***Stringway Machine Users Club***

Why do you call it "light weight". It's over 10 kg and with additional clamps and tools it will be probably over 12 kg.
It's portable, but not light weight. In this case it doesn't much matter using the spring or drop weight tensioner. Drop weight is more reliable option.

For light weight stringing machine, see MiStringer, weight is less than 3 kg, fixed clamps, 6 point support.
 
Why do you call it "light weight". It's over 10 kg and with additional clamps and tools it will be probably over 12 kg.
It's portable, but not light weight. In this case it doesn't much matter using the spring or drop weight tensioner. Drop weight is more reliable option.

For light weight stringing machine, see MiStringer, weight is less than 3 kg, fixed clamps, 6 point support.
The MiStringer appears to be designed for true portable use where the stringing quantities are very low.

The Stringway machine looks to be more of a portable version of a full fledged stringing machine. It could be used as a regular stringing machine at home base as well as taken out on the road for serious use.

I imagine the Stringway machine will still be delivering reliable service many many years hence. Just look at how the thing is constructed!
 
Why do you call it "light weight". It's over 10 kg and with additional clamps and tools it will be probably over 12 kg.
The machine weighs 6,5 kg including clamps.
I think this is very light for a very serious long lasting machine?
 

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I have a friend who knows some one who has strung with the MiStringer. Very bad results. So sorry they wasted time/money.
Maybe move to the other thread . . . would be interested in the details concerning the "very bad results" including the experience of the operator. Also for what it is worth, I don't think the MiStringer is targeted at the same consumer as is the Stringway portable (no question the SW is a superior machine).
 
marco forehand,
It's not the place to discuss MiStringer, unfortunately what you said about MiStringer machine can't be entirely true.
MiStringer has 60-day return policy.
Why did your friend decide to keep the machine and waste the money?
 
I'm just curious, how long do you guys pull tension before clamping for stretchy and poly strings? I clamp two or three seconds after I see the DW at rest. For gut that can take a while to happen.
 
Hi Guys,

We get questions about pulling tension on the knot and the “loose” part of the string between the knot and the clamp regularly.

We advise to use a hook that we also use to get 2 strings, with one diagonal, through one grommet hole.

Like this



And the hook is very simple like a string mover but with a longer hook.
 
From some stringers who do not want to travel with the machine we got the question if the MS140 is also available with the normal Stringway direct 5-point racquet mounting.

Traveling with this machine is more difficult ofcourse.

 
Do you guys know how much it would cost for single action clamps and the side attachment rods? I'm thinking of upgrading my ML90 but the Stringway website doesn't sell those parts separately.

@Technatic I was told you might be able to help.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 
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Hi guys,

The stressful part of launching a new product is in the question: “What will be the opinion of the users”.

This stress is gone and we only discuss small details that could be improved with the users.

The exciting part of launching such a different product is:

How to convince the user especially in a market where “being used to” counts as a heavy argument”

Therefore we added a page on our site that explains the new principles on the MS140 compared to known principles.

We call this page “ The simplicity of the MS140”.

These are some pictures of principles used.



- With most cradles the “towers” are clamped on the main beam and the friction has to prevent that the supports move inwards.

The forces of the main strings cause a bending load on the main beam, which will bend the beam under this load.


This results in a pressing force in the spindle and pulling force in the frame of the cradle. Parts are much stronger against pulling forces and pressing forces than against bending forces.

This is why this cradle is very stiff.

- The screw spindle also makes it possible to adjust the racquet support very accurately at the size of the racquet head.

 
I’m happy owner of MS140 and I would like to put my 5 cents in.
MS140 is compact, professional level machine with constant pull.
The machine is well built, easy to use and stringing results are very consistent.
Fast clamp is a nice feature, but if you don’t like it, there is a version MS140 with the hooks.

Stringway MS140 vs Gamma X-ELS electronic stringing machine:
Price for Gamma X-ELS is over $1200 vs $600-$700 for Stringway MS140.
Gamma X-ElS is 20 kg vs 7 kg Stringway MS140.
Stringway flying clamps are better than Gamma clamps. I think the diamond powder on Gamma clamps is too aggressive for the strings.

Stringway has outstanding customer service and I’m very grateful to Fred Timmer for his support and his patience.
 
Because if the MS140 produces the same results as the Gamma then it is much better value.

It doesn't matter what the machine is, what matters is the results it produces.

The MS140's portability is a huge advantage for many stringers.
 
Thank you! That's exactly what I meant.

In the past, I had chance to use Gamma X-ElS a few times and I think that stringing on MS140 is faster and more pleasant.
By operation MS140 is similar to crank machine with accuracy of electronic stringer.
To check MS140 tension system, I used electronic tension calibrator to set the tension 51 lb, before stinging . After finishing the stringing, I checked the tension again. The tension was practically the same.
 
Thank you! That's exactly what I meant.

In the past, I had chance to use Gamma X-ElS a few times and I think that stringing on MS140 is faster and more pleasant.
By operation MS140 is similar to crank machine with accuracy of electronic stringer.
Of course, I think you would be better to say "consistency of electronic stringer when stringing a range of different racquets at different tensions".

I have a 25 year old LO Crank stringing machine. I string a very limited range of racquets in a limited range of tensions and my results are very consistent.

However, I'm certain using the Stringway Automatic DW system would be much easier than using a Crank.

I mentioned to Fred if he would consider producing a tensioning solution to retrofit to LO machines (a la the WISE solution). However, it would probably reduce sales of existing machines so I can understand why Stringway wouldn't be keen to do it. It would have to come in at a price point that is at most 30% of the retail cost of a WISE electronic head to make it viable. So on that basis alone it probably isn't worthwhile.
 
I've had a Stringway ML100, fixed clamps, tennis/badminton
Of course, I think you would be better to say "consistency of electronic stringer when stringing a range of different racquets at different tensions".

I have a 25 year old LO Crank stringing machine. I string a very limited range of racquets in a limited range of tensions and my results are very consistent.

However, I'm certain using the Stringway Automatic DW system would be much easier than using a Crank.

I mentioned to Fred if he would consider producing a tensioning solution to retrofit to LO machines (a la the WISE solution). However, it would probably reduce sales of existing machines so I can understand why Stringway wouldn't be keen to do it. It would have to come in at a price point that is at most 30% of the retail cost of a WISE electronic head to make it viable. So on that basis alone it probably isn't worthwhile.
 
A year ago I bought a Stringway ML100, fixed clamps, tennis/badminton, cross stringing gadgets etc. I'm really happy with the purchase, so I wrote to Fred to let him know. Figured I ought to post it here too. Not mentioned in the review, but oh, so important, has been Fred's own attentive service, patience, and responsiveness.

Hi Fred,

It's been about a year since I purchased an ML-100 with tennis and badminton fixed clamps and accessories. I've strung about 200 racquets since then, about 50/50 tennis and badminton. Some of my customers are quite discerning. I do stringing for 3 of the the province's top ten tennis players as well as the reigning provincial champion in badminton.

I'd just like to report that my Stringway ML100 has performed flawlessly, not even the slightest deficiency in that time. I've done regular maintenance as required and all moving parts are functioning like brand new. Naturally, over that time I've become more efficient at setup, stringing and switching between tennis and badminton modes, but efficiency matters little to me since I so thoroughly enjoy the pleasure this hobby brings me. Good tools enhance that pleasure.

I've also become quite confident using the cross-stringing tools. Now I can't imagine doing without them! What I like most is what I believe is a bump in overall quality because there is no string burning or even minor friction. It means that crosses and mains are getting virtually the same, non-intrusive handling. This is especially important with natural gut. An added bonus is I never make any weaving errors, meaning I can enjoy the process of cross-stringing without having to concentrate so intensely on avoiding slip-ups. Discovering an inadvertent double-under or double-over error with the conventional cross-stringing technique isn't a big deal to fix, but it does disrupt work flow. When you think of the hundreds of cross-sections, up and down, the stringbed, the tool really goes towards a more relaxed approach to doing crosses.

So, in summary, after one year of regular use of my Stringway ML100, I'd like to let you know that this stringing machine and tools are the best investment I've ever made, in terms of fun, reliability, toughness, accuracy, and yes, financially too. Mine is just a micro-business type of hobby for me, but I've managed to earn enough in revenue to completely pay for the machine.

I'll get back to you in again with a 5-year review or maybe a 10-review. I suspect it will be really easy, just copy/paste this one and change the date!

I'm one very happy customer!

Best of luck in your business. I hope Stringway is doing well and will continue to do well for many years.

Bob
Summerside, Prince Edward Island, Canada
 
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Your post made me dig in the memory and I realised that I will have 1 year anniversary too next month :D
It's kind of a quirky habit for me to review the performance and my satisfaction with products over a period of time--lawnmower, snowblower, bicycle, stringing machine. It triggers questions like, Did I make the right choice? Do I still like the design? Do I think it will last? Has it been reliable? Would you buy something different next time? Do I have any constructive suggestions for the supplier to help them improve their product?

Let's face, too. Complaining is easy. Complaining is rampant. People will take the time to complain when things go wrong. Sometimes it gets nasty. Few people, however, take the time to offer thanks when things go right.

Don't get me wrong. Complaining can help companies improve their products and services. But a pat on the back is one small but important gesture to help reassure a corporate leader that they're doing okay. They're only human, like the rest of us.

bob
 
Based on feedback from users and potential buyers we decided to upgrade the racquet clamp of the MS140 at the head side. Stringers feel more confident with this system.

We will supply the machines with this system from now on.

Of course it is available for all users.



 
We are going “out of the box” a little:

We are looking for soccer fanatics so that we can get an opinion about our new idea.

We developed a “Quality calculator” which calculates the total quality of a team and player based on the scores of 21 basic skills.


The basic idea is that the trainer can judge the individual skills very well but it is impossible to combine all the figures to totals.

The results are divided in attack, defense and mentally /physically
 
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I am interested in purchasing a ml-100 but wanted to first clarify something about the tensioner. I am purchasing the machine to string my own racquets and string natural gut (VS) in the mains (Prince Graphite mid-plus). Does the drop weight have enough range to tension the longer gut mains without bottoming out? In other words, does the gut string stop its most significant plastic deformation before the stringway bottoms out? I am not interested in the machine if I need to do a re-pull "two step process" because my gut mains bottom out. In that case I would consider something like a Wise tensioner on a Prince Neos. Your feedback is much appreciated. Thanks!
 
I am interested in purchasing a ml-100 but wanted to first clarify something about the tensioner. I am purchasing the machine to string my own racquets and string natural gut (VS) in the mains (Prince Graphite mid-plus). Does the drop weight have enough range to tension the longer gut mains without bottoming out? In other words, does the gut string stop its most significant plastic deformation before the stringway bottoms out? I am not interested in the machine if I need to do a re-pull "two step process" because my gut mains bottom out. In that case I would consider something like a Wise tensioner on a Prince Neos. Your feedback is much appreciated. Thanks!
I owned an ML100 before I switched over to the foot-operated machine (MS 200 ?). If memory serves, the standard weight that comes with the machine has a maximum tension of around 60 lbs, so if you plan to go higher than that, you need to purchase an extra weight.

I do believe that stretchy strings can force you to pull twice. At least with the MS200, I had to do that quite often.

The other thing I hated about the ML100 was having to use the ruler to set tension, because the numbers are not printed directly on the tensioning arm/rod.
 
Yes, stretchy strings can be tricky. I normally "pre-stretch" while putting the string in the clamp with one movement. Then I very rarely have to pull twice.

And the ruler.... Would be nice if it was engraved on the rod. But, as you can use different weights, and pounds or kilo's, it would be a mess (and actually impossible). For me the ruler works fast and accurate.
 
Yeah, Yanter, you may be imagining doing 30-40 bicep curls, all with one arm. I've done a few hundred racquets, badminton and tennis with the ML100 (fixed), and some with stretchy gut or syngut. The first few mains, yeah, very occasionally may require a couple of lifts, but after that marginally slow start, no more doubles. By far, the majority of pulls with most strings would not bottom out.

I assume if this is a deal-breaker for you, the fatal flaw, you're finding all other things equal between the ML100 and other machines. I hope you don't consider it an engineering mistake, but more you're own peculiar, do-or-die pet-peeve. My final selection of the ML100 came as a result of holistic comparison with other machines, build-quality, simplicity, versatility, design, cost, accessories, operating procedures, mounting system, brake, modularity, ease of repair, corporate support, clamp quality, life-cycle costs, expected life, resale value, maintenance demands.

So, yeah, in a scoring matrix with all these types of criteria, the ML100 might score slip a little on this one aspect of operating, but in the whole scheme of evaluation this weakness would not likely exert a distorting influence. Instead, it would show for what I'd consider it is, a minor blip, a trivial irritant.

In conclusion, I'd be somewhat suspect that your own idiosyncratic and quite singular preference doesn't cause you to wander to far from all the other machine attributes you could and should be weighing and comparing.

Good luck, whatever your final selection!
 
Yes, stretchy strings can be tricky. I normally "pre-stretch" while putting the string in the clamp with one movement. Then I very rarely have to pull twice.

And the ruler.... Would be nice if it was engraved on the rod. But, as you can use different weights, and pounds or kilo's, it would be a mess (and actually impossible). For me the ruler works fast and accurate.
I agree. I actually prefer the separate ruler. It's dead simple, accurate, reliable, versatile for lots of different situations, and I'll bet way less an expense pressure on the cost to produce and sell the machine. I also have an older Klippermate, besides my ML100, and the tension markers on the rod are worn, too small to read easy, chipped and peeling. Still works fine, but looking a little tawdry and tired, unlike my ML100, whose rod and ruler are still in mint condition after 100's of uses.
 
Yeah, Yanter, you may be imagining doing 30-40 bicep curls, all with one arm. I've done a few hundred racquets, badminton and tennis with the ML100 (fixed), and some with stretchy gut or syngut. The first few mains, yeah, very occasionally may require a couple of lifts, but after that marginally slow start, no more doubles. By far, the majority of pulls with most strings would not bottom out.

I assume if this is a deal-breaker for you, the fatal flaw, you're finding all other things equal between the ML100 and other machines. I hope you don't consider it an engineering mistake, but more you're own peculiar, do-or-die pet-peeve. My final selection of the ML100 came as a result of holistic comparison with other machines, build-quality, simplicity, versatility, design, cost, accessories, operating procedures, mounting system, brake, modularity, ease of repair, corporate support, clamp quality, life-cycle costs, expected life, resale value, maintenance demands.

So, yeah, in a scoring matrix with all these types of criteria, the ML100 might score slip a little on this one aspect of operating, but in the whole scheme of evaluation this weakness would not likely exert a distorting influence. Instead, it would show for what I'd consider it is, a minor blip, a trivial irritant.

In conclusion, I'd be somewhat suspect that your own idiosyncratic and quite singular preference doesn't cause you to wander to far from all the other machine attributes you could and should be weighing and comparing.

Good luck, whatever your final selection!
 
Thanks for all the replies! I even got a response by Fred Timmer himself today. From the responses on this forum it seems that even with gut in the mains, the double tensioning can be alleviated by pre-stretching the string. As Fred Timmer stated, and the engineering makes sense, is that as long as the pre-stretch tension is less than the tension being pulled with the drop-weight, the playability of the gut wont be affected. So it looks like I am leaning more towards going the ml-100 route at this point. I am going to experiment first with pre-stretching the gut first to 40lbs and then tensioning to 60lbs on my friend's gamma drop weight machine. That should give me a good idea of how I like the procedure in practice.
 
Hi guys,

OF course it is fantastic to hear that people are so happy with our machines and for so many years.

Hereby an advise concerning stringing stretchy strings on the machine:

Most of the elongation in a string is remaining elongation this is 2 to 3 times more than the elastic elongation. (On monos up to 6 times more)

All the remaining elongation that was “removed” from the string in a first pull, does not have to be developed in the second.

Our advises when you string stretchy strings are:

- Do the second pull without moving the clamps. Just lift the lever, tighten the string and pull again. The tensioner needs less travel for the second pull.

- Prestretch the hole length of string by hand before you start to string. As long as you stay below the stringing tension this does not have any influence on the playability and it strings easier and with less loss of tension.
 
After many years with the same pricing we have to raise the price for the Stringlab 2 in January 2019 because of the higher price of the parts.

This counts for all Stringlab systems:











 
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