Stringway Dropweight vs Wise?

am1899

Hall of Fame
@Dags I like it!

Here’s yet another one to consider:

If you were buying a sports car, would you want an automatic transmission or a manual? Why?
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?members/772964/

Question can be: If only selling is our major object why do we keep doing it differently from all the others 23 years long?

Or: Do all the others just go with the (Babolat) flow?
Question can also be:

Is Stringway solving real problems, or are they just trying to be different so they can can continue to claim omniscience?

It’s pretty obvious that part of the reason Stringway keeps doing it differently is so that you and others can continue to claim that your competitors are doing it wrong, and that anyone who doubts you or doesn’t adopt your opinion is stupid.

Not a great business strategy if you ask me. Which is a shame, because I really do think Stringway manufactures a solid product.
 
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Dags

Hall of Fame
@am1899 - I'm going to be difficult here, because I like the idea of a semi-automatic with the flappy paddle gearbox. Convenience and precision control. ;)

It's an interesting question based on location though. Here in the UK, although the sales of automatic cars are increasing with the advent of electric cars (I assume that's a weight thing to help with efficiency?), manual transmissions are still the norm across the board. I have only ever driven manuals. And only ever right hand drive. I might plump for an automatic over your side of the pond to save myself from trying to change gear and sticking my hand out the window.

Which way would you go?
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
@am1899 - I'm going to be difficult here, because I like the idea of a semi-automatic with the flappy paddle gearbox. Convenience and precision control. ;)

It's an interesting question based on location though. Here in the UK, although the sales of automatic cars are increasing with the advent of electric cars (I assume that's a weight thing to help with efficiency?), manual transmissions are still the norm across the board. I have only ever driven manuals. And only ever right hand drive. I might plump for an automatic over your side of the pond to save myself from trying to change gear and sticking my hand out the window.

Which way would you go?
In the US manuals are obviously very much in the minority. Some sports cars aren’t even offered in a manual. For me that’s a deal breaker.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
Power or manual steering? My first car, an Audi had manual steering and transmission. Best feel for the road ever IMHO. Original RX-7 may be close
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
I've been thinking about the car analogy and some of the comments you've made in this thread. Possibly a more apt comparison would be a modern car versus a vintage model: the modern vehicle is unquestionably efficient and comfortable, but for the enthusiast, there's a pleasure to be gained from occasionally driving a car where you have to double de-clutch.

As far as stringing is concerned, most of the skill comes in areas that are common at all machines, whether it be selecting the appropriate stringing pattern or weaving your crosses. The tension heads work in fundamentally the same way: feed string into a gripper and press a button/turn a handle/drop a bar. Should you choose a Stringway with the 'automatic' dropweight, then my understanding is that it removes the 'skill' of levelling the bar (which is no bad thing, unless you were looking for a real back-to-basics approach). There's certainly a romantic notion in your mind, but I don't think that the automatic dropweight will give an additional sense of fulfilment over a Wise. I've never used one mind, so perhaps I'm wrong.

Whilst not a direct comparison, I previously stated that I find stringing much more enjoyable with a Wise than the crank it replaced. That comes down to a couple of things: I find myself moving less, which is important on days of multiple racquets, and it allows me to work with both hands on the stringbed whilst tension is being pulled. That is where some of the craft you mention can be found. Personally, I prefer a machine that can help me achieve that, rather than one where I may arrive at the same results but in spite of the machine.
Thank you @Dags for taking the time to ponder this further and I agree that the modern vs vintage analogy might be more apt (y)

In my mind I am seeing the mechanical movement of a Swiss watch compared to the undoubted accuracy of a quartz watch. They both have the potential to tell the time accurately but the former requires a little more care and attention. Putting the perceived status of expensive watches to one side, some people are drawn to the mechanical movement whilst others will opt for the quartz every time.
At the end of the day, both will get the job done and it's a matter of personal preference. Same for tension heads, as you say.

I am leaning towards the Stringway for the following reasons;
  • The constant-pull of the auto drop-weight without the potential frustration of having to get the bar exactly level (as per a regular drop-weight). As you rightly mention.
  • The quality of their clamps - which most people seem to agree upon.
  • Their general build quality and durability - which most owners seem to agree upon.
  • Using the car analogy again, it might be better to learn how to drive in a manual to start with. I can always switch to a more automatic solution down the line if I feel the need (and note the insightful comments in your final paragraph). Like most people here in the UK I learned to drive in a manual and think that's the best way. I now drive an automatic and don't see myself going back. Having said that, every now and then I need to drive a manual for some reason and can switch without hesitation.
  • Very little can go wrong with it.
  • The opportunity to compare and contrast results with my friend's Gefen/Wise combo.
  • I can set up outside at a tennis tournament or event and string for anyone without worrying about the nearest plug socket. When I've learnt what I'm doing of course!
  • If I don't get on with it for any reason, it should be fairly easy to sell.
 

struggle

Legend
Show me a single tournament stringer/"pro" stringer that uses a stringway.

Just one.

And then when you do such, please give me a testimonial as to why.

I'm not gonna say the machine doesn't work, i'm sure it does. What i'd ask is
WHY one would do so. It makes little sense.

In the car analogy, there are too many comparisons to list. Not really a valid comparison.
 
Thank you @Dags for taking the time to ponder this further and I agree that the modern vs vintage analogy might be more apt (y)

In my mind I am seeing the mechanical movement of a Swiss watch compared to the undoubted accuracy of a quartz watch. They both have the potential to tell the time accurately but the former requires a little more care and attention. Putting the perceived status of expensive watches to one side, some people are drawn to the mechanical movement whilst others will opt for the quartz every time.
At the end of the day, both will get the job done and it's a matter of personal preference. Same for tension heads, as you say.

I am leaning towards the Stringway for the following reasons;
  • The constant-pull of the auto drop-weight without the potential frustration of having to get the bar exactly level (as per a regular drop-weight). As you rightly mention.
  • The quality of their clamps - which most people seem to agree upon.
  • Their general build quality and durability - which most owners seem to agree upon.
  • Using the car analogy again, it might be better to learn how to drive in a manual to start with. I can always switch to a more automatic solution down the line if I feel the need (and note the insightful comments in your final paragraph). Like most people here in the UK I learned to drive in a manual and think that's the best way. I now drive an automatic and don't see myself going back. Having said that, every now and then I need to drive a manual for some reason and can switch without hesitation.
  • Very little can go wrong with it.
  • The opportunity to compare and contrast results with my friend's Gefen/Wise combo.
  • I can set up outside at a tennis tournament or event and string for anyone without worrying about the nearest plug socket. When I've learnt what I'm doing of course!
  • If I don't get on with it for any reason, it should be fairly easy to sell.
If you want this to lead anywhere, I’d suggest taking some of the input, going back to the start and pick one.

The debate about what tournament stringers use is correct but irrelevant, because that’s not you (unless you plan to go to tournaments and need to crank out 20 minute string jobs one after another, for days).

And most of the comparisons lean strongly in the direction of the point someone is trying to prove anyway. They describe something modern vs something antiquated and I don’t think that’s correct.

SW has a different approach for sure. We can frame that by listing failed ideas (i.e. Rotary engine), but you could also list long run successes (electrical cars). I personally think both of these are too simple. SW has a different approach, that appeals to some of us and SW seem happy to operate in that niche.
 
It’s pretty obvious that part of the reason Stringway keeps doing it differently is so that you and others can continue to claim that your competitors are doing it wrong, and that anyone who doubts you or doesn’t adopt your opinion is stupid.
SW has a different approach for sure. We can frame that by listing failed ideas (i.e. Rotary engine), but you could also list long run successes (electrical cars). I personally think both of these are too simple. SW has a different approach, that appeals to some of us and SW seem happy to operate in that niche.
I wanted to stay out of this discussion because the opinion of users is asked for.

But our reason to continue the inside direct racquet support is so different from the assumptions that I would like to explain:

The major difference between us and other machine manufacturers is that we are development engineers and we develop based on a theory and calculations and not on what the user sees during use.

The outside support (6 point) is created because stringers noticed that the width of the racquet increases during stringing the main strings.

Our philosophy was: “If the racquet does not get shorter it does not get wider also”. So create a solid racquet support which works directly against the forces of the main strings.

In 1992 we wanted to develop a new racquet support.

So I asked my colleague on the Dutch Nuclear Research Centre if he could make a computer calculation which showed the stress in the racquet for every type of racquet support.
The calculation was made for the head side of a 110 sq in racquet because the throat side is much stronger.

This graph shows the best position of the supports for 3 options





The conclusions can be:
- A 3-point direct support with inside supports on 52 mm from the centre offers the best results.
- A 2-point direct support (like Ektelon) offers quite good support.
- With outside supports the stress in the racquet depends strongly on the position of the supports. For 110 sqin the best position is at 175, the smaller the racquet head the smaller the distance.

Based on this theory we designed our 5 point direct racquet support “O92” with 3 wide supports at the head side and 2 height-adjustable supports on the throat side.

Apart from the position of the supports it is important that they are very wide so that the pressure between the racquet and the support is low.



So we stay with our system because we are very convinced that our system offers the best possible protection for the racquet during stringing.

The fact that we never get any kind of complaints about damaged racquets proves in our opinion that our philosophy is not too bad.

Thanks
Fred
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
Show me a single tournament stringer/"pro" stringer that uses a stringway.

Just one.

And then when you do such, please give me a testimonial as to why.

I'm not gonna say the machine doesn't work, i'm sure it does. What i'd ask is
WHY one would do so. It makes little sense.

In the car analogy, there are too many comparisons to list. Not really a valid comparison.
That's a fair question @struggle given the way this thread has developed.
My understanding from what I have seen and read is that high-end electronic machines are the established gold standard for professional stringers - both at higher level tournaments and in busy pro shops.
A combination of volume/speed, stringer comfort and player/customer perception will require it.
There might be some highly respected exceptions and arguments for alternatives but I wasn't seeking to trigger any debate on the gold standard for high level professionals in this thread.
My purpose was to understand the differences in the stringing experience between a Stringway and a crank with a Wise upgrade for someone starting out who might progress to doing a few rackets a day in the coming years.
I am grateful for the many insightful and helpful comments that have been made and respect the passions of those with differing views and preferences.
There are clearly various effective ways to skin the same cat.
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
If you want this to lead anywhere, I’d suggest taking some of the input, going back to the start and pick one.

The debate about what tournament stringers use is correct but irrelevant, because that’s not you (unless you plan to go to tournaments and need to crank out 20 minute string jobs one after another, for days).

And most of the comparisons lean strongly in the direction of the point someone is trying to prove anyway. They describe something modern vs something antiquated and I don’t think that’s correct.

SW has a different approach for sure. We can frame that by listing failed ideas (i.e. Rotary engine), but you could also list long run successes (electrical cars). I personally think both of these are too simple. SW has a different approach, that appeals to some of us and SW seem happy to operate in that niche.
I agree with you @PaddyDutch
In most sectors and markets there are competing brands, manufacturers and service providers offering their version of the optimal solution.
Consumers need to weigh up the pros and cons of each and figure out which option is best for their particular circumstances.
As a result of this thread (and the reading I did on this forum before posting it) I know a lot more than I did (y)
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
I wanted to stay out of this discussion because the opinion of users is asked for.

But our reason to continue the inside direct racquet support is so different from the assumptions that I would like to explain:

The major difference between us and other machine manufacturers is that we are development engineers and we develop based on a theory and calculations and not on what the user sees during use.

The outside support (6 point) is created because stringers noticed that the width of the racquet increases during stringing the main strings.

Our philosophy was: “If the racquet does not get shorter it does not get wider also”. So create a solid racquet support which works directly against the forces of the main strings.

In 1992 we wanted to develop a new racquet support.

So I asked my colleague on the Dutch Nuclear Research Centre if he could make a computer calculation which showed the stress in the racquet for every type of racquet support.
The calculation was made for the head side of a 110 sq in racquet because the throat side is much stronger.

This graph shows the best position of the supports for 3 options





The conclusions can be:
- A 3-point direct support with inside supports on 52 mm from the centre offers the best results.
- A 2-point direct support (like Ektelon) offers quite good support.
- With outside supports the stress in the racquet depends strongly on the position of the supports. For 110 sqin the best position is at 175, the smaller the racquet head the smaller the distance.

Based on this theory we designed our 5 point direct racquet support “O92” with 3 wide supports at the head side and 2 height-adjustable supports on the throat side.

Apart from the position of the supports it is important that they are very wide so that the pressure between the racquet and the support is low.



So we stay with our system because we are very convinced that our system offers the best possible protection for the racquet during stringing.

The fact that we never get any kind of complaints about damaged racquets proves in our opinion that our philosophy is not too bad.

Thanks
Fred
Actually this is one of the additional points of difference that appealed to me in my research @Stringway Official
I have also weighed the counter argument of those that say they have never damaged a racket with a six point racket support system.
Personally I find the constant pull of the auto drop-weight and quality of the clamps more compelling factors in my decision making process. The inside support system is more of an additional positive than a deal clincher for me.
 

beepee1972

Semi-Pro
Funny how the original question has been left untouched for at least a full page of reactions......

To the OP: I only have personal experiences with a Stringway, which I happily used for about 6 years without a fault. Not the Gefen, never heard of it.

I now have a Tecnifibre Ergo One, so can't really compare rightfully, since there is so much difference in price here. Reason for me to switch was.... well..... just me, and rationally can't be justified ;-)

So as you have noticed, there are advocates and opponents (of Stringway), just read between the lines and pick those criteria that matter to you! Good luck in choosing.
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
Funny how the original question has been left untouched for at least a full page of reactions......

To the OP: I only have personal experiences with a Stringway, which I happily used for about 6 years without a fault. Not the Gefen, never heard of it.

I now have a Tecnifibre Ergo One, so can't really compare rightfully, since there is so much difference in price here. Reason for me to switch was.... well..... just me, and rationally can't be justified ;-)

So as you have noticed, there are advocates and opponents (of Stringway), just read between the lines and pick those criteria that matter to you! Good luck in choosing.
Thank you @beepee1972
May I ask which Stringway model you used to have?
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
I have had two, the ML100 tabletop model with flying clamps. And the ML120 with fixed T92 clamps.
Did you prefer the fixed clamps @beepee1972 ?
Were there any benefits of the flying clamps that you missed?
And lastly, did you prefer the stand version to the tabletop?
I see that you can order a stand for the ML100 now and was thinking that might be the most versatile solution?
 
Did you prefer the fixed clamps @beepee1972 ?
Were there any benefits of the flying clamps that you missed?
And lastly, did you prefer the stand version to the tabletop?
I see that you can order a stand for the ML100 now and was thinking that might be the most versatile solution?
If I can chip in too: I have an ML 90. It’s a table top and I prefer that because it allows me to store it wherever and use the machine in the kitchen.

with regards to clamps: I started with flying but the fixed are soooo much nicer to use. Mine are the T98’s, which are less nice than the current 92’s, but like every other detail about the machine they are just simple and solid.
 

beepee1972

Semi-Pro
Did you prefer the fixed clamps @beepee1972 ?
Were there any benefits of the flying clamps that you missed?
And lastly, did you prefer the stand version to the tabletop?
I see that you can order a stand for the ML100 now and was thinking that might be the most versatile solution?
There was not really a preference for clamp type. Both work great, flying clamps are a bit more flexible, clamping strings with the fixed clamps can cost a bit more time, because you really need to position the clamp correctly below the string. Disadvantage of flying clamps is you need to find a place to put them down, when not in use.
I liked the stand, because I have a reserved place in my stringing room. Also when on the go (tournaments), I like the stand better, because you are not dependent on the height of available tables. Be aware though, the stand has a fixed height!
I used to string downstairs, simply on the dining room table in the earlier days.... with the table top version . So if you need to be flexible... choose a table top. After stringing I would put it in the garage.
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
If I can chip in too: I have an ML 90. It’s a table top and I prefer that because it allows me to store it wherever and use the machine in the kitchen.

with regards to clamps: I started with flying but the fixed are soooo much nicer to use. Mine are the T98’s, which are less nice than the current 92’s, but like every other detail about the machine they are just simple and solid.
Thank you for your insight @PaddyDutch
Is there any disadvantage to stringing on a tabletop? For example, if the machine is on a table, are you able to string efficiently from one side? Or is it better to be able to walk around the machine?
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
There was not really a preference for clamp type. Both work great, flying clamps are a bit more flexible, clamping strings with the fixed clamps can cost a bit more time, because you really need to position the clamp correctly below the string. Disadvantage of flying clamps is you need to find a place to put them down, when not in use.
I liked the stand, because I have a reserved place in my stringing room. Also when on the go (tournaments), I like the stand better, because you are not dependent on the height of available tables. Be aware though, the stand has a fixed height!
I used to string downstairs, simply on the dining room table in the earlier days.... with the table top version . So if you need to be flexible... choose a table top. After stringing I would put it in the garage.
Thank you for your insight @beepee1972
I am fairly tall at 6'4". Do you think the stand would be high enough for me to use comfortably?
Also, as I just asked @PaddyDutch , is there any disadvantage to stringing on a tabletop? For example, if the machine is on a table, are you able to string efficiently from one side? Or is it better to be able to walk around the machine?
 

struggle

Legend
Thank you for your insight @beepee1972
I am fairly tall at 6'4". Do you think the stand would be high enough for me to use comfortably?
Also, as I just asked @PaddyDutch , is there any disadvantage to stringing on a tabletop? For example, if the machine is on a table, are you able to string efficiently from one side? Or is it better to be able to walk around the machine?
I'd say most folks likely stand in one position. I know i do as i tension with the same (right) hand every time.
I'd say in that regard a table top it is fine. A bigger issue will be a comfortable height, I like to have the stringbed
at a height where it is roughly where my elbows are bent at 90 degrees when threading/weaving etc.
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
I'd say most folks likely stand in one position. I know i do as i tension with the same (right) hand every time.
I'd say in that regard a table top it is fine. A bigger issue will be a comfortable height, I like to have the stringbed
at a height where it is roughly where my elbows are bent at 90 degrees when threading/weaving etc.
That's really helpful @struggle
I have an electric sit/stand desk at home - which enables me to adjust the height at the push of a button.
I just adjusted it to 110cm = the stringbed height with the stand (as advised by Stringway).
That's approximately 8cm too low for my elbows to be bent at 90 degrees.
That might be workable but if I can work efficiently from one side as you say, my sit/stand desk might be the ideal solution (with it's incremental height adjustment).
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
@beepee1972 - maybe you could offer a comment on which machine you enjoy stringing on the most, the Stringway series or the beautiful, sleek Ergo One ;). Seriously, do you consider the standard electric CP a step up or a lateral move? Which do you think renders the best, most consistent output, ease of use?
 
Thank you for your insight @PaddyDutch
Is there any disadvantage to stringing on a tabletop? For example, if the machine is on a table, are you able to string efficiently from one side? Or is it better to be able to walk around the machine?
I’m a bit taller than average, so I need to have it pretty high up. My preferred spot is the kitchen worktop, the perfect height and near to snacks. I never have the urge to walk around the machine and think few people do that. I guess you get used to operating the crank or dropweight with left or right, so you’ll lean towards staying to one side or the other.

I had an old machine fixed to a stand. That was in the attic, so not ideal. The SW tabletop is quite heavy, but it is no problem carrying it in and out of the kitchen.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
I wanted to stay out of this discussion because the opinion of users is asked for.
And yet, here you are. :)

The major difference between us and other machine manufacturers is that we are development engineers and we develop based on a theory and calculations and not on what the user sees during use.
I can’t think of a better quote to illustrate my point:

It’s pretty obvious that part of the reason Stringway keeps doing it differently is so that you and others can continue to claim that your competitors are doing it wrong, and that anyone who doubts you or doesn’t adopt your opinion is stupid.

So we stay with our system because we are very convinced that our system offers the best possible protection for the racquet during stringing.
Fine, no argument here.

The fact that we never get any kind of complaints about damaged racquets proves in our opinion that our philosophy is not too bad.
I don’t contend that your philosophy is “bad.” What I take issue with (again) is your implication that your competitors’ philosophy is lacking in some way.

Maybe others are impressed by diagrams from your Nuclear scientist friend and convinced by your conclusions.

Personally, that this was a problem to solve in the first place is belied by the lack of a pile of broken racquets in the wake of machines without your mounting system. I don’t need Einstein to help me figure that out.
 

struggle

Legend
^^^^^^^^

Yes, i have never seen an issue with normal "2" or "6" point mounting systems, nor have i ever heard of such.

This isn't F1 racing.

Still, the SW DW system is a great idea, just wish they would incorporate it into a normal, perfectly functional,
commonly accepted (by the best in the industry) mounting system with a commonly accepted clamping system as well.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
I’m a bit taller than average, so I need to have it pretty high up. My preferred spot is the kitchen worktop, the perfect height and near to snacks. I never have the urge to walk around the machine and think few people do that. I guess you get used to operating the crank or dropweight with left or right, so you’ll lean towards staying to one side or the other.

I had an old machine fixed to a stand. That was in the attic, so not ideal. The SW tabletop is quite heavy, but it is no problem carrying it in and out of the kitchen.
Kitchen is a forbidden term on this board
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
^^^^^^^^

Yes, i have never seen an issue with normal "2" or "6" point mounting systems, nor have i ever heard of such.

This isn't F1 racing.

Still, the SW DW system is a great idea, just wish they would incorporate it into a normal, perfectly functional,
commonly accepted (by the best in the industry) mounting system with a commonly accepted clamping system as well.
Laserfibre kinda met your requirements BITD
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
I’m a bit taller than average, so I need to have it pretty high up. My preferred spot is the kitchen worktop, the perfect height and near to snacks. I never have the urge to walk around the machine and think few people do that. I guess you get used to operating the crank or dropweight with left or right, so you’ll lean towards staying to one side or the other.

I had an old machine fixed to a stand. That was in the attic, so not ideal. The SW tabletop is quite heavy, but it is no problem carrying it in and out of the kitchen.
Thanks @PaddyDutch
In addition to the machine with its fixed clamps, would you recommend any other particular tools/kit? In addition to the snacks of course ;-)
 

WYK

Hall of Fame
^^^^^^^^

Yes, i have never seen an issue with normal "2" or "6" point mounting systems, nor have i ever heard of such.

This isn't F1 racing.

Still, the SW DW system is a great idea, just wish they would incorporate it into a normal, perfectly functional,
commonly accepted (by the best in the industry) mounting system with a commonly accepted clamping system as well.
I was very close to purchasing a Stringway. Even had a couple of emails back and forth. Very helpful and professional in emails.
In the end, I just couldn't bring myself to own such a strange device.
It's like the SAAB of stringing machines. :(
 

Wes

Professional
My preferred spot is the kitchen worktop, the perfect height and near to snacks.
"near to snacks"!
:laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing:

This isn't F1 racing.
Wait... what? It isn't??? :unsure:

Still, the SW DW system is a great idea, just wish they would incorporate it into a normal, perfectly functional,
commonly accepted (by the best in the industry) mounting system with a commonly accepted clamping system as well.
Plasma cutter + welding = solution. :p

I was very close to purchasing a Stringway.
I just couldn't bring myself to own such a strange device.
It's like the SAAB of stringing machines. :(
If a Stringway is the SAAB... then what does that make the MiStringer? :whistle:
 
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Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I have the wise with a gamma machine. The Wise has been a tank. I do all kind of wrong things to abuse it, from stringing EVERY racquet at 86/86lbs and pulling on the mains while they are being tensioned, etc. It has just worked with no issues. Its worse too. I never oiled it properly, just placing the oil that I had on hand, like olive oil, etc. Never cleaned it or the gamma. I know, "lock him up". Only issue is that one day the ball bearings on the gripper just stopped moving because of the bad oil and not cleaning. So I took it apart and cleaned it properly and reoiled it. Works great. Though recently the led is not fully lit so 86 looks like 66 these days. Thats it in more than 6 years of abuse. Total tank for me.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
Regarding accessibility around the machine, I've always thought that perhaps the most comparable activity is ironing. The majority of us will do it standing, and there will be a few steps here and there but for the most part you're in more or less the same spot.

Considerations if you get a table top: size and weight. Machines are somewhat portable, but truth is, they're pretty heavy. Mine lives (on a stand) in the corner of the room, and is moved when it's in use. Weight alone would make me think twice about trying to store it in a cupboard, and the footprint is larger than you might imagine, so do check dimensions if that's the plan.

Practicality of the desk: size and weight of the machine as above. On top of this, you need to consider the dimensions of the racquet. The racquet needs to turn, which means that the handle will protrude from the sides of the machine as you rotate the turntable (if that makes no sense, pick any video). The note here is basically - if the desk is positioned by a wall, it's not quite as straight forward as just whether the machine would fit on it.
 

beepee1972

Semi-Pro
@beepee1972 - maybe you could offer a comment on which machine you enjoy stringing on the most, the Stringway series or the beautiful, sleek Ergo One ;). Seriously, do you consider the standard electric CP a step up or a lateral move? Which do you think renders the best, most consistent output, ease of use?
like I said before, price wise you cannot compare. So You already know the answers to your questions Let me say, I have no regrets. But be aware the difference in price is about €4500,- to put things a bit more in perspective....

I must say though, the comments about the mounting system seem quite strange to me, there is absolutely nothing wrong with the Stringway mounting system. I wasn’t used to anything else and never found it awkward or ineffecient. The TF machine also uses a different approach then let’s say a Babolat....
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
Regarding accessibility around the machine, I've always thought that perhaps the most comparable activity is ironing. The majority of us will do it standing, and there will be a few steps here and there but for the most part you're in more or less the same spot.

Considerations if you get a table top: size and weight. Machines are somewhat portable, but truth is, they're pretty heavy. Mine lives (on a stand) in the corner of the room, and is moved when it's in use. Weight alone would make me think twice about trying to store it in a cupboard, and the footprint is larger than you might imagine, so do check dimensions if that's the plan.

Practicality of the desk: size and weight of the machine as above. On top of this, you need to consider the dimensions of the racquet. The racquet needs to turn, which means that the handle will protrude from the sides of the machine as you rotate the turntable (if that makes no sense, pick any video). The note here is basically - if the desk is positioned by a wall, it's not quite as straight forward as just whether the machine would fit on it.
That's really helpful insight @Dags Thank you (y)
 

PlayBrave

Rookie
like I said before, price wise you cannot compare. So You already know the answers to your questions Let me say, I have no regrets. But be aware the difference in price is about €4500,- to put things a bit more in perspective....

I must say though, the comments about the mounting system seem quite strange to me, there is absolutely nothing wrong with the Stringway mounting system. I wasn’t used to anything else and never found it awkward or ineffecient. The TF machine also uses a different approach then let’s say a Babolat....
Thank you for your balanced reply @beepee1972
As a matter of interest, how do the Stringway clamps compare to the TF?
I know the Stringway clamps are highly regarded and wonder if the TF are a significant level up?
 

Folsom_Stringer_Musa

Professional
In the end, I just couldn't bring myself to own such a strange device.
There are even stranger things out there. Can't wait to see next evolution in stringing machine.
If someone has one of this strapped around the shoulder, people might think different object.
 
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beepee1972

Semi-Pro
Thank you for your balanced reply @beepee1972
As a matter of interest, how do the Stringway clamps compare to the TF?
I know the Stringway clamps are highly regarded and wonder if the TF are a significant level up?
There you have it, this is without a doubt true. I even think the TF clamps are easier and better than a lot of the other clamps. There is no comparison in how they glide over the table, yet still are solid as a rock when clamped. This, together with the fact that there is no lever anymore, were the main reasons for me to switch. And it is adjustable in height, also a nice advantage.
 

kkm

Hall of Fame
Question can also be:

Is Stringway solving real problems, or are they just trying to be different so they can can continue to claim omniscience?

It’s pretty obvious that part of the reason Stringway keeps doing it differently is so that you and others can continue to claim that your competitors are doing it wrong, and that anyone who doubts you or doesn’t adopt your opinion is stupid.

Not a great business strategy if you ask me. Which is a shame, because I really do think Stringway manufactures a solid product.
A guy I know bought a brand new ML100, and the part with the arrow pointing to it in the pic below broke in two without warning:

 

kkm

Hall of Fame
@kkm yikes! That sounds and looks like a it would have been a nightmare.
So much for Stringway's direct support system and those comical fear-provoking diagrams Technatic posts showing what epic failures other manufacturers' support systems are! :rolleyes::sneaky::laughing::-D

That large piece that broke on the ML100 was made out of some hard plasticky material.

Technatic and Jaycee seem to have converted a bunch of people, preying on their insecurities by basically insulting them and the stringing machines they use - saying stuff along the lines of "...the crank machines preferred by American stringers." People underestimate the power of those methods.
Thank goodness that there are people on these boards who can describe what actually happens on a molecular level, and not just parrot that anything other than Stringway "kills" polyester strings.
 
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marco forehand

Semi-Pro
So I guess I need to admit that I am one of the brain washed, insecure stringers who has had my free will taken from me (via dental implants! )
Once I enjoyed stringing. Then I feel under the evil influence of Technatic (also known as Sauron) and his wraith Jaycee.

I like Stringway products. I have had the chance to own and use for an extended period 3 different stringing machines from the company (because I was at one time so keen to know which was the "best" machine)
I also own a complete Stringlab 2 Test system (which I prefer using for string bed tension readings over my Babolat RDC) and a set of the cross stringing tools (which I never use).
I have also owned other manufactures stringing machines, and enjoyed using them.

For me the thing about asking for help picking out a stringing machine is similar to asking what brand and style of (fill in the blank). There may not be a single "best for everyone" choice to be offered.
Every machine I have worked with has it's "faults", and by that I mean something that will require a different approach then whatever the machine that is the stringer's current reference.
Once you use the machine regularly and sort it out, you stop noticing it (or if not, sell it and move on) In my mind, many times, "work arounds" are what being a stringer is about.

Stringway has been in the marketplace for many years. The owner/designer is accessible (for some reason his tone seems to alienate a percentage of TT posters). Is there a Mr Gamma who helped design their products 30 years ago and will answer questions on a discontinued product ? I think not, BUT that doesn't mean a Gamma machine is a bad choice. Just a different one.
I could tell anecdotal stories about different companies products that have failed in some way but that does not make for a complete picture.

The OP seems like a relative novice to stringing and if he were to ask, I would say, make a decision and start stringing. It may not be as fun as playing tennis but it's better then doing chores around the house and if you like music you can play tunes and string at the same time. I don't recommend watching movies with subtitles as you string though.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
So much for Stringway's direct support system and those comical fear-provoking diagrams Technatic posts showing what epic failures other manufacturers' support systems are! :rolleyes::sneaky::laughing::-D

That large piece that broke on the ML100 was made out of some hard plasticky material.

Technatic and Jaycee seem to have converted a bunch of people, preying on their insecurities by basically insulting them and the stringing machines they use - saying stuff along the lines of "...the crank machines preferred by American stringers." People underestimate the power of those methods.
Thank goodness that there are people on these boards who can describe what actually happens on a molecular level, and not just parrot that anything other than Stringway "kills" polyester strings.
Yeah frankly, I haven't honestly known what to make of all the elitist statements and superiority - from the people you mentioned, and others. My guess is, if the leaders and surrogates of Stringway softened their rhetoric a bit, they would probably gain significant market share. But hey, what do I know?

As for that failure, on one hand, I wouldn't necessarily think Stringway would be significantly more or less immune to a manufacturing defect than one of it's competitors would be. On the other hand, the way Stringway currently presents itself and talks about their competitors, a Stringway customer could be forgiven for thinking that something like what happened to the ML100 in the picture you posted, should never happen.
 
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