***Stringway Machine Users Club***

elkwood

Hall of Fame
Figured it out. After removing one side of the stand/legs, I was able to fully visualize the locking pin and the spring.
<a href=" "><img src=" " title="source: imgur.com" /></a>


It looks like when the pin is in the non-locking position or down position, the knob/lever and pin is supposed to hold the spring down, under compression. In other words, the spring should always be pushing the pin up. My spring had coiled up the pin and around the knob/lever enough so that it was no longer under compression and therefore unable to push the pin up.

Simple Fix: Simply unscrew the knob/lever from the pin, push the spring down below the level of where the knob/lever screws into the locking pin, screw knob/lever back into the pin, keeping the spring compressed below the knob/lever.
<a href=" "><img src=" " title="source: imgur.com" /></a>
<a href=" "><img src="https://i.imgur.com/vVMIYhX.jpg" title="source: imgur.com" /></a>

Hope this helps others. I do wonder how long it will take for the spring to coil itself back up past the level of the Knob/Lever...

-Br.

Thanks for posting all this !! It inspired me to fix my ML-100. I had an issue where the lock wouldn't function. Though
i had a different problem your journey helped me to figure it out.

Mine had to do with the Center pivot that the turn table goes into.

The two big nuts on the side allow u to center that part. Mine came out of Alignment which prevented the pin from engaging into the
holes correctly. It been like that since shortly after i got it. I just ignored it till u posted in this thread.

Its nice since I now string up some O port prince racquets.
 

BravoRed691

Semi-Pro
Thanks for posting all this !! It inspired me to fix my ML-100. I had an issue where the lock wouldn't function. Though
i had a different problem your journey helped me to figure it out.

Mine had to do with the Center pivot that the turn table goes into.

The two big nuts on the side allow u to center that part. Mine came out of Alignment which prevented the pin from engaging into the
holes correctly. It been like that since shortly after i got it. I just ignored it till u posted in this thread.

Its nice since I now string up some O port prince racquets.
Thanks to the community and to Stringway for being so active on here! Here's to hoping for theirs and everyones continued support.

-Br.
 
Very often solutions are simple but not when you do not know the details of the design. Therefore it is often very easy and nice to support users.

Mine had to do with the Center pivot that the turn table goes into.
Keep in mind that it is not the intention to lock the table in the Concorde situation!

 
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BravoRed691

Semi-Pro
Hi all! Another Question on the ML100-T92 ...seeing if anyone has come across this:

One day, I noticed the tensioning head and bar/arm leaning laterally to one side of center whenever I lower the tension lever/arm. Upon inspection, this pin had slid in out of its hole and almost thru to the other side of the tension head; the washers had fallen off as they were no longer being held in place by the pin. I did not take a pic of that, hope this makes sense:



I did manage to put the pin (centered it) and the washers back in place. But after only 2 string jobs, the pin has moved this much:

I just realized that i don't have a before and after pic from the same side but the position of the pin in the before pic is the same from both sides.


Any ideas guys?

Thanks in Advance!

-Br.
 



Some more information about the use of the Concorde system.

- The machines are also available without the Concorde system. For Badminton and squash the system is not needed.

- When there is no Concorde system on the machine we advise to do a double pull towards the head for the strings ending in the bridge.
Depending on the roughness and stiffness of the string the tension should be raised then by 3 to 5 kg.
 
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There are a lot of old Stringway in use so it could be good to know how to overhaul a clamp.
It is seldom necessary to buy new clamps.

D. OVERHAUL OF A STRINGWAY CLAMP.
After extensive use the clamps of the Stringway machines can be overhauled quite easily. Figure 1 shows the parts of the clamp.



DISASSEMBLY
For the disassembly and assembly it is easy to use a vise or a special piece of wood with a slot in it to hold the clamp as shown in figure 2.



To disassemble the clamp unscrew the Alan bolt and take of the closing mechanism.

GRINDING THE CLAMP PARTS.



To clamp the string with a minimum clamping force the clamping surface must be equally rough.
Grind the clamping surface by moving the clamp up and down over a piece of grinding cloth.
Support the grinding cloth on a flat surface like a table.

THE ASSEMBLY OF THE CLAMP.
- Put the spring in the hole between the front and the back of the clamp.
- Clamp both castings on top of each other in the clamping device.
- Put the Alan bolt in from the back.
- Put the square nut on the Alan bolt and screw the bolt into the nut until the nut is level with the surface of the clamp.



- Slide the spring washer over the Alan bolt.
- Turn the pull rod of the eccentric set on the Alan bolt until it compresses the spring washer completely.
- Turn the pull rod ¼ revolution backwards.
- If the eccentric is in the right position, with the handle downwards, turn the Alan bolt into the pull rod until the nylon washer hits the surface of the clamp.
If the closing mechanism is in the wrong position:



- Unscrew the Alan bolt holding the eccentric, so that the square nut comes out of the hole in the clamp.
- Turn the pull rod / eccentric in the right position.
- Turn the Alan Bolt into the pull rod until the nylon washer hits the surface of the clamp.

GREASING THE CLAMP.
For easy up and down sliding of the clamp it is advised to insert a thick layer of grease into the hollow that clamps the clamp on the pin of the sliding system.
 
Stringway machines with flying clamps can easily be upgraded to single action fixed clamps by the owners themselves.



For older machines this can only be done when the main beam has a T-slot and the distance between the cross holes is 400 mm.

This is how that goes:
* Unscrew one of the crossbars that connect the main guiding bars to the turntable.
* Slide the sliding units onto each guiding bar as shown on the photo.
* Fix the second crossbar to the guiding bars again.
* Unscrew the bolts that fix the crossbars to the main bars ONLY ONE TURN.
* Mix the epoxy glue in an ration of 1 : 1.
* Insert a layer of glue all round into the holes in the turntable.
* Move crossbars into the holes in the turntable until the sliding unit can be hooked into the T-slot in the beam.



* Move EACH crossbar back until the piece of wire (diameter = 1,5 mm) fits between the hook and the casting as shown on the photo.
CHECK THIS ON BOTH CROSS BARS
* Carefully slide the sliding unit over the main bar from one end to the other and check if it moves freely.
* Let the hole system untouched for 24 hrs to harden the glue.

If you have any questions just let me know.
 

BravoRed691

Semi-Pro
Hello BravoRed691
The solution to your problem is easy and small.

Just tighten the little locking bolt shown on this picture.

Hi Stringway Official,

Unfortunately, tightening that little locking bolt has not done the trick. Perhaps I didn't tighten it enough? Is there a danger of over-tightening it?

-Br.
 

Binatang

Rookie
Thank you for the add to the group. Here are two videos that I have made hope you can use it to improve your own stringing proocess with MS140
1. main strings
2. Bird's eye view
Just some observations on your stringing technique.
1) You are not tensioning the 2 center mains. You start tensioning from the 2nd left & right mains only. Learn the Yusuki method & getting a starting clamp or make a dummy string starter.
2) At 4.46 of the main string video you are re-pulling after you had released the flying clamp. You will lose tension this way as you are releasing the jaw each time you re-pull. The reason the tension drops so much is because you didn't tension the center mains so you were essentially double pulling.
 

gkhitrov

New User
Here is the video for cross strings. I'm stringing for my son and myself only so if you have a constructive advice, happy to learn from the pros.
 

Binatang

Rookie
Here is the video for cross strings. I'm stringing for my son and myself only so if you have a constructive advice, happy to learn from the pros.
This is more personal preference more than anything else.
1) After pulling tension, I would not clamp off immediately. I would tension & string the next cross before clamping.
Eg. If I were pulling Cross No. 3, I would leave it tensioned while I string Cross 4. Only after stringing Cross 4 would I clamp Cross 3
This will allow you to take advantage of the Stringway's constant pull to remove all the elongation from the string. Which takes about 6 secs according to Stringway. Needs some getting use to as you can't move the turntable while tensioning.

2) For the last 2 crosses I would do something akin to the Yonex Loop with an additional 4kg for the last 2 crosses. Assuming a 16X19 frame, after tensioning Cross 17, I would string the last cross 19 (+4kg) before looping back to do Cross 18 (+4kg) then tie off. This reduce tension loss at tie-offs. If you were doing 2 piece, I would do the Yonex Loop on the last 2 L &R mains also.
 

gkhitrov

New User
This is more personal preference more than anything else.
1) After pulling tension, I would not clamp off immediately. I would tension & string the next cross before clamping.
Eg. If I were pulling Cross No. 3, I would leave it tensioned while I string Cross 4. Only after stringing Cross 4 would I clamp Cross 3
This will allow you to take advantage of the Stringway's constant pull to remove all the elongation from the string. Which takes about 6 secs according to Stringway. Needs some getting use to as you can't move the turntable while tensioning.

2) For the last 2 crosses I would do something akin to the Yonex Loop with an additional 4kg for the last 2 crosses. Assuming a 16X19 frame, after tensioning Cross 17, I would string the last cross 19 (+4kg) before looping back to do Cross 18 (+4kg) then tie off. This reduce tension loss at tie-offs. If you were doing 2 piece, I would do the Yonex Loop on the last 2 L &R mains also.
1. Great point!
2. That's exactly what I do for both mains and crosses
Thank you your for the suggestions
 

Binatang

Rookie
1. Great point!
2. That's exactly what I do for both mains and crosses
Thank you your for the suggestions
Yes I see that you're adding extra pounds to the last 2 mains & crosses.
But if you want to do the Yonex Loop you would need to string the last main or cross 2nd to last.
Eg. For 16x19 Mains. The stringing order would 6H, 8H, 7H then Tie-off.
This avoids tension lost on the last main or cross that will affect the stringbed.

The Yonex Loop was developed for badminton & Yonex stringers adapted it for tennis.
I think Richard Parnell was the 1st to start adding 4kgs (not lbs) to the last 2 mains & crosses & its known as the Parnell Loop in some circles.
If you try adding the 4kgs to the last 2 mains using the Yonex Loop, you will find the tension of all the mains remarkably similar when you press down on them after you have completed the mains. You will be pleasantly surprised!
 
Concerning the videos of the MS140.

We are against the use of awls therefore 2 solutions which might work better.

Use a hook to pull a string away to make room for the second string.


Use a hook to pull tension on the piece of string between the clamp and the knot.




When a string covers another hole in the grommet, put a little piece of string under that string.
With this piece of string in a plier you can pull the string away so that you can insert the other string in the hole.
 
When a string covers another hole in the grommet, put a little piece of string under that string.
With this piece of string in a plier you can pull the string away so that you can insert the other string in the hole.
Another widely used trick is to place a short piece of scrap string - a stiffish poly works best - through the grommet holes which are about to be covered by newly tensioned strings. The scrap bits will provide a clear pathway which will be sufficient for strings to pass through as the scrap bit is slowly pulled out of the hole while the new string is being inserted from the opposite side of the hole.

The good thing about this method is that it does not require any additional tools and no direct force is applied to the strings blocking the hole.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Another widely used trick is to place a short piece of scrap string - a stiffish poly works best - through the grommet holes which are about to be covered by newly tensioned strings. The scrap bits will provide a clear pathway which will be sufficient for strings to pass through as the scrap bit is slowly pulled out of the hole while the new string is being inserted from the opposite side of the hole.

The good thing about this method is that it does not require any additional tools and no direct force is applied to the strings blocking the hole.
Any 15 gauge (thick) string will work.
 
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