String weavers

Any thoughts? I'm terrible at weaving. I can kind of weave like the first 2 crosses. Then my hands get too sweaty and I have to weave from not the tip of the string but further down while making some sort of loop. I'm not sure if you guys know what I'm talking about.

Watch the video from tennis spin:
 

loosegroove

Hall of Fame
Never used one, but I could see them being useful for those who string infrequently and haven't gotten very proficient at weaving. But for those who are proficient, they'd probably be more of a nuisance than a time saving tool. And I've actually seen some people who have become quite fast with the loop method you mention. But if interested, you should check out the Stringway and Mistringer versions. They're more expensive, but I like how you actually push the string straight though the accessory rather than still having to pseudo-weave.
 
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MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
I saw Harry's video earlier today--I came away convinced that it would actually take me more time to use that thing--he basically still had to weave. I guess a newbie may get a benefit but as struggle says: Just learn to weave. I have not used the Stringway or MiStinger tools so maybe they work. I got couple samples of the String Zing and was impressed by its innovation but they are not reusable. Been weaving the old fashioned way for almost 50 years--still works fine.
 
Never used one, but I could see them being useful for those who string infrequently and haven't gotten very proficient at weaving. But for those who are proficient, they'd be more of a nuisance than a time saving tool. And I've actually seen some people who have become quite fast with the loop method you mention. But if interested, you should check out the Stringway and Mistringer versions. They're more expensive, but I like how you actually push the string straight though the accessory rather than still having to pseudo-weave.
Yes, you're right. Mistringer looks more useful. I don't string professionally and it doesn't look I'm getting any better at weaving. I just do the loop thing cuz my fingers just slip cuz of my sweaty hands. It's ok when I'm crossing a synthetic gut but when have to do poly, my fingers just don't like it much at the end.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
If you're struggling with push weaving, have you tried pull weaving? (or vice versa)

You may take to one action far better than the other.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I bought one. Was looking at the Stringway years ago when guts and glory tennis reviewed it and this one is half the price though not as good, it seems faster.

I have been learning to weave for years now and its no better. Probably the extreme tensions and stiff crosses.

Its better than 5 years ago but not by much:

 
The one from the video kinda sucks. I have the Stringway cross striniging tool which is pretty good. It has a channel that guides the sting through the opening. I used to use it every time but it doesn’t work in my dense 18x20 UT so now I weave by hand.
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
Or a setting off awl. It’s basically a large gauge blunt awl. Like weaving, the “straightening stab” is an acquired skill.
 

norcal

Hall of Fame
String weaver is good for making weaving easier and faster for those who aren't good at/newer to weaving.

String weaver is really good at saving your fingers when doing full beds of poly and/or poly crosses (especially dense patterns, lol nightmare). I guess I'm a total puss but I hate stringing poly crosses, particularly shaped ones. String weaver makes it easy. I am good at weaving (been stringing for 30 years) but multiple string jobs of poly in a row, I'll take the help (and avoid the pain in the @SS/fingers) every time. If I am stringing my racket (poly main/syn cross) I don't use the string weaver because it's a soft cross and I weave fast.

I can't compare it to the other weaving tools because I haven't used them but depending on your needs the string weaver is a good tool to have. I don't think the 'man up and learn to weave!' mantra addresses all the issues the string weaver helps to solve.
 
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2nd Serve Ace

Hall of Fame
I have a stringway mk2 and like it a lot as a home stringer. Really pairs well with yonex frames as they have a squarish shape and dense patterns, which means I can do all but the bottom cross with it.
 

HBK4life

Professional
Doesn’t look like much help. I saw a guy on YouTube that had a homemade rig with some thing rope that he used with the tennis string and just yanked it. I could not figure out how he had it set up.
 

loosegroove

Hall of Fame
Doesn’t look like much help. I saw a guy on YouTube that had a homemade rig with some thing rope that he used with the tennis string and just yanked it. I could not figure out how he had it set up.
I think that was @Irvin. With this method you can only use it on half your crosses, since the "rope" is only correctly woven for every other cross.
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
That was me it wasn't rope it was just braided twine but it will only work in one direction. I believe the best way to learn is just practice.
 

StringGuruMRT

Semi-Pro
Any thoughts? I'm terrible at weaving. I can kind of weave like the first 2 crosses. Then my hands get too sweaty and I have to weave from not the tip of the string but further down while making some sort of loop. I'm not sure if you guys know what I'm talking about.

Watch the video from tennis spin:
OP have you ever tried "pulling a loop" while weaving? That might be a good alternative since you are lacking grip. Instead of pushing with the fingertips, you weave the string towards you. This is how I was taught to weave, and I am every bit as fast as people who push weave.
 
OP have you ever tried "pulling a loop" while weaving? That might be a good alternative since you are lacking grip. Instead of pushing with the fingertips, you weave the string towards you. This is how I was taught to weave, and I am every bit as fast as people who push weave.
Yes, I just tried pulling the other day and it was no bueno. I have very sweaty palms and it gets worse with this weather. Loop weaving is still the way to go for me until the Mistringer W arrives.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
OP have you ever tried "pulling a loop" while weaving? That might be a good alternative since you are lacking grip. Instead of pushing with the fingertips, you weave the string towards you. This is how I was taught to weave, and I am every bit as fast as people who push weave.
Man, I have tried pulling a loop so many times...and it just hasn’t come. Different strokes for different folks. :)
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Man, I have tried pulling a loop so many times...and it just hasn’t come. Different strokes for different folks. :)
Don't try to pull a loop only try to pull / push the short end of the loop. If the loop starts only with enough string to reach the other side it continues to get easier the closer to get to the other side. Keeping the next cross to be tensioned as high as possible opens up a path making it easier.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Man, I have tried pulling a loop so many times...and it just hasn’t come. Different strokes for different folks. :)
The first thirty or so years, I pushed. The last 10 or so, I've pulled. I taught myself to pull and I am hooked. It's much easier for me and easier on the hands and I think the string down toward the end of the crosses.
 

jim e

Legend
The first thirty or so years, I pushed. The last 10 or so, I've pulled. I taught myself to pull and I am hooked. It's much easier for me and easier on the hands and I think the string down toward the end of the crosses.
Just what are you trying to pull here @Rabbit ?

Alu rough is tough on fingers pushing or pulling. Did 4 today, and fingers sore. I need to limit how many of those in one day. RPM Blast rough is no issue, but alu rough is a b*tch for me.
I stopped carrying it in stock,as I thought that would end it, and players are bringing it in for me to string
 
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Purestriker

Semi-Pro
Any thoughts? I'm terrible at weaving. I can kind of weave like the first 2 crosses. Then my hands get too sweaty and I have to weave from not the tip of the string but further down while making some sort of loop. I'm not sure if you guys know what I'm talking about.

Watch the video from tennis spin:
That tool takes a lot of time to use and it didn't look like it helped all that much.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Just what are you trying to pull here @Rabbit ?

Alu rough is tough on fingers pushing or pulling. Did 4 today, and fingers sore. I need to limit how many of those in one day. RPM Blast rough is no issue, but alu rough is a b*tch for me.
I stopped carrying it in stock,as I thought that would end it, and players are bringing it in for me to string
I got one (ALU Rough) a couple of weeks ago and was dreading it. But, it turned out to be not too bad at all. It was terrible to string pushing.
 

jim e

Legend
I got one (ALU Rough) a couple of weeks ago and was dreading it. But, it turned out to be not too bad at all. It was terrible to string pushing.
I have always been a push weaver, and I can push weave at a respectable speed, but Alu rough is one difficult string to push weave, not to say sore fingers after stringing 4 of them one after another. All hybrids alu in crosses.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
That tool takes a lot of time to use and it didn't look like it helped all that much.
I bought one and used it today for the first time. It took some getting used to and I can see how long time weavers would hate it because you now just go straight. Weaving will hurt you and well thats what old stringers will try to do by habit

For me the advantage is that there is less frustration in doing the crosses. There is less friction when doing the crosses and there is less friction when pulling tension… so i think i am getting a tighter job with less wear on the strings.

I found it much much better to thread as close to the tool as possible. Maybe it was my high tensions but it def was easier closer to the tool.

Well worth the investment.
 

loosegroove

Hall of Fame
I found it much much better to thread as close to the tool as possible. Maybe it was my high tensions but it def was easier closer to the tool.
Well that makes sense because with the tool in place, that is where the alternating mains will have the most separation between them.
 
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StringWeaver

New User
Alu rough is tough on fingers pushing or pulling. Did 4 today, and fingers sore. I need to limit how many of those in one day. RPM Blast rough is no issue, but alu rough is a b*tch for me.
I stopped carrying it in stock,as I thought that would end it, and players are bringing it in for me to string
There are a lot of professional stringers who use the StringWeaver or similar tools precisely because it's easier on their fingers. They may not necessarily string faster, at least not until they're used to using the tool, but they may be able to string more racquets in a day because their fingers aren't as sore. A old buddy of mine used to string his racquets weekly with Solinco Barb Wire and his fingers would be bleeding after two racquets.
 

fritzhimself

Semi-Pro
There are a lot of professional stringers who use the StringWeaver or similar tools precisely because it's easier on their fingers.
Really now - but that seems to be more wishful thinking than real.
I don't know any professional stringer who uses something like this.
This is also a question of honor - in my opinion, it is a tool for beginners, or for those people who rarely string and are not really skilled in the craft.
With such "findings" of yours, myths are born and do not correspond to reality.
 

StringWeaver

New User
Really now - but that seems to be more wishful thinking than real.
I don't know any professional stringer who uses something like this.
This is also a question of honor - in my opinion, it is a tool for beginners, or for those people who rarely string and are not really skilled in the craft.
With such "findings" of yours, myths are born and do not correspond to reality.
I respectfully disagree with you because I do know many professional stringers who use string separating tools like this, including a former Racquet Sports Industry Stringer of the Year. Some have written blogs about these tools or made videos. Some have replied to a previous thread on this topic. I freely admit the StringWeaver was designed with the amateur stringer in mind, but have been pleasantly surprised by the number of professionals who have adopted it. I hear from them and they provide me with feedback and suggestions. The reality is that many modern strings, particularly stiff, textured polys, are a pain to weave and folks who string all day long appreciate tools that make their job easier.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
For me the advantage is that there is less frustration in doing the crosses. There is less friction when doing the crosses and there is less friction when pulling tension… so i think i am getting a tighter job with less wear on the strings.
Any comment on what it does to the mains? I've asked this before in these threads, but the sellers have always avoided the question. These devices distort the mains in one direction... and then in the other... and basically yank them up and down 18 to 20 times as you complete the string bed. This sort of pressure would never be put on them using a conventional stringing method, and doesn't feel particularly desirable. The focus is always on the reduced friction, but what had to be done to achieve that is never mentioned.
 

StringWeaver

New User
Actually the question of what it does to the mains has been addressed in previous threads if you wade through all the posts. Do a search on "cross weaving tools" and "string tension and cross stringing tools" and you can find the information. But, I'll reiterate. From the string bed neutral position, the StringWeaver moves half the mains up by one tenth of an inch and half down by one tenth of an inch to create a gap of 0.2 inches. A displacement of a tenth of an inch is far less than the distortion caused when a tennis ball hits the strings--you can see this in super slow-mo videos. Also, professional racquet technicians who have sophisticated measurement equipment have done their own independent tests on identical racquets strung with and without the use of cross-weaving tools. They found no significant difference in measured tension or string bed stiffness.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
Actually the question of what it does to the mains has been addressed in previous threads if you wade through all the posts. Do a search on "cross weaving tools" and "string tension and cross stringing tools" and you can find the information. But, I'll reiterate. From the string bed neutral position, the StringWeaver moves half the mains up by one tenth of an inch and half down by one tenth of an inch to create a gap of 0.2 inches. A displacement of a tenth of an inch is far less than the distortion caused when a tennis ball hits the strings--you can see this in super slow-mo videos. Also, professional racquet technicians who have sophisticated measurement equipment have done their own independent tests on identical racquets strung with and without the use of cross-weaving tools. They found no significant difference in measured tension or string bed stiffness.
Do you have a link to such studies? It would be an interesting read.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Any comment on what it does to the mains? I've asked this before in these threads, but the sellers have always avoided the question. These devices distort the mains in one direction... and then in the other... and basically yank them up and down 18 to 20 times as you complete the string bed. This sort of pressure would never be put on them using a conventional stringing method, and doesn't feel particularly desirable. The focus is always on the reduced friction, but what had to be done to achieve that is never mentioned.
I didnt notice anything significant as far as wear on the mains. Normal weaves displace the strings repeatedly anyhow so not too worried

Also i am using kevlar mains so probably wouldnt notice anyhow. An fwiw i abuse the mains while stringing anyhow. I will “walk tension” from inside to outside and deflect the mains alot while under tension. This tool was a walk in the park for the mains compared to what i do.

Also it seems like you are forgetting the reduction in interstring friction while pulling tension on the crosses has to result in less wear overall vs normal methods
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
I didnt notice anything significant as far as wear on the mains. Normal weaves displace the strings repeatedly anyhow so not too worried

Also i am using kevlar mains so probably wouldnt notice anyhow. An fwiw i abuse the mains while stringing anyhow. I will “walk tension” from inside to outside and deflect the mains alot while under tension. This tool was a walk in the park for the mains compared to what i do.

Also it seems like you are forgetting the reduction in interstring friction while pulling tension on the crosses has to result in less wear overall vs normal methods
Due to your extreme methods, you’d be an interesting case study.

As a hypothesis, what might we expect? Deflecting the mains with the tool - which are tied off at this point, so it’s not quite the same as what you do whilst stringing - you might not be surprised by a decrease in tension. Less friction when pulling the crosses might result in an increase in tension. If this were true - only a hypothesis - then it may be that different tensions are required than you would use stringing without the tool to compensate for lower force on the mains, and greater on the crosses.

I’m not forgetting the friction when pulling crosses, though if conducted with the widely accepted method of fanning the strings, would argue that any wear is so minimal as to be insignificant. Anyone who can visibly see string burn is doing something wrong!

In general, I don’t object to this sort of tool. I can see how it has a place for those who rarely string, and are unlikely to develop particularly proficient weaving skills due to that. And that’s no bad thing, and not meant to be detrimental to those stringers - much like on court, there will be those who are complete beginners, the touring pros, and everything in between. What I do notice though are claims from manufacturers that it’s in some way ‘better’ or ‘gentler’ on the strings, with nothing to back it up.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Due to your extreme methods, you’d be an interesting case study.

I’m not forgetting the friction when pulling crosses, though if conducted with the widely accepted method of fanning the strings, would argue that any wear is so minimal as to be insignificant. Anyone who can visibly see string burn is doing something wrong!
Nobody cares about my extreme methods :)

Anyhow i found your post confusing. Fanning implies just threading the crosses. I am talking about the friction while pulling tension. Normal methods means friction is high while pulling. With the tool the friction WHILE PULLING TENSION is way less. I see that as a big benefit.
 

fritzhimself

Semi-Pro
I respectfully disagree with you because I do know many professional stringers who use string separating tools like this, including a former Racquet Sports Industry Stringer of the Year.
Oh - I forgot that you are the inventor of this tool - sorry for that. Therefore this reply - mea culpa.
Even if John Gugel uses such a cross stringing tool - a professional stringer does not use such a gimmick.
I have made some myself a good 14 years ago and now collect these devices, which also all work.
I've been stringing for decades and I know what I'm talking about.
Your invention is, as you said yourself, for beginners - but never for professionals.
I have also done many stringing jobs, measurements and tests with the things - but see no added value for such a tool.
It's no faster and you don't learn how to string properly either.


 
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