Stringer Recommendations

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by GatorTennis, May 14, 2018.

  1. GatorTennis

    GatorTennis Rookie

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    I did some research on here a while back about stringers. I was set to buy a Prince Neos used, but could never find one locally or on a reputable site (i.e. tennis machines). Their price new does not seem like a great value. My local stringer is raising prices and his customer service has gone downhill, so I am revisiting purchasing a stringer.

    I am thinking I'd like to purchase the Wise constant pull tensioner as well. Given it's been a couple years since my research, I know there are new models out there now. What recommendations do you guys have and why? Thanks in advance for your help!
     
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  2. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    The NEOS is a great machine but since parts are getting hard to find I would have my doubts. BUT!!! If I were in the market for a LO and found one at a good price I would jump on it in a heartbeat. Don't get me worng it is a great machine I would just not be willing to put lots of work into one to get it up and running.

    Since you have done the research before you should have a good idea of what you're looking for. For my vote quit wasting time and get yourself a machine.
     
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  3. RobS

    RobS Rookie

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    I have a NEOS and love it. Finding a good used one at the right price is a bit of a waiting game though. For new machines, Gamma X-ST, Alpha Revo or Axis Pro would be 3 to look at for fixed clamp and crank in the $700-$800 range. I've owned the Gamma X-ST and it's a solid machine for a home stringer. The Axis Pro looks like it could be the best value of the 3 but I haven't seen or used one to speak on the quality. Any of the 3 could take a Wise if you wanted to go that direction at a later date. If you're certain on the Wise or electronic in general I would just go Gamma X-ELS as it would be cheaper than any of the crank options with a Wise. The Gamma X-ELS is probably the best bang for the buck on a an electronic machine for the home stringer.
     
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  4. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    I would recommend either the 1000 1500 or any Alpha. The new version of the Wise is awesome as well.
     
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  5. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Hall of Fame

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    I’ve owned many mid-price stringers from Alpha and Prince. I’ve also owned a Klippermate and a Gamma X2.

    I currently own a Neos 1000 with a Wise but am seriously considering selling it and just going with the X2. I just don’t enjoy stringing for others and I don’t need to string but a dozen times per year. I’m not string sensitive and I think too many people make too big of a deal over this or that.

    Nearly everyone of us will agree that the stringer person is more important than the machine. I’m confident I can do just as good of a job and do it just as quickly on the X2. There’s no point for me to have a Ferrari when the speed limit all around me is 25mph.

    What’s your limit? Will you be stringing for many others often? Do you like tinkering and spending hours weaving string? If so, buy big. If not, get a used Klippermate or X2 and save money. You’ll get good enough to string your racquets proficiently.

    Otherwise, the Alpha machines are a great value and do a fine job for the money. If buying a Wise, I’d look around for an old Ektelon as long as the mounting has been updated. Sometimes you can get them for as little as $100. The only difference is the quickness in mounting a racquet between it and the Neos along with slightly longer glide bars for the Neos. It’s not going to matter unless you’re stringing giant granny racquets.
     
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  6. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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  7. jim e

    jim e Legend

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    If getting a crank and also purchasing a Wise, you may be better off purchasing an electronic machine from the start like the Alpha Ghost.If you plan on stringing for other players as well, you would be best to get as much machine as you can afford, as it will make the job easier.
     
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  8. graycrait

    graycrait Hall of Fame

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    I have a fully reconditioned Prince Neos 1000 from TM for about 1/2 price of new. It is the only machine I have owned. I am going to sound redundant but I see the local uni's Gamma ELS used everyday all day. That thing has never quit. I will not change from my NEOS 1000, but then I drive a 2001 Honda CRV - that may say something. But if I were going to buy a machine that was tethered to electricity I would buy the Gamma. If I win the lottery I might buy a Wilson Bairdo. I need to buy a lottery ticket more than once a year.
     
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  9. GatorTennis

    GatorTennis Rookie

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    Going to take your advice and see if i can find the Ektelon. I had forgotten which brand was similar to the NEOS.

    For the rest of you guys, thanks for the suggestions, and I'm wide open. I probably should have given more background. I'm going to string for personal use. I'm over the poly string fad and going back to syn gut or multi. I'll probably string a couple racquets a month and have no desire to string for others. Although if I do follow thru with the purchase, I will probably string more to tinker with tension and string types. Not to mention playing with more racquets in my collection.

    So keep the ideas coming, but I think i am set on a constant pull machine.
     
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  10. gmatheis

    gmatheis Hall of Fame

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    Do the math. If you plan on stringing 2 racquets per month and your stringer charges you $15 labor that's $360/yr.

    How many years do you think it is reasonable for your investment to recover it's own costs? two? three?

    If you feel 2-3 years is fair then your price point is $720 - $1080

    You get the idea ... plug your own numbers in and come up with your price.

    ----------------------

    Then let me throw one more thought into the mix for machines ... check out stringway. Their tabletop stringer with fixed clamps is about $950 with shipping. It's a constant pull dropweight that doesn't need to be horizontal to get proper tension.

    Alpha revo (700) or gamma st II (770) _ wise (625) = $1325 to $1395

    Used Neos (lets say 600) and wise(625) is still $1225
     
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  11. John Doe

    John Doe New User

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  12. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    ^^ I don’t want to start WW3 here (again). But I think it’s important to point out that Stringway is a stringing machine manufacturer. So, however informative these articles Stringway puts out may be....any stringing manufacturer who puts out such information may or may not be objective in doing so.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2018
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  13. John Doe

    John Doe New User

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    The article contains interesting technical information about stringing machines, not recommendation to buy Stringway machine.
    Have you read it? Probably not.
    Read it, then decide, no pressure.
    By the way, there's nothing wrong with Stringway machines.
     
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  14. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    Actually, I did read it.

    You’re certainly entitled to your opinion. I found some of the statements made to be lacking in scientific proof to back them up. And again, I can’t help but question how a manufacturer can possibly be objective in writing this type of material.

    By the way, I didn’t say there was anything wrong with Stringway’s machines (I actually think they make really good stuff).
     
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  15. John Doe

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    Never trust anyone completely but God.. It happens.

    I do trust Stringway. What scientific proof do you need? We can ask Stringway. They are open to discussion.
     
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  16. John Doe

    John Doe New User

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  17. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    Ummm...Ok.

    Am I to conclude you believe Stringway is God?

    LOL. Did you read any of my responses?

    Not entirely sure what to make of that link...
     
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  18. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    Personally, I didn't like the Ektelon Model H that much. It was great most of the time, but when the racket holding clamps began to wear the dogs out, the post that is held to keep it tight worms its way up to where it can go through the bottom of the rubber pad, and damage the frame. No warning. The 1st time that happened to me, I bought the woman a new Yonex 1700, got new dogs from Tennis Machines, replaced them, then sold it I got Alpha's top of the line crank (Apex I think) and a Wise head. Have been pleased with everything except a few of the clamps. But, the 6-point mounting system holds the racket firmly. Maybe eventually a Ghost, but happy with this for now.
     
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  19. John Doe

    John Doe New User

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    I'll try to make it simple, you need it.
    I know Fred Timmer. Stringing machines are not just his business, but also his hobby.
    He is an engineer with many years of experience in design of stringing machines.
    You found that some of (Stringway) "statements made to be lacking in scientific proof".
    Basically, you made polite statement that Stringway posted false technical information.
    Instead of reading your sarcasm, I prefer to read your scientific proof.
     
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  20. Wes

    Wes Semi-Pro

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    Brand new profile/user.
    Every post (thus far) is Stringway, Stringway, Stringway (and I have nothing, at all, against Stringway).

    However...
    Anyone familiar with the phrase "Me thinks thou doth protest too much"?
     
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  21. Karma Tennis

    Karma Tennis Hall of Fame

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    It is usually more than that because one has to factor the cost of getting the racquet to the stringer and then collecting it from the stringer if they don't do the job on the spot. There is also the value of time expended to do that.

    And a more important point that is nearly always forgotten. If you are stringing your own racquets then you should be factoring your own time into the equation.

    For example, if it takes you an hour to string one racquet, you have saved the (min.) $15 you would have had to pay another stringer to do the job. However, if you can earn $22 in that hour doing something else, you are better off doing something else and paying a stringer the $15 to do the stringing job for you. (I use $22 per hour on the basis that one would pay income tax in the order of 33%). If you "value" your time at $0 per hour, then this is not relevant.
     
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  22. gmatheis

    gmatheis Hall of Fame

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    Putting a price on your own time only makes sense if you give up time to string that you would be doing something else (such as working) because you don't make $22 every hour of the day.

    If you string while watching tv , and you would normally watch some tv anyway your time cost actually is 0.

    same with cost of getting your racquet to a stringer and back ... for many people they just drop it off at the club while they are there to play anyway, so there is no cost. Unless you usually make a specific trip to your stringer and don't just mix it in with a trip to the store or something.
     
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  23. esgee48

    esgee48 Legend

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    I would disagree with the assessment above. Whether you are doing something else anyway IN addition to string, e.g. watching TV, you are still doing it. What may take 35 minutes takes 65 minutes. The IRS does not care if you drive to the market to pick up food/have breakfast as you drive to a client's office for a meeting for mileage purposes. If you are an attorney, if you have to do research for precedents, you may do 1-3 cases at the same time. The client will be billed as if they were doing the research solely for a client.
     
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  24. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    You don’t want to read sarcasm, but no problem dishing it out, eh?

    Good for you.

    Good for him.

    That may be your interpretation of what I said...but that’s not what i said. I said what I meant, exactly the way I meant to say it. Questioning “facts not in evidence” and calling someone a liar are not (basically) the same thing.

    Here, I’ll make this final point simple for you - so you don’t have to put words in my mouth. None of what you said refutes the obvious conflict of interest Stringway has in both manufacturing stringing machines, and disseminating information asserting which types of machines are superior, and what people ought to buy.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2018
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  25. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    Just to provide an example of one of the statements I find questionable:

    “For a tension unit a very simple rule counts:
    Tension is a mechanical unit, which is best created with a mechanical system.”

    The origin of this rule is unclear in reading the document (although I think it’s obvious who came up with it). And it is unclear to me, from the document, what scientific data were used (if any) to declare this rule. If such a rule was valid and widely accepted, then why are grand slam stringing rooms filled with electronic constant pull machines? Why are the P1 guys still traveling with Babolat Star 4 machines? Why are so many not following the rule?
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2018
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  26. John Doe

    John Doe New User

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    Ah.. you just don't understand.. it explains. Sorry about this.
     
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  27. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    Yeah, that must be it. :rolleyes:

    OP, my apologies for dumping on your thread. Here’s my 2 cents on your original question:

    IMHO very difficult to go wrong with a new Alpha or Gamma floor standing crank machine, and adding a WISE. Both mfg’s make a really solid product and offer excellent customer service, in my experience (I’ve owned machines from both brands).

    NEOS 1000 (and their Ektelon brothers) are great machines, too - built like tanks. The current shortage of available parts is a bit of a concern, though.

    I also agree with those that suggested the Gamma X-ELS. By so many accounts, it’s a really solid machine (although I haven’t had the opportunity to put my own hands on one).

    Is there a budget you had in mind? If money is less of an object, take a hard look at the Alpha Ghost.
     
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  28. GatorTennis

    GatorTennis Rookie

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    Not really a budget, just looking for value. I'll probably string 2-6 times a month if I start tinkering with my other racquets as well. I don't need anything phenomenal, just something easy to use that will give me a solid string job. I'm not really a fan of the crank tensioners from what I've read.
     
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  29. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    I'm a lifelong Klippermate fan.
     
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  30. gmatheis

    gmatheis Hall of Fame

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    You are missing the point … you don't get paid for watching TV. If you just sacrifice 30 minutes of leisure time (watching tv,sitting on the couch, reading a paper etc) this time isn't worth some specific dollar amount because you aren't being paid for it. You don't get paid 24/7 for your time.

    On top of that depending on what time you are giving up you may not actually be giving up anything. If you normally unwind after work with a drink and watching the sunset and you set up your stringer by a window and have a drink while stringing and enjoying the sunset you may not have given up anything at all.
     
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  31. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, for me it's a totally enjoyable thing. It's a way of being creative, too. When I was a lad, I was always busy with scout handicrafts, etc., fix-it stuff. Scratches that itch for me, and it is relaxing as well. I usually do this on a Sunday morning, very early, as the sun rises, with a cup of coffee and news radio, outside in the cool of the summer morn. It's nice.
     
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  32. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    If you haven’t already, read up on the Gamma X-ELS. Most new machines worth their salt, and adding a WISE head....will be more $$ than the X-ELS brand new. Now, if you could find a solid used crank machine, and then add a WISE....you might do better price wise (than the X-ELS).
     
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  33. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    ^^ You’re right - I took that statement quite literally, without consideration of the meaning of the term, “mechanical system.” So, I guess I have egg on my face. C’est la vie.

    Maybe I’m too unintelligent to read this stuff. Or maybe it’s unfair to expect simple, easy to read writings from an engineer. Maybe both. I dunno.

    Regardless, said writings, to me, often have a tone of condescension, which I find rather unprofessional for a company that produces quality product. In addition, said literature frequently indirectly or even directly disparages competitors and their respective products. This does seem to cultivate somewhat of a cult following of the brand. But it also rubs a lot of people (like me) the wrong way. From where I’m sitting, talk up your stuff, why it’s the best, etc. all you want. Why any company who makes a solid product has to bash their competitors in their literature is beyond me.

    Having said that, to the OP - the reason I did not recommend a machine from Stringway has nothing to do with the above. It’s because you mentioned wanting a WISE tension head - which might be a bit more of a challenge to retrofit to a Stringway machine, maybe than some of the other options.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
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  34. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    Just to be crystal clear, they are not similar, they are identical. The only difference is the Ektelon is branded in blue and the Prince in green.
     
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  35. jim e

    jim e Legend

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    I agree with above.
    Also very strange that all of the only 10 posts that John Doe posted was in praise of one brand of machine.
    No other posts on any other topic!
    Sounds like he either works for the company or owns it and posts anonymously.
    I guess its a way to promote a machine, but it takes away from other very good quality machines out there.
    Others would not even know that it is a bias opinion with this to say the least!
    I would think that TW would not want someone to promote their own machine on these forums??
    Anyone else feel this way or is it just me ??
     
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  36. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    OK, read. I don't think it takes an engineer to figure out this is not an unbiased guide to choosing a machine. Rather, it's a straightforward marketing paper which rather unabashedly favors Stringway. I love how the "guide" shows the "best" and illustrates same with a picture of some Stringway component. The beam-in-a-wall example if a stretch at best and not exactly scientific method or proof. It's contrived at best. The direct/indirect racket support is also a direct picture of Stringway's mounting system and a knock against mostly everybody else's who uses a 6-point. Personally, I loved the 1500's mounting system which is like the Stringway's, but then the "guide" loses me with:

    This statement doesn't say that if you use a Babolat Star 5 or an Alpha Ghost or a Wilson Baiardo you'll crack rackets but it sure does deliver a strong hint at it. And, truthfully, there is no empirical data included here at lest to suggest one is better than the other. Quite the contrary, if you look at the higher end machines, all have he same mounting system, the one the "guide" says isn't so good.

    The points of a "good" machine are rather transparent as well, drop weights are better than electronic, lock outs are the most inaccurate, foot pedal operated machines are the best, electronics are the slowest..... (strangely coincidental that all the "good" stuff just happens to be a feature of the Stringway)

    I wouldn't base my decision on this "guide" for sure.
     
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  37. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    @Rabbit and @jim e - well said, and no surprise, I agree 100%.

    Now, cue the “TW gang” comments.
     
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  38. AndI

    AndI Rookie

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    Gator Tennis,

    I own a Gamma X-ELS and wrote a detailed review of this machine on this forum at the time when I bought it, about 9 months ago. So far, I had no issues with this machine, it does a good job, but I since I did not own any other machines, I do not really know how much it is better or worse than the others.

    What I would like to do, is to share a couple of surprising and unexpected observations which I made in the past 9 months.

    1. Stringing for yourself is a fun hobby because it expands your understanding how racquet works and how strings impact the racquet performance. This may not, and most likely will not make you a better player, but it will create for you a new, fun aspect in the whole art of tennis. There is much more to learn and understand than one thinks before he bought a machine. It is like taking yet another unknown from the equation. Sharing your knowledge and helping your friends may also help with opening new horizons for them and is a gratifying experience.

    2. ROI considerations - how much money you would save by stringing for yourself - make no sense. At least, they made no sense to me, as it turned out. I did not save any money. I ended up spending a lot more money. In the past, we would restring our racquets quite rarely as we had no true feel for the quality of strings or tension drop over the time, and taking racquets to a shop was a hassle. Once you start stringing for yourself, you experiment a lot more with strings and tensions and quickly develop a totally new level of feel for strings and their condition. You want to try new things because they are easily accessible (you can restring in the afternoon and go try right after). In 9 months after buying the machine, I spent estimated $1300 on stringing tools and strings. Double it up to include the cost of the machine. This alone would cover my stringing needs at a pro store through the end of my tennis life, with some change left to spare.

    3. Any stringing machine enables you to get good results. Many people here string with dropweight, even though it might require a little more time to get used to. Tennis Warehouse uses exclusively Neos (I called them and asked, to confirm), probably for the sake of maintaining consistency over many years. Many stores use Bairdo due to its ergonomics. Major tournaments use either Bairdos or upper level Babolats, for the same reason, to enable their stringers to string as many racquets as they can as quickly as they can. Home owners use the whole spectrum in between. Regardless of the amount of electronics, they all use similar principles. For home stringers, ergonomics does not matter much, speed makes relatively little difference. What is left? Let's be honest, there is a significant "toy" component in a personal stringing machine. You rarely NEED it, usually you WANT it.

    Why don't you just look at the pictures and descriptions and decide which of the toys in the tennis toy store attracts you more and which you can afford to buy and for which you have enough room in your home, to sit there permanently? I think it will be a fair approach. Otherwise, if you do not like to think about it as a toy, define more specific parameters for making your choice rather than parameters that you shared ("good value for several racquets per month").

    Noone, really, has tried all machines out there and most people did not try more than a couple. Most replies sound like "I have machine "X" and I like it". Negative reviews are very rare (which implies, all machines work). Noone can tell you more by way of comparing brands and models than you can find yourself in Google. This forum is a great place to find owners of the machine which you almost decided to order and ask them questions about their experience with this brand and model, but you can't get a meaningful answer to a generic question "which stringing machine to buy".
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
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  39. MAX PLY

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    ^^^Well stated, Andl.
     
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  40. graycrait

    graycrait Hall of Fame

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    If you think a stringing machine is going to save you money then you have more discipline than I have. One of my new hobbies is to try out string, even encouraging my friends to try my concoctions for free. Lately I have changed my "business model." You pay the cost of the string I'll string it for free labor. I only do that for the people I hit with.
     
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  41. AndI

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    Graicrait, I am glad to hear that I am not the only one who does that!

    Another crazy thing which a stinging machine owner might do - I lately restrung at my own cost a demo racquet which I was interested in, just to see how it feels with strings which are not the cheapest on the market and which were not overdue for restringing some time before last Christmas. I took my ERT-300 to a local racquet shop to get some demos, measured almost all racquets in stock (I estimate, between 50 and 75) and found only 3 with DT somewhere above totally dead - and even those had $4 synthetic gut on them. With such strings, you can tell very little about the racquets. They will all feel and perform like crap.

    Ignorance is bliss and so is a lack of a stringing machine at home. An idea that a demo racquet must be restrung before trying it would never cross my mind a year ago. But somehow I feel good about someone getting an opportunity to try a natural gut based hybrid on a demo racquet, after I return it :)
     
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  42. graycrait

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    That is fascinating and logically not surprising.

    I'm sure it is counterproductive to my game but I get kind of excited to try out new to me strings and like to ask locals what kind of strings they use and why? Also what I have found is that many have no idea why they are using that string and if it matches their game, equipment and budget. Way too much poly out there being used in poor applications.
     
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  43. Karma Tennis

    Karma Tennis Hall of Fame

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    @gmatheis, I think you are missing the point.

    Stringing a tennis racquet requires effort. Regardless of what many think, the process requires a lot more effort than all the other examples you have provided us with - except perhaps for having that 10th or 11th drink!

    Unless you are some sort of Marketing Genius or Sales Guru, I doubt you could convince most people to pay you for watching TV etc. But you could easily charge for stringing tennis racquets. That activity has an intrinsic financial value that your other examples don't.

    I stand by what I say. If you could be doing something else and making more money, then from a financial perspective you are better off paying someone else to string your racquets if they can produce similar or better results.

    I do understand your viewpoint. Personally, I would rather do something else and pay someone else to string my racquets

    Viewing sunsets is a lot more enjoyable when you are not being distracted by weaving cross strings, blocked grommet holes, or tricky tie-off knots.
     
    #43
  44. AndI

    AndI Rookie

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    A very keen observation! This, however, is easily explainable: they come to a local racquet shop or tennis desk at their fitness club and ask for recommendation, expecting an expert advice. The shop sells them a string which they have in stock, and they usually carry strings which have a solid profit margin and which are easy to string. Poly is great in this respect.

    A year ago, my son read what Federer uses and wanted to try the same strings. We went to one of local stores and he asked for Wilson Champions Choice. They said, we do not have it, but we can offer something very similar - how about Solinco Hyper G? Even my son knew that poly is not quite the same as gut+poly, so he refused. Then they sold him a hybrid, a soft multifilament with Alu Power, which is resembles Champions Choice only by the words "alu power" - but they said it feels almost the same. Well, it did not. I do not think that people who work at the stores actually tried all the strings that they sell and know how they feel. But they know that they should not let customer go away. On the other hand, put yourself in the position of store manager: customers can rarely explain what they need, beyond generic words (more spin and more control; or more spin and more power; or more spin, more control, more power, and more arm-friendly) which might sound like a broken record, over and over again. What strings do you want? I don't know, something with more spin. What strings do you have? I don't remember, you guys installed them. What tension do you want? I do not know, can you measure tension on my old strings and tell me? - no wonder half of town plays with the same 2-3 types of strings which might be a bad fit for them.

    A stringer who can assess your true needs and tell you what strings you really need is worth its weight in gold - and he probably should see you play. Or you should be your own stringer and should not hesitate to experiment.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
    #44
  45. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    7,592
    Get a Stringway drop weight. It is the only drop weight that doesn't require a level arm when tensioning and this actually works so you get an accurate tension at any angle. This makes it easy to string. Get double action fixed clamps as this is much easier and provides quick and accurate string jobs. It is also true constant pull as the tension arm is pulling until the string is released from the tensioiner. I like true constant pull as the string jobs feel accurate and crisp.

    It is also made of primarily heavy weight metal which will last a lifetime if cared for.

    A crank is based on a spring and will lose accuracy over time.

    An electronic is based on small motors that will lose accuracy due to wear and tear.

    The Stringway is based on heavy metal and gravity and these are both pretty consistent and durable.

    Last I looked, a new Stringway table top, double action fixed clamps machine was around a $1,000. it is well worth it.

    I got mine under the LaSerFibre brand which is the same machine as Stringway but different distributor. Mine is 11.5 years old and still going strong. I got lucky and paid $640 including shipping/tax and they sent me about 6 packs of string too.

    I also bought a simple machine stand for about $50 and added wheels. You could also likely use a microwave stand with cabinets used to store string.
     
    GatorTennis likes this.
    #45
  46. tennisbike

    tennisbike Rookie

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    Sorry, can you define dead? Is it a certain DT value? tension value?
     
    #46
  47. tennisbike

    tennisbike Rookie

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    Enjoying doing something is highly personal. For many of us, stringing, trying new strings, trying new rackets is like learning, exploring new things within the domain of enjoying tennis. And that is why we are all here reading and writing all these non-sense about tennis. joke!
     
    #47
  48. SavvyStringer

    SavvyStringer Semi-Pro

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Location:
    South Carolina
    Why don't you just grab one of the gamma table top with the rotational gripper? Between a used neos and a wise you're likely in that $1200 range anyway. I know a couple guys that use them as road machines for college teams and the rotational gripper seems to work fine. They're also easily movable.
     
    #48
  49. AndI

    AndI Rookie

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    Location:
    Portland, OR
    tennisbike, it is subjective: since I usually see DT between 36 and 42 on freshly strung racquets with as-installed string tensions ranging from 56 to 52 Lbs, so I considered anything below 32 "dead". and anything between 32 and 36 "almost dead".The approximate conversion table provided with ERT-300, albeit very generic and not very accurate, suggests that DT=32 corresponds to string tension between 43 and 47 Lbs. Many racquets had DT in the 26 - 28 range, a few would not give any reading at all.

    With ERT-300, the usual recommendation is to restring when DT drops 10% to 20% from as-strung value, 15% is a good target.
     
    #49
  50. tennisbike

    tennisbike Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2016
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    Andl: Thanks for your response.

    Off Topic: I use my Stringmeter religiously immediately after each stringing or from time to time over each main/cross intersection. I found Stringmeter inexpensive and I think it gives me a micro, or spot, view of the string stiffness on the stringbed. I am not sure what DT really means and I am not convinced that ERT-300 actually provides a macro view of the stringbed, since it is mounted to a relatively small section on the stringbed. But anyway, they give us something to correlate to the "feel" of the stringbed.

    On Stringway dropweight machine, the constant tension system sounds impressive and the idea is simple, and the use is simple.Why aren't the system used more commonly? My question is on a stretchy string such as synthetic gut, what do you do if you have to pull a longer stretch of string. Is there a ratchet?
     
    John Doe likes this.
    #50

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