String Length Issues

Doc Hollidae

Hall of Fame
I have a Graphene Speed Pro and an X-2 stringer. In my experience, I need ~21.5 ft for my mains if not more due to having to wrap the string around the gripper. On several occasions I've had to move the tension head closer to the frame just for the string to reach the gripper on the last main then move it back. Due to this, packs of strings are pretty much useless to me because I don't have enough left over for the crosses.

Do other X-2 or drop weight stringers have the same issue? Any solutions or tips?
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Using a starting clamp for a bridge is a big help. You could also use a set with a 10.25' short side and string your mains. After cutting of the long side use what is left over to string your crosses. If you use a starting knot on the top cross you should have plenty of string to string your crosses.

EDIT: I often string 16 main mid plus rackets using this method with 33.75' (15 (racket lengths) of string. But I also do not have an X2 stringer.

EDIT: Here is a video of that process:

 
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Booger

Hall of Fame
Weird, I've never had that issue with that frame on a star 5. How much string do you need to reach the gripper on an X-2?

You can either string one piece or use a starting clamp bridge if you really are short.

 

Doc Hollidae

Hall of Fame
Weird, I've never had that issue with that frame on a star 5. How much string do you need to reach the gripper on an X-2?

You can either string one piece or use a starting clamp bridge if you really are short.

Sounds like I need a starting clamp or learn how to string a one piece. But, I believe I would need a starting clamp for a one piece anyways.

A Star 5 is much different from a X-2 dropweight. I don't believe you have to wrap the string around the gripper like you do with an X-2.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Here's an ATW variant I've used on frames like this, which would require a starting clamp:

Measure out your short side - enough for 10 mains and 2 crosses, plus a little extra for 1 tie off
Use the remainder for your long side

On the short side, string mains 1-8, holding the 8th main with a starting clamp
On the long side, string mains 1-8, then transition to the 2nd cross
String crosses 2 through 19, and tie off the long side on the 18th cross

Now, with the short side, you're essentially going to string a box:
1. Short side 9th main
2. 20th cross
3. Long side 9th main
4. Top cross
 

uk_skippy

Hall of Fame
Here's an ATW variant I've used on frames like this, which would require a starting clamp:

Measure out your short side - enough for 10 mains and 2 crosses, plus a little extra for 1 tie off
Use the remainder for your long side

On the short side, string mains 1-8, holding the 8th main with a starting clamp
On the long side, string mains 1-8, then transition to the 2nd cross
String crosses 2 through 19, and tie off the long side on the 18th cross

Now, with the short side, you're essentially going to string a box:
1. Short side 9th main
2. 20th cross
3. Long side 9th main
4. Top cross
The downside of that pattern is that you're installing the crosses before stringing the outer mains. So the crosses will 'pull' in the frame a bit more than using a 2 piece method because of the missing outer mains. Also you'll be stringing the outer mains at the end which will mean slightly lower tension on them due to those strings being hard-weaves. Agreed that if you use a universal ATW pattern you'll have hard weaves every other cross string but overall it may be better as you're installing all the mains before stringing (most) of the crosses.

But, there is no perfect ATW pattern, and that (has been) a different discussion.

Regards

Paul
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
But, there is no perfect ATW pattern, and that (has been) a different discussion.
I know you had a thread on the perfect ATW (http://tinyurl.com/ja2jfus) and I don't want to revisit that old thread. The major benefits of using a 1 piece pattern is to reduce two knots and use less string. The only way to only have two knots is to use 1 string unless you eliminate knots all together. But you can get get the benefit of using less string with the pattern I suggested above in post #2. It uses only a few inches more string that a 1 piece.

EDIT: I just strung two Tecnifibre frames one 315 Dynacore and one 315 DC (both 16x19 98si frames made on the same mold) w/Tecnibre Multi Fell 17 @60# w/10% prestretch, and they required 33' of string with a 9' short side. No bridging or starting clamps required. This may be a good option for the OP (@Doc Hollidae) if he is coming up short using sets of string. Two piece stringing always works.
 
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am1899

Hall of Fame
The downside of that pattern is that you're installing the crosses before stringing the outer mains. So the crosses will 'pull' in the frame a bit more than using a 2 piece method because of the missing outer mains. Also you'll be stringing the outer mains at the end which will mean slightly lower tension on them due to those strings being hard-weaves. Agreed that if you use a universal ATW pattern you'll have hard weaves every other cross string but overall it may be better as you're installing all the mains before stringing (most) of the crosses.

But, there is no perfect ATW pattern, and that (has been) a different discussion.

Regards

Paul
Paul - first, I totally agree with your points, as to the consequences of using the pattern I suggested. As you indicated...I also agree - there doesn't seem to be a perfect ATW.

But with respect to the universal ATW with this frame...can you please school me here? I'm not being porky. I'm confused how universal ATW can work with this frame, without some kind of modification...

To my knowledge, universal ATW calls for:

- Stringing all but the outside main on the short side
- Running in the top cross with the short side (in this case after the 8th main)
- Stringing all mains on the long side + bottom cross + short side outside main + remaining crosses

With the shared hole setup on this frame, I can't see how the above would work. Seems to me the shared holes would prevent transitioning to the top cross from the short side 8th main, and transitioning to the 2nd cross from the outside short side main....?

The variation that seems to make sense to me at the moment, would be:
- With the short side, string 8 mains, then string the 2nd cross, followed by the top cross, tie off
- With the long side, string 9 mains, the bottom cross, the short side 9th main, followed by crosses 3-19.
 
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uk_skippy

Hall of Fame
Paul - first, I totally agree with your points, as to the consequences of using the pattern I suggested. As you indicated...I also agree - there doesn't seem to be a perfect ATW.

But with respect to the universal ATW with this frame...can you please school me here? I'm not being porky. I'm confused how universal ATW can work with this frame, without some kind of modification...

To my knowledge, universal ATW calls for:

- Stringing all but the outside main on the short side
- Running in the top cross with the short side (in this case after the 8th main)
- Stringing all mains on the long side + bottom cross + short side outside main + remaining crosses

With the shared hole setup on this frame, I can't see how the above would work. Seems to me the shared holes would prevent transitioning to the top cross from the short side 8th main, and transitioning to the 2nd cross from the outside short side main....?

The variation that seems to make sense to me at the moment, would be:
- With the short side, string 8 mains, then string the 2nd cross, followed by the top cross, tie off
- With the long side, string 9 mains, the bottom cross, the short side 9th main, followed by crosses 3-19.
You have answered your own question with you last paragraph as it is exactly how I would do it, but with a slight amendment. Once you'd strung the 2nd from top cross, you'd hold it with a starting clamp. String the rest like you've said. Then once you've finished at the bottom, you can go back to the top and be in a position to used both fixed clamps, and then string/tension/tie-off the top cross.

This pattern also works with Head frames with 16x19 and with shared holes inc Instinct

Regards

Paul
 

Doc Hollidae

Hall of Fame
You could also just buy a reel.
I wanna try a pack or two before committing to a reel. Normally, I just buy a reel of Big Hitter Blue and call it a day, but I had the opportunity to try Hyper G in my Project One 7 and want to know how it'll play in the GSP. I can buy two sets, but will end up having to toss the left over until I can get a starting clamp.
 

Big_Dangerous

Talk Tennis Guru
I have a Graphene Speed Pro and an X-2 stringer. In my experience, I need ~21.5 ft for my mains if not more due to having to wrap the string around the gripper. On several occasions I've had to move the tension head closer to the frame just for the string to reach the gripper on the last main then move it back. Due to this, packs of strings are pretty much useless to me because I don't have enough left over for the crosses.

Do other X-2 or drop weight stringers have the same issue? Any solutions or tips?
Just do the job as a two piece. I've honestly never had that problem when I've cut a set (40 ft) in half. 20 feet has been more than enough string for me. I could probably use 18 or 19 for the mains and still be okay, and the same with the crosses.
 

Doc Hollidae

Hall of Fame
Just do the job as a two piece. I've honestly never had that problem when I've cut a set (40 ft) in half. 20 feet has been more than enough string for me. I could probably use 18 or 19 for the mains and still be okay, and the same with the crosses.
20 ft is definitely way too short in my situation.
 

esgee48

Legend
Why don't you just prestring all the mains with out tension or cutting the pack of 40'. Adjust excess string on the short side so it will have enough to reach the gripper. Now put the frame on the machine and start tensioning. When all the mains are tensioned, you should have enough on the short side for a knot etc. After you tie off the long side, then cut off the reminder close to the tie off knot. Use a starting knot for the 1st cross using the remaining string for the crosses.

You lose too much length because you are cutting the string prematurely so that you can have enough on both sides to tension and tie off the last mains. If you worry ONLY about 1 side, then you will have enough. FWIW, I have used NXT in the frame and will have over 5' left over from a 40' pack because the strings stretch. Poly sucks at stretching and that is your problem.
 
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Bluefan75

Professional
Just do the job as a two piece. I've honestly never had that problem when I've cut a set (40 ft) in half. 20 feet has been more than enough string for me. I could probably use 18 or 19 for the mains and still be okay, and the same with the crosses.
Yeah if it's an 18 by 20, 20' is nowhere near enough. you have 5 inch stubs on the ends to try to pull tension on the last main and tie your knot.
 

Big_Dangerous

Talk Tennis Guru
Yeah if it's an 18 by 20, 20' is nowhere near enough. you have 5 inch stubs on the ends to try to pull tension on the last main and tie your knot.
I've strung 18x20 racquets 2 piece, and I didn't do anything different as far as cutting the string length is concerned.
 

OrangePower

Legend
I have a Graphene Speed Pro and an X-2 stringer. In my experience, I need ~21.5 ft for my mains if not more due to having to wrap the string around the gripper. On several occasions I've had to move the tension head closer to the frame just for the string to reach the gripper on the last main then move it back. Due to this, packs of strings are pretty much useless to me because I don't have enough left over for the crosses.

Do other X-2 or drop weight stringers have the same issue? Any solutions or tips?
I've had similar issues. I have an X-2 and use Radicals (20x18). With 2-piece I need 21' 8'' for poly mains. Actually in my case the remaining 18' 4'' is enough for the crosses, but since I hybrid, I'm looking to get two mains jobs of 20' each out of a pack. Here's how it works for me:

With 20' I end up with about 3-4 inches coming out of the last grommet on either side. This is enough to tie off but not enough to reach the gripper to tension. So I take a random piece of string (typically a long piece from the old string I just cut out), and tie it as an extension to the small piece coming out of the grommet. I experimented with several knots to do this before finding one that holds under tension without slipping, so you might have to do same. Then tension, cut off the extension and knot, and tie off.

It's a bit of a pain but I don't string from packs often (just when I'm trying a new string).

(Reading other responses, note that this is pretty much the same as using a starting clamp to bridge, but without the starting clamp - just using a knot to connect the string and extension instead.)
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
^^ I don't doubt that the method works. But man, I wouldn't wanna be anywhere near the tensioner if one of those knots used to create the bridge gave way. Why not invest in a starting clamp to create a sturdier bridge?
 

OrangePower

Legend
^^ I don't doubt that the method works. But man, I wouldn't wanna be anywhere near the tensioner if one of those knots used to create the bridge gave way. Why not invest in a starting clamp to create a sturdier bridge?
Just because I'm cheap and lazy :)

I've never needed a starting clamp before since I do crosses with a starting knot. So when I found myself in this situation I had to improvise on the spot. It's not something I need to do often, and now that I know it works, eh.
 

esgee48

Legend
^ +1. I actually keep scrap poly about 3' long with a non slip knot and loop on it. I can tie a slip knot and loop on the short string and connect the two strings (google slip knot boy scouts image). The strings will not loosen nor will the knots. Just tug on the end of the slip knot and the strings detach.
 

WhETHANs

Rookie
I also use an x2 and I have this problem occasionally too and before it was heartbreaking to waste half a set of strings!!! But I tried something similar to using a starting clamp to bridge 2 strings. I used a flying clamp to bridge a scrap string with the string and it worked well!!! So relieved. I have stringway clamps. I tried it with those plastic gamma ones that come with the machine but they don't hold well enough when bridging.
 
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