Strings losing tension/breaking too quickly.

krprunitennis2

Professional
I've just started stringing a few weeks ago, and I am using an Eagnas 300 that I got from my friend.

When I get my racket strung at a place like Racket Doctor or some racket store, my strings usually last me around 3 weeks. However, when I strung my racket, it only lasted me 2 weeks, and now I'm thinking that it's going to break after merely one week. I AM hitting harder just because I want to, but I don't think that hitting harder/with more spin would make that much of a difference.

In addition, I've strung a couple of my friends' rackets and it seems that the tension goes down much faster when I string it as opposed to other people stringing it.

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So background information aside, are there any bad stringing habits that cause strings to break faster/lose tension quicker? I've looked at some videos and comments and one that caught my attention was that if you hastily pull on the crosses as you weave them, you cause friction and make the mains weaker. Or, is it that the Eagnas 300 is just old? A day after I string rackets, the tension still seems nice and tight, but after a few days or so, it's horrible. Any ideas on what I'm doing wrong?
 

dancraig

Hall of Fame
I think I strung over 1000 racquets on a 300, the machine's design isn't the problem.
Strings seem to be breaking sooner, there are a couple of things to check for. Be sure you're not kinking the string as you work. This can cause a weak spot. As you mentioned, pulling the crosses through without 'fanning' them can cause notching. I suppose extreme notching could cause premature breaking.
Tension seems too loose, several things to check. Make sure your clamps and gripper are clean and properly adjusted. If they are letting the string slip, it will be looser. Make sure you are clamping close to racquet. Make sure you aren't losing tension on your tie off knots, this is a frequent issue with people new to stringing. Also, check the calibration on the tensioner.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Could be you are using different strings. Crank (or lockout) machine usually string a racket is little lower than constant pull machines do and you may want to raise the tension just a little. Also the strings could be breaking because of your technique.

Irvin
 
Without seeing you string, my thoughts as to why would be as follows:
1. You aren't straightening the crosses as you string. This will lead to the stringbed loosening.
2. You're cranking way too fast, not giving the crosses time to overcome some of the friction.
3. Are you pulling 2 mains at a time?
4. Your machine may need calibrated.
5. The previous stringer used a constant pull machine.
 
Hey OP, if you need some advice on how to string and stuff..I don't think we live too far apart. Lemme know..I can take a look at your stringjob and let you know what you need to watch out for..etc..

But to answer some of your questions, it could be the string you are using, the clamps clamping too tight, the machine not calibrated, the clamps slipping, etc etc
 

krprunitennis2

Professional
I think I strung over 1000 racquets on a 300, the machine's design isn't the problem.
Strings seem to be breaking sooner, there are a couple of things to check for. Be sure you're not kinking the string as you work. This can cause a weak spot. As you mentioned, pulling the crosses through without 'fanning' them can cause notching. I suppose extreme notching could cause premature breaking.
Tension seems too loose, several things to check. Make sure your clamps and gripper are clean and properly adjusted. If they are letting the string slip, it will be looser. Make sure you are clamping close to racquet. Make sure you aren't losing tension on your tie off knots, this is a frequent issue with people new to stringing. Also, check the calibration on the tensioner.
I'm guessing that 'kinking the string' happens when there is a loop and i just pull on the string, causing some unnatural twisting? How do you 'fan' the crosses?

Without seeing you string, my thoughts as to why would be as follows:
1. You aren't straightening the crosses as you string. This will lead to the stringbed loosening.
2. You're cranking way too fast, not giving the crosses time to overcome some of the friction.
3. Are you pulling 2 mains at a time?
4. Your machine may need calibrated.
5. The previous stringer used a constant pull machine.
I'm guessing that cranking is just pulling the string after it's been weaved through the mains. Is that correct? I pull one main through it's corresponding holes, tension it, and clamp it. Repeat. Is it recommended to string more than one main at a time? I saw videos on youtube called 'speed stringing' where they tension multiple mains at one time.

Thanks for the replies, all of you. It'll make me feel better once I actually save money by having the strings and the tension last longer. Haha
 

dancraig

Hall of Fame
I'm guessing that 'kinking the string' happens when there is a loop and i just pull on the string, causing some unnatural twisting? How do you 'fan' the crosses?



I'm guessing that cranking is just pulling the string after it's been weaved through the mains. Is that correct? I pull one main through it's corresponding holes, tension it, and clamp it. Repeat. Is it recommended to string more than one main at a time? I saw videos on youtube called 'speed stringing' where they tension multiple mains at one time.

Thanks for the replies, all of you. It'll make me feel better once I actually save money by having the strings and the tension last longer. Haha
Kinking is when you pull on a little twist in the string.
Fanning is pulling the crosses down as you pull them through. I think you can find a video of it online. It is basically "not" pulling the crosses straight across the mains as you pull the string through the mains. So that the friction of the crosses against the mains is not all in one spot, but spread out over a larger area.
 
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