4 minutes and then gives you VO2Max.

So resting HR could work as well.
How do you know that it doesn’t have MaxHR?
 

sovertennis

Professional
I've had mixed success using heart rate as an indicator. On a bike or erg, I've found watts is significantly more useful.
 

Dan Huben

Semi-Pro
I taught spinning for 15 yrs and always had a following of people who were different than other instructors. It’s very customizable inside the franchise. Some classes visited catered to the old lady social hour and other to the hammers.

Your legs will never be stronger for dynamic movements even those outside the spin spectrum with a good instructor


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I tried to sign up for a Spinning class. Earliest opening was two weeks later so I signed up for it. The classes before then are oversubscribed. I didn't realize how popular it is.

I used to ride with the Charles River Wheelman in my teens and twenties and I used to build and maintain bicycles. But where I live isn't conducive to bicycle riding.
 

onehandbh

Legend
My friend has decided to enter the next Tour de France.

He has never ridden a bicycle in his life but just started taking spinning classes 5 days a week.
 

TnsGuru

Professional
Very beneficial but only if you "clip in" to the pedals with actual cycle shoes. When you clip onto the pedals you have to use a circular motion and use your hamstrings on the upstroke of the pedal as well as pushing down using the quads on the downstroke. This enables a balanced leg workout.

If you feel fatigued on the front quads only your doing it incorrectly and will have muscle strength imbalances.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
I find I move better and have increased stamina when I am also riding my mountain bike twice a week. So spin class would be very good for your overall fitness.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I've started using the bicycles at one of my gyms. It's a decent workout though I haven't been able to get my heartrate up to levels when I'm running. I think that I need more muscular conditioning for cycling.
 
I've started using the bicycles at one of my gyms. It's a decent workout though I haven't been able to get my heartrate up to levels when I'm running. I think that I need more muscular conditioning for cycling.
Crank the incline level up to "ludicrous" and your heart rate will follow.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Crank the incline level up to "ludicrous" and your heart rate will follow.
I'm not aware of bicycles having an incline level. They have resistance levels though. The problem with raising resistance levels is muscular failure - which would be counterproductive. I would have thought that high cadence rates would have done the job but that's not the case.
 
I'm not aware of bicycles having an incline level. They have resistance levels though. The problem with raising resistance levels is muscular failure - which would be counterproductive. I would have thought that high cadence rates would have done the job but that's not the case.
Riding flat in a higher gear is not nearly as hard as riding uphill; say, on a 15% grade.
 
I did not see a way to do this on any of the machines that I looked at.

We're talking about spinning; not riding on a real bicycle.
I've never "spun". But I thought at least some of the models had incline settings. Maybe I'm thinking of the fancy treadmills.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I've never "spun". But I thought at least some of the models had incline settings. Maybe I'm thinking of the fancy treadmills.
Treadmills have inclines.

An incline in a stationary bicycle would make no sense in terms of physics given that resistance is a flywheel. Being at any angle wouldn't change the amount of resistance.

The idea of the thread is to determine whether spinning would be useful for tennis. So ideally you'd answer with whatever experience you have with spinning.
 
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