Stringing Theory

Ihatetennis

Hall of Fame
So we all know that yonex has a bigger sweet spot because of longer strings away from the center. Therefore allowing the zones outside the sweet spot to be more powerful.

What if we could recreate that in a normal racket.

My theory is that by stringing at lower tensions as you move further out the racket you will end up with a larger sweet spot.

I am not saying drastic changes in tension, but going from 55-53 over the course of 8 mains and 9 crosses.

Has anyone tried this?
 

jim e

Legend
It is called proportional stringing. been around for a long time, although no one practically does this.
 

chrisingrassia

Professional
Unless you're planning to tie off each individual main, how do you plan to ensure that each main keeps its tension and doesn't equalize over playing time through the whole stringbed?
 
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eelhc

Hall of Fame
It is called proportional stringing. been around for a long time, although no one practically does this.
Yep... Weed tennis calls it Live Periphery stringing on a crazy OS racquet with some variation.... and yes... no one does this.
 

Ihatetennis

Hall of Fame
Unless you're planning to tie off each individual main, how do you plan to ensure that each main keeps its tension and doesn't equalize over playing time through the whole stringbed?
Good to know it's been around.

I would tension outer knots more tightly to prevent tension loss at the tie off, and when it came around to cut the strings i noticed they were considerably tighter than the normal strings, the strings did not readjust in the frame.

of course it can move around a bit, but for the most part it seems like it could work since the first two mains won't really ever equalize with the last 2 mains.
 

Jerry Seinfeld

Professional
We make extensive use of proportional stringing so the statement that no one uses it is a myth. Properly installed, it is highly effective and we have multiple customers who benefit from it. In terms of strings equalizing over time, that is also a myth. The friction from grommets keeps them from equalizing. We have measured this using a stringmeter as well as using sharpie marks near grommets so that we could visually observe movement. The sharpie marks do reveal some movement over time, but it is limited. The stringmeter shows that the strings maintain the tension differential we use in the stringing process.

In terms of why we use it, there are two main reasons. The first is to lessen the shock on off-center hits. Proportional stringing effectively achieves this making it an effective technique to help with customers who play with stiff frames and are having arm issues. The second is to liven up the stringbed for customers who are seeking a little more life from their racquet/string setup while still maintaining control. We use proportional stringing almost exclusively with synthetic strings, (solid core and multis), and natural gut. It is not a technique we currently use with poly setups.
 

scotus

G.O.A.T.
We make extensive use of proportional stringing so the statement that no one uses it is a myth. Properly installed, it is highly effective and we have multiple customers who benefit from it. In terms of strings equalizing over time, that is also a myth. The friction from grommets keeps them from equalizing. We have measured this using a stringmeter as well as using sharpie marks near grommets so that we could visually observe movement. The sharpie marks do reveal some movement over time, but it is limited. The stringmeter shows that the strings maintain the tension differential we use in the stringing process.
Fully agreed.
 

chrisingrassia

Professional
I just love the concept of a customer coming to me with directions that they want 24 different tensions for their crosses and mains. This sounds like some experiment that gets stirred up on the internet without any actual science behind it. Can anyone prove any of this other than blogs? I've never seen or heard of someone actually doing this, nor a pro undertaking a practice like this. Sounds like something proprietary that a club would do for their member(s) to ensure future stringing revenues.

"Good lord, this felt terrible!!! I think I need to change my 3rd to last main to 51# instead of 53#, my second to last main to 49.5# instead of 51#, my outside mains to 48# instead of 50#, and let's increase the top half of my crosses by 1# and decrease the bottom half by 2#.

That should do the trick!"
 
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PBODY99

Legend
I just love the concept of a customer coming to me with directions that they want 24 different tensions for their crosses and mains. This sounds like some experiment that gets stirred up on the internet without any actual science behind it. Can anyone prove any of this other than blogs? I've never seen or heard of someone actually doing this, nor a pro undertaking a practice like this. Sounds like something proprietary that a club would do for their member(s) to ensure future stringing revenues.
"Good lord, this felt terrible!!! I think I need to change my 3rd to last main to 51# instead of 53#, my second to last main to 49.5# instead of 51#, my outside mains to 48# instead of 50#, and let's increase the top half of my crosses by 1# and decrease the bottom half by 2#.

That should do the trick!"
When L. Davenport was playing she briefly endorsed a product that helped with this . The name escapes me, but the small circular dots of emery paper were to be inserted into the string channel at the bends., increasing the friction.
I installed this in a couple of frames for a player who is a big fan of hers. Using Gosen JC 1.30 in a pair of my personal frames,one with,the other without the product both stung proportionally, I noticed no difference between the two.
Since, I charged extra for the labor and on seeing what you got for the cost of the "aid", which could be made using ultra fine sanding paper, it lasted one season on the market.
 
It is called proportional stringing. been around for a long time, although no one practically does this.
Yep... Weed tennis calls it Live Periphery stringing on a crazy OS racquet with some variation.... and yes... no one does this.
Not really. Proportional Stringing is very rare and there are very few people willing to spend the time to do it. I've been doing a lot of proportional stringing for a few years now.

Most (90+%) of those who tried it absolutely LOVED it. They kept asking for it even though it may be a longer wait than straight-up stringing.

We make extensive use of proportional stringing so the statement that no one uses it is a myth. Properly installed, it is highly effective and we have multiple customers who benefit from it. In terms of strings equalizing over time, that is also a myth. The friction from grommets keeps them from equalizing. We have measured this using a stringmeter as well as using sharpie marks near grommets so that we could visually observe movement. The sharpie marks do reveal some movement over time, but it is limited. The stringmeter shows that the strings maintain the tension differential we use in the stringing process.

In terms of why we use it, there are two main reasons. The first is to lessen the shock on off-center hits. Proportional stringing effectively achieves this making it an effective technique to help with customers who play with stiff frames and are having arm issues. The second is to liven up the stringbed for customers who are seeking a little more life from their racquet/string setup while still maintaining control. We use proportional stringing almost exclusively with synthetic strings, (solid core and multis), and natural gut. It is not a technique we currently use with poly setups.
I fully agree with Jerry above. I have tried proportional stringing successfully with full poly. If you are curious, please take a look at this post in my blog:
http://unorthodoxstringing.blogspot.sg/2015/07/proportional-stringing-using-full-poly.html
http://unorthodoxstringing.blogspot.sg/2015/07/proportional-stringing-using-full-poly.html
However, do note that there are many more measurements needed with full poly than with other strings. Much more time and care is needed to preserve the hoop shape and apply the tension accurately too. I have many advanced players (ntrp 4.0+++) competing using proportional stringing exclusively now.
 
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