Squash - inherently conflicting?

FatHead250

Semi-Pro
Watched a bit of squash recently. Very weird how you need to both beat your opponent by hitting good shots, and also make room for him to get to those shots. I just don't understand that sport.

Any genuine attempt to make room for your opponent will result in a worse preparation for the next shot. Before you hit a shot, you need to consider whether you will be in the way of opponent.

i dont know if conflicting is a good word. Rather, i think that squash's rules are already a failure.
 

Slowtwitcher

Hall of Fame
Watched a bit of squash recently. Very weird how you need to both beat your opponent by hitting good shots, and also make room for him to get to those shots. I just don't understand that sport.

Any genuine attempt to make room for your opponent will result in a worse preparation for the next shot. Before you hit a shot, you need to consider whether you will be in the way of opponent.
Are people still playing Squash? I thought the sport was dead... if not, covid-19 will take care of it.
 

van_Loederen

Professional
played it occasionally in the past. was convinced it's mostly meant to be a more entertaining semi-competitive form of cardio workout.
rather than applying wicked tactics you would try to get your partner tired.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
@FedFosterWallace @Slowtwitcher @van_Loederen

Andre Agassi: "Squash is absolutely one of the best/toughest sports."

...
i dont know if conflicting is a good word. Rather, i think that squash's rules are already a failure.
Nah, my take is that this assessment is a bit of a fail. I've only had the opportunity to play squash a couple of times but I played a lot of racquetball in the 80s & early 90s. Similar hindrance rules. Not really all that much of an issue. In general, squash is a more demanding game than racquetball.

Some very notable tennis players are also squash players / enthusiasts. This includes: Roger Federer, Andy Murray, Andre Agassi, Kim Clijsters, Stefan Edberg and Bjorn Borg. Most, if not all, of these players were promoting a push to have squash included in the 2020 Olympics. We might have to wait another 4 years for that to happen, however.

I've heard that Murray and Federer both played quite a bit of squash in their youth. Possibly the others mentioned above did as well. I've read that Edberg was playing a fair amount of squash (and rackelton) after he retired from tennis. I recall an (NBC) televised competition around 1980 where Borg was competing in squash. He also competed in badminton & table tennis.

From TennisWorld USA (no spaces):
 
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SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Squash hindrances & lets, when they happen, are usually obvious and straightforward. Once in awhile, it requires a ruling. Tennis also includes let's and hindrances.

 

Crocodile

Legend
Squash was pretty popular in Australia up to the 1990’s. They tried to improve visibility of the sport by having glass see through back walls.
Originally the key strategy was to win the right to serve and then what you would do is to try and control the centre of the court and have your opponent end up in either back corner. They did change the service rules from memory. It was a very difficult sport to televise and many squash courts were modified for other uses.
 

r2473

Talk Tennis Guru
Squash hindrances & lets, when they happen, are usually obvious and straightforward. Once in awhile, it requires a ruling. Tennis also includes let's and hindrances.
I played on the University club team for racquetball. It's fun to play with guys that know how to move and what to do on court. When I tried playing after college, I mostly ran into guys that had no clue how to move on the court. I was always scared I was going to hit them or they were going to hit me.

For example, when your opponent is standing directly in front of you, when playing in the club, I knew my opponent was going to jump. So I had not trouble playing a shot at them about knee / ankle level. But when playing bad players, you have to hold up and play a (avoidable) hinder. Which makes the game pretty stupid.

Doubles is a nightmare without 4 good players

 

HitMoreBHs

Rookie
One of things I like more about tennis is that the other disgustingly sweaty dude is over 80feet away from me.
“If you cannot hear your opponent breathe and smell his sweat, you are not getting close enough.”
- The legendary Jahanghir Khan on court positioning during a rally -
 
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