Sunglasses ... Yes, No & Which?

randzman

Rookie
Hi, I don't wear glasses and have never owned sunglasses but now I'm starting to play outside I'd like to know my options past the dollar store.

The little research I've done indicates that green is the best tint.

Green: Green tints filter some blue light and reduce glare, while offering high contrast and visual sharpness. Shades of green also tend to reduce eyestrain in bright light. Choose green for precision sports such as tennis, baseball and golf.

Gray: Gray is a popular neutral tint that allows the eyes to perceive colors in their purest form. Gray tints reduce brightness and glare. Choose gray for driving and outdoor sports such as golf, running or cycling.

Yellow/Orange: Yellow and orange tints increase contrast in hazy, foggy or low-light conditions. These tints tend to make objects appear sharper both indoors and outdoors, but can also cause color distortion. Choose yellow shades for snow activities and indoor ball sports.

Amber/Brown: Amber and brown tints reduce glare and block blue light, giving them the ability to brighten vision on cloudy days. By blocking blue light, these tints increase contrast and visual acuity, especially against green and blue backgrounds such as grass and sky. Choose amber and brown tints for fishing, baseball, golf, hunting, cycling, and water sports.

Melanin - Melanin pigment in sunglass tints are said to protect the eyes from aging changes related to sun exposure. There is also some evidence that melanin has protective effects for people with macular degeneration.

Rose/Red: Rosy tints increase contrast by blocking blue light. These tints have a reputation of being soothing to the eyes and more comfortable than others for longer wear-times. They also help with visibility while driving, and seem to be a favorite among computer users as they reduce glare and eyestrain.

However I want to know more about Visible Light Transmission because the $25 drugstore Foster Grant sunglasses I've seen are basically very dark and almost very dark.

But it seems to me I actually want not too much change in visible light ... I just want to take the edge off the glare.

So I found these values for Visible Light Transmission.

0–19% VLT: Ideal for bright, sunny conditions.
20–40% VLT: Good for all-purpose use.
40+% VLT: Best for overcast and low-light conditions.
80–90+% VLT: Virtually clear lenses for very dim and night conditions.

Here's a couple charts I merged.

It seems to me I do want green, 70/80%.

Can you folks confirm this works well on the court... and what frames you use? Cost?

Polarized? UVA/UVB needed? Extra large lenses? Do you use a strap?

I'd only be using them for tennis.

Thank you, Randy


chart on the web.
 

weelie

Semi-Pro
I do wear glasses, but I always wear a cap. Sunglasses just never felt useful for me. They might be a healthy choice for eye health, with UV blocking. But the cap set a shade for me to see better.

Interesting bit about green tint for tennis, thanks.
 

SlvrDragon50

Semi-Pro
Oakley Prizm and Smith ChromaPop work. I'd try them out and maybe bring a tennis ball to see which ones make it pop the most.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
Hi, I don't wear glasses and have never owned sunglasses but now I'm starting to play outside I'd like to know my options past the dollar store.

The little research I've done indicates that green is the best tint.

Green: Green tints filter some blue light and reduce glare, while offering high contrast and visual sharpness. Shades of green also tend to reduce eyestrain in bright light. Choose green for precision sports such as tennis, baseball and golf.

Gray: Gray is a popular neutral tint that allows the eyes to perceive colors in their purest form. Gray tints reduce brightness and glare. Choose gray for driving and outdoor sports such as golf, running or cycling.

Yellow/Orange: Yellow and orange tints increase contrast in hazy, foggy or low-light conditions. These tints tend to make objects appear sharper both indoors and outdoors, but can also cause color distortion. Choose yellow shades for snow activities and indoor ball sports.

Amber/Brown: Amber and brown tints reduce glare and block blue light, giving them the ability to brighten vision on cloudy days. By blocking blue light, these tints increase contrast and visual acuity, especially against green and blue backgrounds such as grass and sky. Choose amber and brown tints for fishing, baseball, golf, hunting, cycling, and water sports.

Melanin - Melanin pigment in sunglass tints are said to protect the eyes from aging changes related to sun exposure. There is also some evidence that melanin has protective effects for people with macular degeneration.

Rose/Red: Rosy tints increase contrast by blocking blue light. These tints have a reputation of being soothing to the eyes and more comfortable than others for longer wear-times. They also help with visibility while driving, and seem to be a favorite among computer users as they reduce glare and eyestrain.

However I want to know more about Visible Light Transmission because the $25 drugstore Foster Grant sunglasses I've seen are basically very dark and almost very dark.

But it seems to me I actually want not too much change in visible light ... I just want to take the edge off the glare.

So I found these values for Visible Light Transmission.

0–19% VLT: Ideal for bright, sunny conditions.
20–40% VLT: Good for all-purpose use.
40+% VLT: Best for overcast and low-light conditions.
80–90+% VLT: Virtually clear lenses for very dim and night conditions.

Here's a couple charts I merged.

It seems to me I do want green, 70/80%.

Can you folks confirm this works well on the court... and what frames you use? Cost?

Polarized? UVA/UVB needed? Extra large lenses? Do you use a strap?

I'd only be using them for tennis.

Thank you, Randy


chart on the web.
If i don’t need to wear sunglasses, I don’t. I want as much available light as possible to be entering my eyes for the best visibility.

If I’m looking into the sun, I wear rose tinted polarized sunglasses for increased contrast.
 
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Sardines

Professional
I find sunglasses very useful when playing in the sun where it's in your eyes for the serve and over heads. This is especially true for places in the subtropics to the equator. The eyes don't have to adjust as quickly when looking up toward the sun. Of course, it's ALWAYS good to wear sunglasses outdoors to prevent eye issues later in life.
The green tint is ok for tennis if the court is all green, but gray and brown lenses work well too if the courts are green/red, or all green, but especially on all blue and blue/green hard courts, which I find brighter than green courts. Other surfaces like grass, I like brown or green with the optic yellow or white balls. For red clay or red/green turf courts in bright conditions, brown/green/gray work well.
As for fit, get as wide and tall frame without affecting fit of your facial features. I always wear a strap. If you perspire a lot, you may not want rubberized temples, which can rub wet skin on the temples, if there is a lot of movement over a long period of time. As for light transmission, choose based on where and when you play most. If you play mostly summer/late spring/fall, in the day time and you're in higher up latitudes, go for 50% or more light transmission. For more lower brightness, get 70% or more.
I need prescription lenses so I'm limited to special lenses like the Oakley or specialty places like SportRx etc.
 

wabbit

New User
I always wear sunglasses when I play or go outdoors because my optometrist told me I have the beginnings of eye damage. She recommended Oakley and a couple other well known brands. I've been playing almost 60 years and about 40 of those years without sunglasses. Since I've started wearing sunglasses my eye health has stabilized so they seem to work. As to color I've tried the green tints in a couple brands several other tints in Oakleys. I don't notice any loss of ability to track the ball with any of them. For me it just comes down to preference. I'm using a red tint now and during winter when the sun is low a very dark gray tint. All are polarized and have the iridium treatment.
 

stapletonj

Professional
Never had a use for sunglasses, but maybe this summer I will try. Im not getting any younger. any particular brand or feature?
 

jim e

Legend
I use the bolle glasses. The green ones do not block enough light for me. I wear sunglasses when it is too bright only and the darker lenses are the best. Nice that you can change lenses in them.
 

dlk

Hall of Fame
I use the bolle glasses. The green ones do not block enough light for me. I wear sunglasses when it is too bright only and the darker lenses are the best. Nice that you can change lenses in them.
Was a bandana guy. Now use a hat for sweat soak and to shadow Sun. I don’t like how glasses get slick/foggy/move etc...
 

wabbit

New User
The Oakley sunglasses designed for sport use have nose bridge and arm ends that are made of a rubber that stays tacky when you sweat so there is no movement in that situation. In addition their sport glasses are designed with ventilation in mind so there is no fogging or at least not in my experience.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
I have always worn glasses for corrected vision since I was about 12 yrs old. I tried corrected sunglasses a few times on court. But I never felt like I could see the ball that well.

But, I recently bought a pair of Oakley’s with prescription clear lenses. They are awesome. So good, that I’m considering ordering a second pair of Oakley frames with prescription sun glass lenses.
 

siata94

Rookie
I have several prescription sunglasses. My fav is Oakley with Oakley lens, prescription, amber tint and polarized. It's
rather expensive (around $500, lenses alone about $300) but well worth it since it's been my preferred for tennis/biking for
over 10 years. Fortunately my prescription has not changed much... For everything else, I use tinted prescription glasses
from zenni optical as they're cheap.
 

jxs653

Semi-Pro
I wear glasses and their being multicoated helps protect eyes from ultraviolet rays, right?

Regarding sunglasses, I don't use them because they are virtually useless when the ball enters sun.
 

naturallight

Semi-Pro
I wear Smith Rx Forge sunglasses with polarized brown lens. The ball really pops. No prob serving into the sun. Much more comfortable than contacts.
 

markwillplay

Hall of Fame
MUCH easier serving in the sun with sunglasses. You can’t look right into the sun but when you toss the ball near it, you can still see it. The glare of the sun is what gets me. I keep buying cheap sunglasses and you get what you pay for. I do think dark sunglasses don’t work as well as the ones that are amber or even sort of a green tint. Really lights up the ball. I need some new ones.
 

JW10S

Hall of Fame
When my sister, who was also a competitive tennis player, had to have surgery to remove pterygiums for her eyes, something common to people who spend a lot of time outdoors, I started to wear sunglasses. It took me a while to get used to it but now I cannot play without them. I like not having to squint anymore. I have a deal with Oakley so that's what I wear, lightweight, don't fog up, comfortable, at this point I don't even notice them--it's like they're not even there. And no pterygium surgeries for me.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
When my sister, who was also a competitive tennis player, had to have surgery to remove pterygiums for her eyes, something common to people who spend a lot of time outdoors, I started to wear sunglasses. It took me a while to get used to it but now I cannot play without them. I like not having to squint anymore. I have a deal with Oakley so that's what I wear, lightweight, don't fog up, comfortable, at this point I don't even notice them--it's like they're not even there. And no pterygium surgeries for me.
I’ve been wearing sunglasses now for 19 years. I had to learn to play with them and now I can’t imagine ever not wearing sunglasses. I found Oakley is best.
 

Zoolander

Hall of Fame
I cant play without sunnies. I cant drive without sunnies. I cant go outside without sunnies. If they werent so uncomfortable i would probably wear them to bed. My fav is amber tint, has been since ambervision sunnies came out in the 80’s or 90’s. But for tennis a darker grey is probably best.

Cant wear a hat. They always seem to come off when serving. So much for “one size fits all”!
 

AtTheNet

New User
I wear contact lenses, which make the eyes more sensitive to glare. So I have been a steadfast wearer of sunglasses for many years and for me they are a necessity for tennis. The OP has provided some solid information on lens choices, and some experimentation is needed to see what is right for each individual. IMO Serengeti makes some of the best sunglasses on the market--check out their website at www.serengeti-eyewear.com for excellent information on lens technology and color selection.

As for the fogging/misting, a dab of CatCrap will take care of that.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
Bolle sunglasses with the blue tint are the best for tennis. Not sure if they still make them but they really help the ball stand out.
Of course they also make every human look like the just came from a scene in The Walking Dead. So not so great for everyday wear.
 

WestboroChe

Hall of Fame
Bolle sunglasses with the blue tint are the best for tennis. Not sure if they still make them but they really help the ball stand out.
Of course they also make every human look like the just came from a scene in The Walking Dead. So not so great for everyday wear.
Yeah they still make those.
 

norcal

Hall of Fame
Keep a pair of Bolle's in my bag. Rarely use them but when I need to they are great. The blue is pretty much only good for tennis though.
 

MathGeek

Hall of Fame
I sometimes play with Ray-Ban Wayfarers :D
I have Ray-Ban Wayfarer frames with custom prescription lenses. Hi-index polycarbonate lenses, neutral gray, polarized, and on the dark side. I always wear them when playing during the day. They are great for mountain biking, ultimate, basketball, driving, fishing, and the shooting sports also.

I also almost always wear a hat - a baseball cap for tennis and most other outdoor sports, but something with a wider brim for fishing.
 

WestboroChe

Hall of Fame
I played for years with Rayban Predators. But between the kids and my dog it was too expensive to keep replacing so I switched to Bolle. They are just as good and about half the price.

Also the replacement lenses that you can get on the retail sites are indistinguishable from rayban lenses and cost about half.
 
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