Stare hard at ball until you pull the trigger ... then chill

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by ByeByePoly, May 12, 2018.

  1. ByeByePoly

    ByeByePoly Legend

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    :D This was an inside out winner against Nadal

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. tennisjunky

    tennisjunky New User

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    HA HA..... this could have been a winner against anyone!
     
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  3. dominikk1985

    dominikk1985 Legend

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    Studies have shown that baseball players lose vision of the ball the last 10 feet or so, they basically extrapolate the final ball flight part in their brain.

    Still it is bad advice to yank the head away because the head weighs a couple pounds and can pull on the spine and subsequently the shoulders and arm leading to less precise contact.so the old keeping the head still still has its merits even if you can't actually watch the ball hit the strings.
     
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  4. ByeByePoly

    ByeByePoly Legend

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    Cirque du Soleil means "Circus of the sun". I have no idea why a play on words with that is "bad" ... but have removed it from my signature and future comment.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2018
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  5. ByeByePoly

    ByeByePoly Legend

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    "The barycenter (or barycentre; from the Ancient Greek βαρύς heavy + κέντρον centre) is the center of mass of two or more bodies that are orbiting each other, which is the point around which they both orbit. It is an important concept in fields such as astronomy and astrophysics."
     
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  6. AdrianC

    AdrianC New User

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    I noticed that in the replay they showed of that winner, certainly not what we're taught. I remember thinking at the time, he could literally hit that winner blindfolded, although you can have eyelids appear closed and still see.
     
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  7. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    Vic Braden did research on tennis vision back in the 1970s. I believe the research indicated that you cannot actually see the contact of the racket and the ball no matter how you try. I think Vic advocated concentrating on the ball coming into the contact zone and keeping the head still until after contact.
     
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  8. dman72

    dman72 Hall of Fame

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    As other have mentioned, keeping the eyes down is more about not having all your mechanics pull up along with your head, less so than the benefits of actually seeing the ball
     
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  9. Dartagnan64

    Dartagnan64 Hall of Fame

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    Yes that is what I've been taught as well. It's never about keeping your eye on the ball but about keeping a still head. Any head movement affects the arm swing path leading to misses.
     
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  10. Curiosity

    Curiosity Professional

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    There is a trick, or "technique," involved in contemporary topspin forehands (and one-handed backhands). I will (laugh) avoid writing a Robert Ludlum novel length answer, and I'll only comment on the forehand. Nadal, Federer, Thiem, and many other contemporary pros settle their contact point by sighting the ball with their off hand as it first rises from the bounce, just before swingiing the off arm leftward (for a righty). Then, as they complete ESR (or the "flip") and pull the racquet out butt-cap-first, they aim the butt cap at that point where they expect to contact the ball. From then on things happen so fast that the contact point is settled. The racquet head immediately accelerates so fast that adjustments are, at best, extremely difficult. It is at this point, just after the racquet starts to swing post-butt-cap-aiming, that Fed and Rafa turn their heads to the side. (I won't go into the advantages of that head turn.) Their focus on the ball is surrendered with that turn, though peripherally or weakly they surely can see the ball if they don't pull a Thiem.

    Given the incredibly brief interval to contact at that point, though, it doesn't really matter. It is worth noting that they are extremely skilled at estimating the ball's flight path once it has bounced. They've hit millions of rising balls from various players. (And, they do occasionally frame the ball!) Also, if the ball is rising in a line roughly parallel to their rotated-back (at the start) upper body, the butt-cap pull-out to the "expected point of contact" is approximately the same as "pointing at the ball." There's more to the head swivel and slight head tilt that that, but that's another topic. This topic has been written about by a few recognized experts. I'm not going to site them because it's too tedious. At length, once the final swing/pivot into contact has begun, you can close your eyes or turn your head (reducing central vision on the ball) and yet still hit it, and well. Laugh. Best.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2018
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