Straightening strings

shadow01

Semi-Pro
I used to use a babolat setting off awl. But I changed technique to straighten as I string and then light finger straightening once it's off the machine if needed. I noticed that the technique change yields a stiffer string bed - but I keep it consistent.
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
I know there are tools out there and will eventually get one but I use my fingers. I do my best to straighten the crosses as I tension to minimize the work.

Someday I will buy a tool.
 

MattCrosby

Professional
I straighten as a I pull crosses, then if I need to go back through with a Babolat Awl, then I'll make sure they're super straight by using my fingers after I have unmounted the frame.
 

First Serve

Rookie
I use the Kimony setting awl to straighten cross strings. Less wear and tear than using my digits. Picked it up the same time I splurged on their starting clamp.

 
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jim e

Legend
When I tension cross strings, I try to push the string next to the adjacent previous tensioned cross before tensioning that cross string, then when pull tension, the string moves down relatively straight, and just keep straight with fingers.
This works for me.
 

shadow01

Semi-Pro
When I tension cross strings, I try to push the string next to the adjacent previous tensioned cross before tensioning that cross string, then when pull tension, the string moves down relatively straight, and just keep straight with fingers.
This works for me.
Yeah this is what I do as well. Helps me avoid misweaves as well!
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Like @jim e I make an effort to keep crosses straight as I string. With the Mighty Sensor, it's pretty easy to do so. Basically when I pull a frame off it's usually the outside mains which need a little help and I do that with my fingers.
 

Wes

Professional
Picked it up the same time I splurged on their starting clamp.
:eek::eek::eek:

Ri-donk-ulous.
I just can't fathom it being worth 5X the price of virtually any other starting clamp.

At the very least, IF one was going to buy that thing, why not order it from Yonex and save some cash?
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
I straighten as install the crosses and then usually touch it up with my setting off awl as needed before I pull the frame off the machine. Fingers would work just as well at the end but just habit for me.
 

First Serve

Rookie
:eek::eek::eek:

Ri-donk-ulous.
I just can't fathom it being worth 5X the price of virtually any other starting clamp.

At the very least, IF one was going to buy that thing, why not order it from Yonex and save some cash?
Kimony bought out this part of Yonex. One cannot purchase the starting clamp new from Yonex anymore. But I appreciate well made tools and this Kimony starting clamp is well made with a nice smooth cam action mechanism to lock the clamp. It is also easy to disassembly something that my Gamma Spring action clamps are not made to do.

I agree it was alot of money, but when I Ibought it a year ago right before COVID it was $150 and not $250 that is listed now. I am not sure why the price went up by $100 or $75 if I paid $175.. Since I started stringing I wanted to get the Babolat one but couldnt directly from the OEM except from the UK and with all those hassles, I thought what the heck buy a nice clamp from Kimony who sells it from NY (no customs hassle from the UK - racquet depot?). I also tried calling Babolat in CO to try and get their stringing tool set, but didnt get any confidence from the guy on the phone. He told me let me see what I can get.

You can blame Drauklie when I used to read those Babolat tool threads buried in these archives. :p
 
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shadow01

Semi-Pro
Anyone ever try that "String Thing"?
Looked at it and passed. If my strings are moving that much and not going back easily with a couple of finger pushes -it’s time for me to restring. Or I have a locked string bed which I don’t like and won’t use that string setup again.
 

zipplock

Hall of Fame
Looked at it and passed. If my strings are moving that much and not going back easily with a couple of finger pushes -it’s time for me to restring. Or I have a locked string bed which I don’t like and won’t use that string setup again.
I meant for straightening them once as soon as you pull the racquet off the machine.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
Anyone ever try that "String Thing"?
I bought the pair when they first came out. They now sit in my stringing box unused. My hope was that they'd take care of the micro adjustments required after stringing... they don't. The only use I can see for them is if you play with a string that moves a lot like a syn gut and want to quickly get them more or less straight again on court, maybe at a change of ends. The only stringer who might benefit is someone who doesn't even try to straighten the crosses as they go.
 
I just straighten as I string crosses using my fingers. Easy enough to pull/push the crosses straight. Especially poly which is meant to slide easily anyway. Never seen the use for a tool and cant imagine a tool being any quicker than using fingers and most likely a lot slower.
 

struggle

Legend
Straighten as you tension/string as previously mentioned, then a final very minor straightening as needed once off the machine/done stringing.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I’ve said it before and I will say it again STRAIGHTENING THE STRINGS HAS VERY LIITTLE CHANGE IN TENSION! I’ve been using my X-Stringer to string several rackets lately just for the fun of it. I’ve noticed when I move my flying clamps the DW arm usually drops just a little. It does not matter if I am stringing mains or crosses, the arm falls a little when I move the clamps.

I've watched some of @Richard Parnell’s videos an I noticed he often tugs on the tensioned strings before he moves his clamps. Why? I think the tug breaks the friction bond between the mains and the frame or the mains, crosses, and the frame. it would be nice to know Richard for sure. If I give a gentle tug on each string I tension on the DW, the arm does not fall when I move the clamp because it has already equalized tension on the string I’m tensioning. I can’t see this happen on my eCP as much.

So let’s say I’m stringing a racket and I tension a cross. If the cross is as straight as I think it can be should I still move it? I think so. Adding that very slight stretch to every string as I string the racket add more tension in the final stringbed. It allows you to break the string friction bond.

The bow in the crosses will amplify itself as you go down the racket. So it’s a goI’d idea to keep your crosses as straight as you can as you work down the racket. I straighten the cross I tension after I get the previously tensioned cross as straight as can be. There are times when you can’t really straighten the cross you‘re tensioning as the down pressure from the previously tension cross pushes it down. If you allow that bow to amplify itself it just starts to bow more.

After dismounting the racket I will go back and check and straighten all the mains and crosses with my fingers. The string thing will not straighten a slightly bent string. You can eyeball all the mains and crosses to see which need adjusting. After that you can look diagonally acrosses the string bed to look for a smooth curve of string intersection and if there are any misweaves.
 

jeroenn

New User
I bought the pair when they first came out. They now sit in my stringing box unused.
Same here. Used it a few times. Decided it was a waste of money. I straighten as much as I can when pulling tension. Afterwards I adjust when the racket is done and off the machine. Seems to be enough. For some reason never really looked into the straightening awl thing.
 

eah123

Rookie
I don’t bother straightening crosses after completing the string job. I do straighten each cross right after I tension it.
 

tennytive

Professional
I bought the open pattern string thing. I use it when I play, not for stringing. Works great for me, I'm glad to have it.
On strightening strings while stringing I use jim e's technique, but they never do get quite straight so I may end up using the end of a sharpie to nudge some strings. Never got the hang of the blunt awl, I'm impressed when I see someone using that tool especially so quickly between strings.
 

Znak

Professional
I bought the open pattern string thing. I use it when I play, not for stringing. Works great for me, I'm glad to have it.
On strightening strings while stringing I use jim e's technique, but they never do get quite straight so I may end up using the end of a sharpie to nudge some strings. Never got the hang of the blunt awl, I'm impressed when I see someone using that tool especially so quickly between strings.
Yeah I always see that, is there a science behind that? Anyone can tell me what is happening in slow mo exactly when you use the awl like that?
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Speaking of Kimony, I bought a pair of their string nippers. It has a neat little addition. When you clip the end of a string, the clipped portion doesn't go flying onto the floor or into the carpet. The snips hold it until you open them up and it drops in the garbage. They are also really sharp. My previous pair were probably 25 years old and had become duller than I realized.

The bow in the crosses will amplify itself as you go down the racket.
I don't find this to be true if attention is paid to keeping crosses straight as you string. I pull the cross to be tension up then pull tension. I then make sure it's straight and keep my fingers on it. I clamp it and release tension all the while holding the string steady with one hand. I don't have a "bow" or "smile" or anything other than straight going down the string bed. I believe keeping crosses straight results in a higher dynamic tension and so do most guys stringing on the tour, that's why they do it. I don't believe observing a drop weight arm is really telling you anything.
 

jeroenn

New User
Yeah I always see that, is there a science behind that? Anyone can tell me what is happening in slow mo exactly when you use the awl like that?
I think you angle it slightly towards you and then kinda slam down. Because of the rounded head, shouldn't matter if you hit the string on top, it will slide off.
 

First Serve

Rookie
Speaking of Kimony, I bought a pair of their string nippers. It has a neat little addition. ....
Agreed. I bought some of their tools and found them to be very well made. I didnt buy the nippers but I did purchase the string bed cutters and I found them better to my Gamma cutters. When I first started stringing I was interested in buying the Bablot string kit but because it was so hard to get in the US, I ended up going with Kimony for some of my nicer tools, which were NOT necessarily required but nice to have. Kimony gave me some freebies when I made my order which included some power pads.
 
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Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Agreed. I bought some of their tools and found them to be very well made. I didnt buy the nippers but I did purchase the string bed cutters and I found them better to my Gamma cutters. When I first started stringing I was interested in buying the Bablot string kit but because it was so hard to get in the US, I ended up going with Kimony for some of my nicer tools, which were necessarily required but nice to have. Kimony gave me some freebies when I made my order which included some power pads.
I too bought their string bed cutter. It is fantastic!
 

SuperJ

New User
I pull them toward the previous string so they pull straight and straighten them while on the tension head. I've measured a tension difference and it doesn't slow me down.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
Do you straighten the strings when you pull a racquet off the machine? Do you use your fingers or a tool? If a tool, which one?
I have a wooden clothes pin I use to string O-Port racquets. It's got a little slot on the flat end I can slip over strings and then move the crosses as needed. Saves my fingers...
 
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