***Stringway Machine Users Club***

elkwood

Hall of Fame
Figured it out. After removing one side of the stand/legs, I was able to fully visualize the locking pin and the spring.
<a href=" "><img src=" " title="source: imgur.com" /></a>


It looks like when the pin is in the non-locking position or down position, the knob/lever and pin is supposed to hold the spring down, under compression. In other words, the spring should always be pushing the pin up. My spring had coiled up the pin and around the knob/lever enough so that it was no longer under compression and therefore unable to push the pin up.

Simple Fix: Simply unscrew the knob/lever from the pin, push the spring down below the level of where the knob/lever screws into the locking pin, screw knob/lever back into the pin, keeping the spring compressed below the knob/lever.
<a href=" "><img src=" " title="source: imgur.com" /></a>
<a href=" "><img src="https://i.imgur.com/vVMIYhX.jpg" title="source: imgur.com" /></a>

Hope this helps others. I do wonder how long it will take for the spring to coil itself back up past the level of the Knob/Lever...

-Br.

Thanks for posting all this !! It inspired me to fix my ML-100. I had an issue where the lock wouldn't function. Though
i had a different problem your journey helped me to figure it out.

Mine had to do with the Center pivot that the turn table goes into.

The two big nuts on the side allow u to center that part. Mine came out of Alignment which prevented the pin from engaging into the
holes correctly. It been like that since shortly after i got it. I just ignored it till u posted in this thread.

Its nice since I now string up some O port prince racquets.
 

BravoRed691

Semi-Pro
Thanks for posting all this !! It inspired me to fix my ML-100. I had an issue where the lock wouldn't function. Though
i had a different problem your journey helped me to figure it out.

Mine had to do with the Center pivot that the turn table goes into.

The two big nuts on the side allow u to center that part. Mine came out of Alignment which prevented the pin from engaging into the
holes correctly. It been like that since shortly after i got it. I just ignored it till u posted in this thread.

Its nice since I now string up some O port prince racquets.
Thanks to the community and to Stringway for being so active on here! Here's to hoping for theirs and everyones continued support.

-Br.
 
Very often solutions are simple but not when you do not know the details of the design. Therefore it is often very easy and nice to support users.

Mine had to do with the Center pivot that the turn table goes into.
Keep in mind that it is not the intention to lock the table in the Concorde situation!

 
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BravoRed691

Semi-Pro
Hi all! Another Question on the ML100-T92 ...seeing if anyone has come across this:

One day, I noticed the tensioning head and bar/arm leaning laterally to one side of center whenever I lower the tension lever/arm. Upon inspection, this pin had slid in out of its hole and almost thru to the other side of the tension head; the washers had fallen off as they were no longer being held in place by the pin. I did not take a pic of that, hope this makes sense:



I did manage to put the pin (centered it) and the washers back in place. But after only 2 string jobs, the pin has moved this much:

I just realized that i don't have a before and after pic from the same side but the position of the pin in the before pic is the same from both sides.


Any ideas guys?

Thanks in Advance!

-Br.
 



Some more information about the use of the Concorde system.

- The machines are also available without the Concorde system. For Badminton and squash the system is not needed.

- When there is no Concorde system on the machine we advise to do a double pull towards the head for the strings ending in the bridge.
Depending on the roughness and stiffness of the string the tension should be raised then by 3 to 5 kg.
 
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There are a lot of old Stringway in use so it could be good to know how to overhaul a clamp.
It is seldom necessary to buy new clamps.

D. OVERHAUL OF A STRINGWAY CLAMP.
After extensive use the clamps of the Stringway machines can be overhauled quite easily. Figure 1 shows the parts of the clamp.



DISASSEMBLY
For the disassembly and assembly it is easy to use a vise or a special piece of wood with a slot in it to hold the clamp as shown in figure 2.



To disassemble the clamp unscrew the Alan bolt and take of the closing mechanism.

GRINDING THE CLAMP PARTS.



To clamp the string with a minimum clamping force the clamping surface must be equally rough.
Grind the clamping surface by moving the clamp up and down over a piece of grinding cloth.
Support the grinding cloth on a flat surface like a table.

THE ASSEMBLY OF THE CLAMP.
- Put the spring in the hole between the front and the back of the clamp.
- Clamp both castings on top of each other in the clamping device.
- Put the Alan bolt in from the back.
- Put the square nut on the Alan bolt and screw the bolt into the nut until the nut is level with the surface of the clamp.



- Slide the spring washer over the Alan bolt.
- Turn the pull rod of the eccentric set on the Alan bolt until it compresses the spring washer completely.
- Turn the pull rod ¼ revolution backwards.
- If the eccentric is in the right position, with the handle downwards, turn the Alan bolt into the pull rod until the nylon washer hits the surface of the clamp.
If the closing mechanism is in the wrong position:



- Unscrew the Alan bolt holding the eccentric, so that the square nut comes out of the hole in the clamp.
- Turn the pull rod / eccentric in the right position.
- Turn the Alan Bolt into the pull rod until the nylon washer hits the surface of the clamp.

GREASING THE CLAMP.
For easy up and down sliding of the clamp it is advised to insert a thick layer of grease into the hollow that clamps the clamp on the pin of the sliding system.
 
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