Stringing a PS 85

Gabriel Sara

New User
Hi everyone, i bought a stringing machine and i need help to string my Wilson PS 6.0 85. From what i read the crosses should be strung top to bottom, but i’m looking ay my racket and apparently they are strung bottom up.
Can anyone help me understand how should it be done?
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
The easy way would be to string the racquet via the 2 piece method.

There’s many videos which illustrate this. Here’s an example:

 

esgee48

Legend
PRO STAFF 6.0 ORIGINAL 85 [T=top of hoop, B=bottom of hoop]
Range:50 - 60
Lengths:18'M - 16'C
Pattern:16x18
Skip Mains:7,9T - 7,9B
MTO:6B
1st X:7T
XTO:5T - 8B

You could do a Yonex loop for the last 2 outer mains to come out at 8B to tie off at 6B. I have seen the PS 6.0 85 with crosses top down and bottom up. I do not think it really makes any difference. 3¢
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
If you use a Yonex loop you will block grommet 7T with two strings, also if you tie off the mains at 6T you block 7T with two strings. Don't do that tie off mains at 8T and bottom cross at 6T.

Back in the 80s when this frame came out Wilson did not allow for bottom up stringing. You either used 2 piece or an ATW pattern
 

Wes

Semi-Pro
Hi everyone, i bought a stringing machine and i need help to string my Wilson PS 6.0 85. From what i read the crosses should be strung top to bottom, but i’m looking ay my racket and apparently they are strung bottom up.
Can anyone help me understand how should it be done?
Gabriel, congrats on getting your own machine.
The recommendations above aren't necessarily "bad" or "wrong", but here's a little more detail for you.

The PS 85 has mains 16 mains and the mains start at the throat. By virtue of these 2 facts, your mains will end at the throat.

So, this means you essentially have 3 options...
a 2pc. job (which means the outer mains, on both sides, will be tied off at the throat)...
a 1pc. job (stringing the crosses from the bottom to the top)...
a 1pc. Around The World pattern (which would allow you to string the crosses top down).

If you are doing any sort of hybrid, you're forced into doing it as a 2pc. job.(and it doesn't sound like you are, since you referenced bottom up stringing of the crosses).
If you are using the same string for mains & crosses, then all 3 choices, mentioned above, are possible.

2pc.
2pc. is normally the most simple/easiest for people to learn. However, the PS 85 (and many other racquets) will pose a few more difficulties, if you do choose to do it 2pc.
Namely, there will be a total of 6 blocked holes - and 2 of those holes will be "double blocked" by 2 strings, rather than a single string, on the outside of the frame.

Since the PS 85 has "double skips" at the throat (7T & 9T) and the mains tie off at 6T, you are going to encounter issues later, when installing the very bottom cross.
That bottom cross string will need to pass through each of the 7T grommets, which you will disappointingly find blocked by 2 strings covering those holes (due to where the mains were previously tied off).
Navigating that bottom cross past a double blocked hole (on both sides of the frame) isn't really a fun endeavor... especially if you are using a soft type of string.
You'll encounter this issue regardless of whether you choose to employ the use of a "Yonex Loop" or not.

Now, you will also have a blocked hole at both 9T grommets too, but they will only have a single string covering them, which isn't nearly as much of an issue to get around.
Note: When stringing 2pc., you will have a blocked hole at both 9H grommets at the head of the frame (that is... unless you pre-weave the top 2 or 3 crosses, before you finish tensioning the outer mains. Personally, I highly recommend doing this anytime/everytime you're doing a standard 2pc. job).

1pc. (crosses bottom up)
As for doing a 1pc. job and stringing the crosses bottom up... I would never do it that way, but there are some people who don't care.
So, for completeness, I have mentioned it as a possible option... even though, personally, I never would.

1pc. (Around The World)
Note: a starting clamp (or additional floating clamp) is needed. However, this is the case with most, but not all, ATW patterns.
When not doing a hybrid job, this is the method that I prefer (for a PS 85) - and would recommend (for those that have a good sense of what they're doing).

An ATW pattern allows you to install the crosses from head to throat, even when the mains (ordinarily) end at the throat.
However... ATW patterns aren't really "one size fits all". It's not a great idea to know only one ATW and then use it on any/all frames.
If you attempted to do that, it's likely that you would eventually damage a frame.
Different ATW patterns have certain pros/cons, so it's a very good idea to know multiple ATW patterns (in addition to why one pattern is better suited than another).

The UKRSA ATW is the specific ATW pattern that I personally use (and would recommend) for the PS 85, and here is why...
  • Most importantly, the transition areas (going from a main to a cross, or a cross to a main) have sufficient spacing between the grommet holes. If this spacing is insufficient (as it might be with a different ATW pattern), then there would be a risk of collapsing the small amount of graphite that resides between the 2 grommet holes.
  • Fewer blocked holes are created, therefore you will have fewer to contend with later on. In fact, there will only be 4 blocked holes (none "double blocked"). Of these 4 blocked holes, 3 will be on the same side of the frame (the Short Side) and 1 will be on the Long Side. Example: if you designate the LEFT side of your frame to be the Short Side, then 10H, 10T and 7T will be the 3 blocked holes on the left half of the frame. The right half of the frame (Long Side) will have 7T as it's only blocked hole. Note: Just prior to tensioning the 3rd cross... if you push several inches of the end of the Short Side string through the grommet at 10H, it won't even get blocked at all - thereby reducing blocked holes to a total of just 3.
  • Unlike some other ATW patterns, the UKRSA ATW pattern does not have a bottom cross installed early on, so there is no counting crosses (i.e. same weave as top cross for odd # of crosses, opposite weave as top cross for even # of crosses etc.) - thus no potential misweave.
  • Unlike some other ATW patterns, the UKRSA ATW pattern does not have a bottom cross installed early on, so there aren't any true "hard weaves". It has only 4 "semi hard weaves", all of which are at the periphery of the frame (the outer main on each side, top cross, and bottom cross).
  • Since there are only 2 knots (rather than 4) you will have no tension loss (drawback) on the outer mains, and only have a slight tension loss on the top and bottom cross (the last 2 strings before tying off).
  • Since there are only 2 knots (rather than 4) you will only need enough string, for the final pulls, to reach your tensioner TWICE, rather than 4 times. If you are using a set of string (rather than cutting from a reel) then this won't matter very much.
  • If you are cutting string from a reel, it will save you some string. It will require about 2 feet less string to do an ATW pattern versus a 2pc. job. This will depend on how much string is normally required for you to reach your tensioner. If you only need 1 foot to reach your tensioner (like my machine) then it will save you 2 feet. If you need 1.5 feet to reach your tensioner, then you'd save 3 feet of string. The last time I strung a PS 85 (at 60lbs with a very stretchy multifilament), I only needed 29 feet of string (just under 9m) using this ATW pattern.


If you've strung a few racquets before, and have a good sense of what you're doing, then I would recommend using the UKRSA Around The World pattern. It works very well on this particular frame.

A few questions of importance...
  1. Have you strung ANY other racquets yet, or are you trying to do your PS 6.0 85 as your very first string job? It may not be the easiest/best choice for one's very first frame.
  2. Exactly what kind of machine are you working with? Specifically, does your machine have fixed clamps or are you using floating/flying clamps? Regardless of whether you choose to do 2pc. or 1pc. ATW, things will be easier with fixed clamps - and trickier if you have floating/flying clamps.
  3. Exactly what type of string are you planning to use? Stiffer strings are easier to navigate past blocked holes than softer strings are.
  4. Assuming you do have a fixed clamp machine, does it have swivel clamps or glide bar clamps?
  5. Do you have a starting clamp or extra floating/flying clamp available?
  6. Are you cutting string from a reel, or using sets of string?
 
Last edited:

esgee48

Legend
If I received one to string and they said no hybrid, then the [UK] ATW is the way to go, especially as I pull string from reels. There are multiple threads on dealing with blocked holes. You can leave a piece of scrape string in each blocked hole or leave a 'puller string' to move the blocking strings. In either case, blocked holes really aren't an issue after a few times. :)
 

jim e

Legend
For consistency I typically string most jobs 2 piece , unless the racquet is a natural 1 piece job. I strung just about every atw pattern at one time or another, and now just string most as a 2 piece.
With all the hybrids those can only be 2 piece, and I string a lot of natural gut and with 2 piece the string gets handled less, and all racquets are strung top down.This way a player gives me his racquet that he gave me before, he gets the same job back each time.Also I have never been asked by a player for a 1 or 2 piece job.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
If I received one to string and they said no hybrid, then the [UK] ATW is the way to go, especially as I pull string from reels. There are multiple threads on dealing with blocked holes. You can leave a piece of scrape string in each blocked hole or leave a 'puller string' to move the blocking strings. In either case, blocked holes really aren't an issue after a few times. :)
Wilson recommended a universal ATW. Using the universal ATW blocked holes can be all but eliminated. I can post a picture of Wilson’s ATW pattern if you like @Gabriel Sara.
 
Last edited:

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Yes, please!


EDIT : Not sure if you noticed but is you look on the right top the crosses are looped over the ends of the bumper (if you have one) from X2 to X4 and X3 to X5. The original Chicago PS did not have a bumper guard. If that is the racket you have don’t replace the original grommets with the bumper grommet set as they do not fit properly. (All grommets except the bumper fit well.) wilson had a lot of breakages with people replace the original grommet set on the Chicago PS.

EDIT: Also thelines are not quite drawn right on the outside of the frame so just follow the arrows.

EDIT: You also can’t trust stringing instructions. They got their left and right sides confused. The short side shown on the right should be 8’ 9”.

EDIT: If I were stringing that frameid use a Yonex loop on the short side main 1-5, then 7th main, finish with the 6th main, and tie off at 5H.
 
Last edited:

Gabriel Sara

New User


EDIT : Not sure if you noticed but is you look on the right top the crosses are looped over the ends of the bumper (if you have one) from X2 to X4 and X3 to X5. The original Chicago PS did not have a bumper guard. If that is the racket you have don’t replace the original grommets with the bumper grommet set as they do not fit properly. (All grommets except the bumper fit well.) wilson had a lot of breakages with people replace the original grommet set on the Chicago PS.

EDIT: Also thelines are not quite drawn right on the outside of the frame so just follow the arrows.

EDIT: You also can’t trust stringing instructions. They got their left and right sides confused. The short side shown on the right should be 8’ 9”.

EDIT: If I were stringing that frameid use a Yonex loop on the short side main 1-5, then 7th main, finish with the 6th main, and tie off at 5H.
I have the new ones, that tennis wharehouse used to sell online. I do have an old racket from my father: Wilson Sting Midsize. Where did you get the picture?
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I have the new ones, that tennis wharehouse used to sell online. I do have an old racket from my father: Wilson Sting Midsize. Where did you get the picture?
That picture came from an old USRSA Stringer's Digest. If your Sting is the MS you can use the same pattern for both.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
If you use the universal ATW pattern I would suggest running in all the long side mains before you ever pull tension on any main. The tension and clamp the center 12 mains (6 on each side. Then run in the bottom cross, the outer main on the short side, and the top 2 crosses all with the long side string. Then finish up the short side last main and tie off. Everything else is done with the long side. Tie off the bottom (17th cross) at either 8T or 6T which ever is easier for you.
 

Gabriel Sara

New User
Gabriel, congrats on getting your own machine.
The recommendations above aren't necessarily "bad" or "wrong", but here's a little more detail for you.

The PS 85 has mains 16 mains and the mains start at the throat. By virtue of these 2 facts, your mains will end at the throat.

So, this means you essentially have 3 options...
a 2pc. job (which means the outer mains, on both sides, will be tied off at the throat)...
a 1pc. job (stringing the crosses from the bottom to the top)...
a 1pc. Around The World pattern (which would allow you to string the crosses top down).

If you are doing any sort of hybrid, you're forced into doing it as a 2pc. job.(and it doesn't sound like you are, since you referenced bottom up stringing of the crosses).
If you are using the same string for mains & crosses, then all 3 choices, mentioned above, are possible.

2pc.
2pc. is normally the most simple/easiest for people to learn. However, the PS 85 (and many other racquets) will pose a few more difficulties, if you do choose to do it 2pc.
Namely, there will be a total of 6 blocked holes - and 2 of those holes will be "double blocked" by 2 strings, rather than a single string, on the outside of the frame.

Since the PS 85 has "double skips" at the throat (7T & 9T) and the mains tie off at 6T, you are going to encounter issues later, when installing the very bottom cross.
That bottom cross string will need to pass through each of the 7T grommets, which you will disappointingly find blocked by 2 strings covering those holes (due to where the mains were previously tied off).
Navigating that bottom cross past a double blocked hole (on both sides of the frame) isn't really a fun endeavor... especially if you are using a soft type of string.
You'll encounter this issue regardless of whether you choose to employ the use of a "Yonex Loop" or not.

Now, you will also have a blocked hole at both 9T grommets too, but they will only have a single string covering them, which isn't nearly as much of an issue to get around.
Note: When stringing 2pc., you will have a blocked hole at both 9H grommets at the head of the frame (that is... unless you pre-weave the top 2 or 3 crosses, before you finish tensioning the outer mains. Personally, I highly recommend doing this anytime/everytime you're doing a standard 2pc. job).

1pc. (crosses bottom up)
As for doing a 1pc. job and stringing the crosses bottom up... I would never do it that way, but there are some people who don't care.
So, for completeness, I have mentioned it as a possible option... even though, personally, I never would.

1pc. (Around The World)
Note: a starting clamp (or additional floating clamp) is needed. However, this is the case with most, but not all, ATW patterns.
When not doing a hybrid job, this is the method that I prefer (for a PS 85) - and would recommend (for those that have a good sense of what they're doing).

An ATW pattern allows you to install the crosses from head to throat, even when the mains (ordinarily) end at the throat.
However... ATW patterns aren't really "one size fits all". It's not a great idea to know only one ATW and then use it on any/all frames.
If you attempted to do that, it's likely that you would eventually damage a frame.
Different ATW patterns have certain pros/cons, so it's a very good idea to know multiple ATW patterns (in addition to why one pattern is better suited than another).

The UKRSA ATW is the specific ATW pattern that I personally use (and would recommend) for the PS 85, and here is why...
  • Most importantly, the transition areas (going from a main to a cross, or a cross to a main) have sufficient spacing between the grommet holes. If this spacing is insufficient (as it might be with a different ATW pattern), then there would be a risk of collapsing the small amount of graphite that resides between the 2 grommet holes.
  • Fewer blocked holes are created, therefore you will have fewer to contend with later on. In fact, there will only be 4 blocked holes (none "double blocked"). Of these 4 blocked holes, 3 will be on the same side of the frame (the Short Side) and 1 will be on the Long Side. Example: if you designate the LEFT side of your frame to be the Short Side, then 10H, 10T and 7T will be the 3 blocked holes on the left half of the frame. The right half of the frame (Long Side) will have 7T as it's only blocked hole. Note: Just prior to tensioning the 3rd cross... if you push several inches of the end of the Short Side string through the grommet at 10H, it won't even get blocked at all - thereby reducing blocked holes to a total of just 3.
  • Unlike some other ATW patterns, the UKRSA ATW pattern does not have a bottom cross installed early on, so there is no counting crosses (i.e. same weave as top cross for odd # of crosses, opposite weave as top cross for even # of crosses etc.) - thus no potential misweave.
  • Unlike some other ATW patterns, the UKRSA ATW pattern does not have a bottom cross installed early on, so there aren't any true "hard weaves". It has only 4 "semi hard weaves", all of which are at the periphery of the frame (the outer main on each side, top cross, and bottom cross).
  • Since there are only 2 knots (rather than 4) you will have no tension loss (drawback) on the outer mains, and only have a slight tension loss on the top and bottom cross (the last 2 strings before tying off).
  • Since there are only 2 knots (rather than 4) you will only need enough string, for the final pulls, to reach your tensioner TWICE, rather than 4 times. If you are using a set of string (rather than cutting from a reel) then this won't matter very much.
  • If you are cutting string from a reel, it will save you some string. It will require about 2 feet less string to do an ATW pattern versus a 2pc. job. This will depend on how much string is normally required for you to reach your tensioner. If you only need 1 foot to reach your tensioner (like my machine) then it will save you 2 feet. If you need 1.5 feet to reach your tensioner, then you'd save 3 feet of string. The last time I strung a PS 85 (at 60lbs with a very stretchy multifilament), I only needed 29 feet of string (just under 9m) using this ATW pattern.


If you've strung a few racquets before, and have a good sense of what you're doing, then I would recommend using the UKRSA Around The World pattern. It works very well on this particular frame.

A few questions of importance...
  1. Have you strung ANY other racquets yet, or are you trying to do your PS 6.0 85 as your very first string job? It may not be the easiest/best choice for one's very first frame.
  2. Exactly what kind of machine are you working with? Specifically, does your machine have fixed clamps or are you using floating/flying clamps? Regardless of whether you choose to do 2pc. or 1pc. ATW, things will be easier with fixed clamps - and trickier if you have floating/flying clamps.
  3. Exactly what type of string are you planning to use? Stiffer strings are easier to navigate past blocked holes than softer strings are.
  4. Assuming you do have a fixed clamp machine, does it have swivel clamps or glide bar clamps?
  5. Do you have a starting clamp or extra floating/flying clamp available?
  6. Are you cutting string from a reel, or using sets of string?
Incredible!!! Thanks for your response!!!!!
 

Karstic

Rookie
I remember reading instructions circa 1990 to begin stringing the crosses from the top before the last main string on the long side, doing that string last and tying off at the top. As I recall, this was to allow the bumper guard to be clamped down rather than due to any problem with stringing crosses from the bottom up. I just do two piece.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I remember reading instructions circa 1990 to begin stringing the crosses from the top before the last main string on the long side, doing that string last and tying off at the top. As I recall, this was to allow the bumper guard to be clamped down rather than due to any problem with stringing crosses from the bottom up. I just do two piece.
Sounds like the UKRSA ATW pattern, the pattern I gave was circa 1990 from USRSA Stringers Digest.

EDIT: I like the Liam Nolan UKRSA pattern but I would not recommend it for a beginning stringer. Too many difficult weaves.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I was just about to edit my post to note that. Pretty sure that was where I read it as well.
Wilson even in the early 80s recommended the universal ATW but I don’t have that old of a stringers digest any more. If you want to tie down the ends of the bumper you have to weave 2x to 4x to 3x to 5x, which wilson also suggested on hammers first then all their bumper rackets.
 
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